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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
nd it; the fortifications were perfectly uncovered and their small garrisons utterly demoralized by the woe-begone and terrified fugitives constantly streaming by them. The triumphant legions of the South were almost near enough for their battle-cry to be heard in the Cabinet; and the southern people could not believe that the bright victory that had perched upon their banners would be allowed to fold her wings before another and bloodier flight, that would leave the North prostrate at her feet. Day after day they waited and — the wish being father to the thought-day after day the sun rose on fresh stories of an advance---a bloody fight — a splendid victory-or the capture of Washington. But the sun always set on an authoritative contradiction of them; and at last the excitement was forced to settle down on the news that General Johnston had extended his pickets as far as Mason's and Munson's hills, and the army had gone into camp on the field it had so bloodily won the week befo
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: after Manassas. How rumors came jubilation and revulsion anxiety for news the decisive charge an Austrian view the President's return his speech to the people the first train of wounded sorrow and consolation how women worked material and moral results of Manassas spoils and Overconfidence singular errors in public mind General belief in advance the Siesta and itut that the President had left that morning, on a special train and with a volunteer staff, for Manassas. This set the whole tribe agog, and wonderful were the speculations and rumors that flew aboutr truth to be expected from the morbid anxiety. No one reflected that these men must have left Manassas before the fighting was even hotly joined; and could only have gained their diluted intelligenc in deepest mourning, to recall the fever of that fearful night. Though the after effect of Manassas proved undoubtedly bad, the immediate fruits of the victory were of incalculable value. Panics
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 16
st of the deadly rain of fire-wherever the blue coats are thickest! Their front lines waver-General Smith falls, but Elzey gains the crest of the plateau-like a fire in the prairie spreads the conta pay depended upon their neutrality; and all agree that the battle was saved by the advent of Kirby Smith, just at that critical moment when the numbers of the North were sweeping resistlessly over tpports, there was no earthly reason for their not doing — there could have been but one result. Smith's forces could not have held their own that much longer against overwhelming numbers; and the wey troops who had been fighting all day could not even have supported them in a heavy fight. Had Smith reached the scene of action at morning instead of noon, he, too, might have shared the general fle — that the Hampton Legion was annihilated-Hampton himself killed-Beauregard was wounded-Kirby Smith killed — the first Virginia was cut to pieces and the Alabama troops swept from the face of the <
nd it; the fortifications were perfectly uncovered and their small garrisons utterly demoralized by the woe-begone and terrified fugitives constantly streaming by them. The triumphant legions of the South were almost near enough for their battle-cry to be heard in the Cabinet; and the southern people could not believe that the bright victory that had perched upon their banners would be allowed to fold her wings before another and bloodier flight, that would leave the North prostrate at her feet. Day after day they waited and — the wish being father to the thought-day after day the sun rose on fresh stories of an advance---a bloody fight — a splendid victory-or the capture of Washington. But the sun always set on an authoritative contradiction of them; and at last the excitement was forced to settle down on the news that General Johnston had extended his pickets as far as Mason's and Munson's hills, and the army had gone into camp on the field it had so bloodily won the week befo
d it; the fortifications were perfectly uncovered and their small garrisons utterly demoralized by the woe-begone and terrified fugitives constantly streaming by them. The triumphant legions of the South were almost near enough for their battle-cry to be heard in the Cabinet; and the southern people could not believe that the bright victory that had perched upon their banners would be allowed to fold her wings before another and bloodier flight, that would leave the North prostrate at her feet. Day after day they waited and — the wish being father to the thought-day after day the sun rose on fresh stories of an advance---a bloody fight — a splendid victory-or the capture of Washington. But the sun always set on an authoritative contradiction of them; and at last the excitement was forced to settle down on the news that General Johnston had extended his pickets as far as Mason's and Munson's hills, and the army had gone into camp on the field it had so bloodily won the week befo
