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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
the Confederacy. Johnston answers Pemberton encouraging him to hold out-I am trying to get together a force to help you --and orders Gardner to evacuate Port Hudson. Before this order could be repeated Port Hudson was invested by the whole force from Baton Rouge. Thus far the preliminary narrative, which has been condensed to the exclusion of many important points-among them the discussion between General Johnston and the administration as to the authority of the former over the army in Tennessee to order reinforcements from it to Mississippi. How far results were affected and responsibility fixed by these disagreements, and that between the generals in the field, may be considered on a later page. It may be well credited that the garrison and the populace had not been indifferent while these great actions sped. That a crisis impended, every man and woman felt; and that the odds were greatly against us was equally evident. Still the people would not harbor the thought of de
Bovina (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
d been received from General Pemberton, bearing date the 12th, and beginning: The enemy is apparently moving in heavy force toward Edwards' Depot, on Southern Railroad. The movable army of Pemberton, consisting of the divisions of Bowen and Loring, which had come up from Grand Gulf, and Stevenson, who was detached from the garrison of Vicksburg, leaving the two divisions of Forney and M. L. Smith in loco, was now at Edwards' Depot, eighteen miles east of Vicksburg; and headquarters were at Bovina, a station some four miles west. On the 13th, General Johnston sent a dispatch to the War Department in these words: I arrived this evening, finding the enemy in force between this place and General Pemberton. I am too late. These were ominous words. Through Captain Yerger he dispatched that order to General Pemberton which has been the bone of contention in all the subsequent discussions on the responsibility of failure. It directed the latter to come up, if practicable, on the rear
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
int in the Confederacy. Johnston answers Pemberton encouraging him to hold out-I am trying to get together a force to help you --and orders Gardner to evacuate Port Hudson. Before this order could be repeated Port Hudson was invested by the whole force from Baton Rouge. Thus far the preliminary narrative, which has been condensePort Hudson was invested by the whole force from Baton Rouge. Thus far the preliminary narrative, which has been condensed to the exclusion of many important points-among them the discussion between General Johnston and the administration as to the authority of the former over the army in Tennessee to order reinforcements from it to Mississippi. How far results were affected and responsibility fixed by these disagreements, and that between the generunication of those exchanged between General Grant and Admiral Porter. By this means the first intelligence of Banks' attack upon and repulse from the works of Port Hudson was received and communicated to headquarters. A more noticeable feat remained to be achieved by the gallant Louisianian. After Pemberton's last proposition w
Richmond, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ys the enemy is bombarding night and day with seven mortars and artillery, and that he is losing many officers and men. He will hold out while he has anything to eat. Activity is urged by General Pemberton in a dispatch of the 15th. On June 14th and 15th, General Johnston writes Pemberton that he can only hope to save the garrison, and asks for the details of a plan of co-operation. He also holds out the hope of General Dick Taylor's reinforcing the outside army with 8,000 men from Richmond, La. On the 21st, Pemberton suggested as his plan that Johnston should move at night to the north of the railroad while he marched by the Warrenton road, by Hankinson's ferry, to which Johnston was to send two brigades of cavalry and two batteries. Snyder's Bluff was also suggested as his objective point. By verbal message General Pemberton said the army for his relief ought not to be less than 40,000 men. General Johnston asserts that his force never amounted to more than two-thirds of thi
De Soto (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
of safety. Vicksburg hangs on the side of a hill, whose name is poetical — the Sky Parlor. On it thousands of people assembled to see the great sight when the Federal ships went by on the night of the 16th of April; at which time the houses of De Soto were kindled on the other side, lending a lurid background to the dark shadows of the boats, while the fire of the batteries made the river a mirror of flame! But the Sky Parlor was reserved for other uses. Its soil was light and friable, and ecks, which no soul survives, in the illustrated papers, by our special artist. His coquetry with truth consisted in describing, as a mysterious and dreadful beacon that rose out of the earth at Vicksburg, the homely burning of some shanties in De Soto, which were set on fire to assist the aim of the artillery. The scene was terrific, and, no wonder, took on it for this correspondent a supernatural expression. But the war maps that were published were the greatest feats-quite distancing the
