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Demopolis (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
art on the last train from Jackson that went east-riding to Enterprise on the top of a freight car, at the end of a long train, and exposed to worse risk, I believe, for those forty miles than even in the Vicksburg court-house. I ought to remark that one pleasing feature of the march through Mississippi was the habit which women and children had of coming out to the fences and inquiring what made us surrender Vicksburg. The demoralization of the garrison extended beyond the State. At Demopolis the guard of the provost marshal came down to the wharf to stop the prisoners who had gotten so far, and to put them in parole camp at that point. The prisoners attacked them, broke through the line, and flung some of them into the gutter. They soon yielded to reason, however, and surrendered their paroles to the provost marshal. And this was the last I saw of the ill-starved garrison until, at Enterprise, Mr. Davis told them that Bragg would pave Rosecrans' way in gold if he (Bragg) co
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ecrans. He soon had occasion to alter his mind in this connection, and the troops which he had dispatched to General Bragg, at Chattanooga, were promptly withdrawn. Early in April, a new plan of campaign was adopted by General Grant. He struck work on the canal. His new scheme was to march his troops down on the west bank of the river to some suitable point below Vicksburg, and throw them over in transports that were to pass the batteries under veil of night. Already, in March, the Hartford and Albatross, of Farragut's squadron, had passed the Port Hudson guns. On the night of April 16th, a Federal fleet of gunboats and three transports, towing barges, ran by the batteries at Vicksburg and moored at Hard Times, La. (thirty miles, say, below the city), where the forces had arrived. On the night of the 22d six more transports and barges followed. The damage done by the Confederate artillerists on these two occasions summed up as follows: One transport sunk, one burned, six ba
) (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
y the batteries' fire, several men killed, others drowned, and the Scribes and Pharisees, clinging to bales of hay, with which the barges were fortified, drifted to land, were picked up and conveyed to a room in the court-house with other victims. They were treated as handsomely as circumstances allowed, and Richardson, in particular, a hearty fellow, made almost too good an impression, for he was so thoroughly full of faith in the resources of the Union and in the approaching downfall of Jeff Davis, that he cast a shadow of doubt over some young Confederates' breasts. They were all soon exchanged, going home by way of Richmond. They saw a few things from the windows of jails and cars, and wrote to their papers from Fortress Monroe most astonishing letters, containing revelations which they could hardly have been possessed of, unless they were members of the Cabinet of Mr. Davis. Another correspondent of the Tribune essayed to describe the passage of eight gunboats on the 16th.
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
and the administration as to the authority of the former over the army in Tennessee to order reinforcements from it to Mississippi. How far results were affected and responsibility fixed by these disagreements, and that between the generals in the fellows against the wall with such mutilation that their mothers would not have known their dead darlings. They were Mississippi militiamen. Their comrades above suffered only less cruelly. The heavy shell passing through the court-room, which whe right to go home as soon as they could get there, and without restrictions. Many had already deserted to the Trans-Mississippi, despite the aid of Federal guard-boats to check the stream. But when, at Brandon, it was learned that the cars would forty miles than even in the Vicksburg court-house. I ought to remark that one pleasing feature of the march through Mississippi was the habit which women and children had of coming out to the fences and inquiring what made us surrender Vicksburg.