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 16
nd it; the fortifications were perfectly uncovered and their small garrisons utterly demoralized by the woe-begone and terrified fugitives constantly streaming by them. The triumphant legions of the South were almost near enough for their battle-cry to be heard in the Cabinet; and the southern people could not believe that the bright victory that had perched upon their banners would be allowed to fold her wings before another and bloodier flight, that would leave the North prostrate at her feet. Day after day they waited and — the wish being father to the thought-day after day the sun rose on fresh stories of an advance---a bloody fight — a splendid victory-or the capture of Washington. But the sun always set on an authoritative contradiction of them; and at last the excitement was forced to settle down on the news that General Johnston had extended his pickets as far as Mason's and Munson's hills, and the army had gone into camp on the field it had so bloodily won the week befo
Ed Johnson (search for this): chapter 16
e on, trains coming in occasionally only to disappoint the crowds that rushed to surround them. No one came who had seen the battle-all had heard what they related. And though no man was base enough to play upon feelings such as theirs, the love of common natures for being oracles carried them away; and they repeated far more even than that. Next day the news was more full, and the details of the fight came in with some lists of the wounded. The victory was dearly bought. Bee, Bartow, Johnson, and others equally valuable, were dead. Some of the best and bravest from every state had sealed their devotion to the flag with their blood. Still, so immense were the consequences of the victory now judged-to be, that even the wildest rumors of the day before had not told one half. At night the President returned; and on the train with him were the bodies of the dead generals, with their garde d'honneur. These proceeded to the Capitol, while Mr. Davis went to the Spotswood and addr
umbers, ammunition, medical stores and miles of wagon and ambulance trains, near six thousand stand of small arms, of the newest pattern and in best condition, fell into the hands of the half-armed rebels. These last were the real prize of the victors, putting a dozen new regiments waiting only for arms, at once on an effective war-footing. Blankets, tents and clothing were captured in bulk; nor were they to be despised by soldiers who had, left home with knapsacks as empty as those of Falstaff's heroes. But the moral effect of the victory was to elate the tone of the army far above any previous act of the war. Already prepared not to undervalue their own prowess, its ease and completeness left a universal sense of their invincibility, till the feeling became common in the ranks-and spread thence to the people — that one southern man was worth a dozen Yankees; and that if they did not come in numbers greater than five to one, the result of any conflict was assured. Everyth
tinate even of the southern troops-after doing more than desperate courage and determined pluck could warrant — were breaking and giving way, then the wild yell of Elzey's brigade broke through the pines like a clarion! On came that devoted band, breathless and worn with their run from the railroad; eight hundred Marylanders-and ooops-past their weary brothers, into the hottest of the deadly rain of fire-wherever the blue coats are thickest! Their front lines waver-General Smith falls, but Elzey gains the crest of the plateau-like a fire in the prairie spreads the contagion of fear-line after line melts before the hot blast of that charge — a moment more a by the advent of Kirby Smith, just at that critical moment when the numbers of the North were sweeping resistlessly over the broken and worn troops of the South. Elzey's brigade no doubt saved the day, for they created the panic. But I look upon it as a most causeless one, once said an Austrian officer to me, for had the Fede
Varina Howell Davis (search for this): chapter 16
as dearly bought. Bee, Bartow, Johnson, and others equally valuable, were dead. Some of the best and bravest from every state had sealed their devotion to the flag with their blood. Still, so immense were the consequences of the victory now judged-to be, that even the wildest rumors of the day before had not told one half. At night the President returned; and on the train with him were the bodies of the dead generals, with their garde d'honneur. These proceeded to the Capitol, while Mr. Davis went to the Spotswood and addressed a vast crowd that had collected before it. He told them in simple, but glowing, language that the first blow for liberty had been struck and struck home; that the hosts of the North had been scattered like chaff before southern might and southern right; that the cause was just and must prevail. Then he spoke words of consolation to the stricken city. Many of her noblest were spared; the wounded had reaped a glory far beyond the scars they bore; the dea
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