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
and adding that the order of evacuation had been submitted to a council of war, and while it was holding the enemy's guns opened. I have decided to hold Vicksburg as long as possible. I still conceive it to be the most important point in the Confederacy. Johnston answers Pemberton encouraging him to hold out-I am trying to get together a force to help you --and orders Gardner to evacuate Port Hudson. Before this order could be repeated Port Hudson was invested by the whole force from Baton Rouge. Thus far the preliminary narrative, which has been condensed to the exclusion of many important points-among them the discussion between General Johnston and the administration as to the authority of the former over the army in Tennessee to order reinforcements from it to Mississippi. How far results were affected and responsibility fixed by these disagreements, and that between the generals in the field, may be considered on a later page. It may be well credited that the garrison
Milliken's Bend (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
re at Edwards' Depot. On the 30th of April, General Sherman, commanding the Fifteenth Corps, after a slight feint on Haines' Bluff, on the Yazoo, returned to Milliken's Bend and proceeded to the main body. On the 8th, the three corps met at Willow Spring, where McClernand and McPherson (commanding the Seventeenth Corps) had been were believed at that time. The Richmond papers pathetically complained of the telegraphic genius at Jackson. The telegraphic geniuses at Young's Point and Milliken's Bend were far greater masters of the art of fiction. I will mention a case that preceded the investment. On the 3d of May, the tug Sturgis, with two barges, loadafterward killed), which had this refrain: Damn Memphis and strategy-Vicksburg's the place, And I am, dear Joseph, your Cannon, in haste. Next time it was Milliken's Bend that had been captured (there was a fight there). And then Kirby Smith had crossed the river at Natchez, and had a division at Young's Point. And so on, over
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
f events, their only refuge is in the indulgence of a desperate hope, whose alternative is despair and madness. There were, it is true, occasional breaks in the heavy monotone of time and things. One of these was the sinking of the gunboat Cincinnati, on May 26th. With notable audacity this vessel attempted to run suddenly upon and close with the batteries at the north end of the city, which were manned by a gallant command of Tennesseeans, and constituted the protection of the garrison's extreme left wing. As soon as she began steaming down the river, and even before she had passed the bend, the Cincinnati became the target of a concentrated and powerful cannonade, which was made none the less steady and effective by the Federals' own heavy fire. Before she reached the middle of the stream it was evident that her vitals were wounded. Reversing her course, she steamed heavily up the current, but only succeeded in running ashore on the west bank, a little above the extremity of
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
I do him the bare justice of recording my own conviction that his fealty to the cause which he espoused was beyond all peradventure of suspicion; that he did the very best he could; that he acted in accordance with his orders from Richmond; and that he departed no further from his immediate orders than did General Loring from his at Edwards' Depot, an act of independence for which General Johnston warmly lauds the latter. The effect of the surrender, North and South, was immense. At Washington Mr. Seward, in response to a serenade, was ready to swear that even old Virginia would soon be asking forgiveness on her knees. He never saw Virginia in that posture; but it may be doubted whether, after Vicksburg and the twin tragedy of Gettysburg, there was ever any vital hope in the Southern heart except among the soldiers. The army kept its high crest and stern front to the last, and died only with annihilation; but many a Vicksburg prisoner, gone home, spread the tale of disaster an
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ination; some were captured and some deserted. General Johnston had ten dispatches from Pemberton during the siege, but the number received from him was smaller. How these messengers made their way in and out I have no means of knowing; perhaps through the woods, and between the intricate system of hills and vales that surround the city, and perhaps in disguise as citizens of the country. One of the deserters was a youth named Douglass, a native of Illinois, who had lived several years in Texas, and was supposed to be loyal --our way. It was he who refreshed the correspondents with the news that Mrs. Pemberton (in Alabama) had been killed by a mortar shell. There were reports from time to time of the flitting of Lanar Fontaine, one of the numerous poets for whom the authorship of All quiet along the Potomac to-night is claimed, between the garrison and the outside world. I do not know if they were true or not. Once in a while authentic information, from official sources, of
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