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ing in many a radius their ponderous fragments. It is believed by the expert that a mortar shell is the most demoralizing agency of war. Throughout the war the Confederates had the same horror of them that the other side felt for masked batteries and Black Horse cavalry. For forty days and nights, without interval, the women and children of Vicksburg took calmly and bravely the iron storm which, in less volume and in a few minutes, turned back the victorious column of Beauregard from Pittsburg Landing. They wreaked their worst and utmost on the town, bringing out the most vicious of all war's aspects. That the ordinary atmosphere of life, the course of conversation, the thread of every human existence took in for nearly two months the momently contingency of these messengers of thunder and murder, is past ordinary comprehension. How many of them came and burst, nobody can have the least idea. An account says that on June 22d 150,000 shells fell inside of the city; hut this was p
Edward's Depot (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ackson by Pemberton, whose headquarters were at Edwards' Depot. On the 30th of April, General Sherman, commant; but the Thirteenth shortly turned off toward Edwards' Depot; while the Seventeenth, followed by the Fifteennemy is apparently moving in heavy force toward Edwards' Depot, on Southern Railroad. The movable army of Pems of Forney and M. L. Smith in loco, was now at Edwards' Depot, eighteen miles east of Vicksburg; and headquaover Baker's creek, which runs a little east of Edwards' Depot, in a southwesterly course, to the Big Black rromptly entered. McClernand, who had been near Edwards' Depot, having received orders to that effect, joined o march to Bolton's Depot, eight miles east of Edwards' Depot. Returning to Edwards' Depot, General PembertoEdwards' Depot, General Pemberton formed his line of battle-remaining, General Johnston contends, for five hours in front of a single Federal iate orders than did General Loring from his at Edwards' Depot, an act of independence for which General Johns
Gainsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
it is a great wonder that the casualties among the non-combatants were so few. I know of but one, and that was not fatal; the loss of an arm by Mrs. Major Reid, while bringing her children under shelter from a sudden storm of shells. There were doubtless others, but I have sought in vain to obtain the facts and names. Inside and outside the lines there were many exaggerated stories in this connection. One of the mortalities published was that of Mrs. General Pemberton, who was at Gainesville, Alabama, the while. How these people subsisted was another wonder. The straits to which the garrison were reduced are known, in part. After the tenth day of the siege, says the report of General Stephen D. Lee, the men lived on about half rations, and less than that toward the close. The ration has been described to consist of one-quarter pound of bacon, one-half pound of beef, five-eighths quart of meal, beside an allowance of peas, rice, sugar, and molasses. Of this, anon. The citi
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
t he departed no further from his immediate orders than did General Loring from his at Edwards' Depot, an act of independence for which General Johnston warmly lauds the latter. The effect of the surrender, North and South, was immense. At Washington Mr. Seward, in response to a serenade, was ready to swear that even old Virginia would soon be asking forgiveness on her knees. He never saw Virginia in that posture; but it may be doubted whether, after Vicksburg and the twin tragedy of Gettysburg, there was ever any vital hope in the Southern heart except among the soldiers. The army kept its high crest and stern front to the last, and died only with annihilation; but many a Vicksburg prisoner, gone home, spread the tale of disaster and the influence of dismay among simple folk whose faith never rallied. There were desperate battles afterward, and occasional victories, but their light only rendered deeper the advancing and impending shadow of ultimate failure. The world is famil
Tullahoma (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
followed by the Fifteenth, kept their faces toward Jackson. The latter column, on the 12th, encountered the single brigade of Gregg at Raymond and drove it away — not till after a stout resistance. McPherson then moved on Clinton-a station on the railroad ten miles west of Jackson-interposing between Vicksburg and General Joseph E. Johnston (who had arrived in Jackson on the 13th and assumed command), and breaking the line of Confederate coummunications. Prior to his departure from Tullahoma for the scene of war, General Johnston had sent an order to General Pemberton in these words: If Grant's army crosses [the Mississippi], unite all your forces to beat him. Success will give you back what you abandoned to win it. One dispatch had been received from General Pemberton, bearing date the 12th, and beginning: The enemy is apparently moving in heavy force toward Edwards' Depot, on Southern Railroad. The movable army of Pemberton, consisting of the divisions of Bowen and Loring,
Port Gibson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ifications. On April 30th the four divisions of McClernand's corps crossed, and on the 1st of May moved, and in brief time encountered the Confederate command of General Bowen, consisting of the brigades of Green and Tracy, four miles from Port Gibson. The Confederates were choice men, and fought gallantly against great odds; but on the next day General Bowen was forced out of Port Gibson, and retired across the suspension bridge of the Bayou Pierre to Grand Gulf. His stay here was transiPort Gibson, and retired across the suspension bridge of the Bayou Pierre to Grand Gulf. His stay here was transient, seeing that his flank was almost immediately turned. On the 3d he marched to Hankinson's Ferry, on the Big Black, and there met Loring and his division, sent from Jackson by Pemberton, whose headquarters were at Edwards' Depot. On the 30th of April, General Sherman, commanding the Fifteenth Corps, after a slight feint on Haines' Bluff, on the Yazoo, returned to Milliken's Bend and proceeded to the main body. On the 8th, the three corps met at Willow Spring, where McClernand and McPherso
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