hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 190 0 Browse Search
Grant 139 23 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 102 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 96 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 88 0 Browse Search
S. D. Lee 86 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 84 2 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 72 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 70 0 Browse Search
Stephen Lee 64 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death.. Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 5 results.

Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
To prejudiced provincialism, on the one side, they may appear too lukewarm; by stupid fanaticism on the other, they may be called treasonable. But-written without prejudice, and equally without fear, or favor — they have aimed only at impartial truth, and at nearest possible correctness of narration. Indubitably the war proved that there were great men, on both the sides to it; and, to-day, the little men on either--May profit by their example. If this be treason, make the most of it! The sole object kept in view was to paint honestly the inner life of the South; the general tone of her people, under strain and privation unparalleled; the gradual changes of society and character in the struggling nation — in a clear, unshaded outline of things as they were. Should this volume at all succeed in giving this; should it uproot one false impression, to plant a single true one in its place, then has it fully equaled the aspiration of the author. Mobile, Ala., June 25, 1
China (China) (search for this): chapter 1
In place of preface. Fortunate, indeed, is the reader who takes up a volume without preface; of which the persons are left to enact their own drama and the author does not come before the curtain, like the chorus of Greek tragedy, to speak for them. But, in printing the pages that follow, it may seem needful to ask that they be taken for what they are; simple sketches of the inner life of Rebeldom --behind its Chinese wall of wood and steel — during those unexampled four years of its existence. Written almost immediately after the war, from notes and recollections gathered during its most trying scenes, these papers are now revised, condensed and formulated for the first time. In years past, some of their crude predecessors have appeared — as random articles — in the columns of the Mobile Sunday Times, Appleton's Journal, the Louisville Courier-Journal, the Philadelphia Times and other publications. Even in their present condensation and revision, they claim only to<
ere a sealed book. False impressions, on many important points, were disseminated; and these, because unnoted, have grown to proportions of accepted truth. A few of them, it may not yet be too late to correct. While the pages that follow fail not to record some weaknesses in our people, or some flagrant errors of their leaders, they yet endeavor to chronicle faithfully heroic constancy of men, and selfless devotion of women, whose peers the student of History may challenge that vaunting Muse to show. To prejudiced provincialism, on the one side, they may appear too lukewarm; by stupid fanaticism on the other, they may be called treasonable. But-written without prejudice, and equally without fear, or favor — they have aimed only at impartial truth, and at nearest possible correctness of narration. Indubitably the war proved that there were great men, on both the sides to it; and, to-day, the little men on either--May profit by their example. If this be treason, make the
hey be taken for what they are; simple sketches of the inner life of Rebeldom --behind its Chinese wall of wood and steel — during those unexampled four years of its existence. Written almost immediately after the war, from notes and recollections gathered during its most trying scenes, these papers are now revised, condensed and formulated for the first time. In years past, some of their crude predecessors have appeared — as random articles — in the columns of the Mobile Sunday Times, Appleton's Journal, the Louisville Courier-Journal, the Philadelphia Times and other publications. Even in their present condensation and revision, they claim only to be simple memoranda of the result of great events; and of their reaction upon the mental and moral tone of the southern people, rather than a record of those events themselves. This volume aspires neither to the height of history, nor to the depths of political analysis; for it may still be too early for either, or for both, of<
June 25th, 1890 AD (search for this): chapter 1
To prejudiced provincialism, on the one side, they may appear too lukewarm; by stupid fanaticism on the other, they may be called treasonable. But-written without prejudice, and equally without fear, or favor — they have aimed only at impartial truth, and at nearest possible correctness of narration. Indubitably the war proved that there were great men, on both the sides to it; and, to-day, the little men on either--May profit by their example. If this be treason, make the most of it! The sole object kept in view was to paint honestly the inner life of the South; the general tone of her people, under strain and privation unparalleled; the gradual changes of society and character in the struggling nation — in a clear, unshaded outline of things as they were. Should this volume at all succeed in giving this; should it uproot one false impression, to plant a single true one in its place, then has it fully equaled the aspiration of the author. Mobile, Ala., June 25, 1890