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check the third great advance upon Manassas. Working on the inner line and being thus better able to concentrate his strength, he left only enough troops around Richmond to delay any advance of McClellan from the Peninsula; and, before the end of July, sent Stonewall Jackson — with Ewell's, A. P. Hill's, and his own old division under General Charles S. Winder, in all about 10,000 men — to frustrate the flatulent designs of the gong-sounding commander, whose Chinese warfare was echoing so loudlnames of Buckner, Hardee, Cheatham and Adams with fresh bays; and it gave to Joseph Wheeler a record that the people of that country will long remember. In the events first preceding the disaster, too, as well as in his independent raid during July, John H. Morgan had added additional luster to his rising star, that was only to culminate in his exploits of the next year. These were the brighter gleams; but the whole picture was, indeed, a somber one; and there can be no wonder at the people
August 9th (search for this): chapter 25
rength, he left only enough troops around Richmond to delay any advance of McClellan from the Peninsula; and, before the end of July, sent Stonewall Jackson — with Ewell's, A. P. Hill's, and his own old division under General Charles S. Winder, in all about 10,000 men — to frustrate the flatulent designs of the gong-sounding commander, whose Chinese warfare was echoing so loudly from the frontier. Cautious, rapid and tireless as ever, Jackson advanced into Culpeper county; and on the 9th of August gave the gong-sounder his first lesson on the field of Cedar Mountain. Throwing a portion of his force under Early on the enemy's flank and bringing Ewell and, later, Winder against his front, Jackson forced him from his position after a bloody fight, which the advance of A. P. Hill turned into a complete victory. Cedar Mountain was a sharp and well-contested fight; but the Confederates inflicted a loss five times their own, held the field, and captured a number of prisoners and gu
August 29th (search for this): chapter 25
ense — was to be carried out, as suggested by Beauregard. General Bragg entered upon his command with a show of great vigor-falling into General Beauregard's views that a diversion toward Ohio, threatening Cincinnati, would leave the main army free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops that could be spared-ill clad, badly equipped, and with no commissariat-was pushed forward toward the Ohio. On the 29th of August-while our victorious cannon were still echoing over the field of the second Manassas-he met and defeated the enemy at Richmond; pressed on to Lexington, and thence to a point in easy reach of Cincinnati-at that moment not only the great granary and storehouse of the Federal armies of the West, but their depot and arsenal as well; her wharves crowded with transports, quartermasters' steamers and unfinished gunboats, and her warehouses bursting with commissary and ordnance stores. When
September 17th (search for this): chapter 25
re at his will toward the Ohio. That a Confederate army, at least equal in all respects, save perhaps numbers, to that of the enemy, should thus allow him to escape was then inexplicable to the people; and, as far as I have learned, it is so still. There is no critic so censorious as the self-appointed one; no god so inexorable as the people's voice. General Bragg's last hold upon the southern masses-military and civil — was lost now. The fight at Munfordville occurred on the 17th of September, but it was not until the 4th of the next month that the junction with Smith was effected at Frankfort. Then followed a Federal advance upon that town, which proved a mere diversion; but it produced the effect of deceiving General Bragg and of causing him to divide his forces. Hardee's and Buckner's divisions were sent to Perryville; and they with Cheatham's — who joined them by a forced marchbore the brunt of the battle of Perryville on the 8th of October. Notwithstanding the great
October 8th (search for this): chapter 25
nfordville occurred on the 17th of September, but it was not until the 4th of the next month that the junction with Smith was effected at Frankfort. Then followed a Federal advance upon that town, which proved a mere diversion; but it produced the effect of deceiving General Bragg and of causing him to divide his forces. Hardee's and Buckner's divisions were sent to Perryville; and they with Cheatham's — who joined them by a forced marchbore the brunt of the battle of Perryville on the 8th of October. Notwithstanding the great disparity of numbers, the vim of the barefooted boys prevailed against the veterans of Buell's army, under General G. W. Thomas. They gained a decided advantage over three times their number, but once again what was a mere success might have been a crushing defeat, had Bragg's whole army been massed at Perryville. It is neither within the scope nor the purpose of this chapter to give more than a bare skeleton of events, or to discuss the delicate points o
; and it arraigned the President for the fault of his inferior, calling him to trial before a jury that daily was becoming more biased and more bitter against him. Like all the gloomy pages of Confederate history, the Kentucky campaign was illumined by flashes of brilliance, dash and enduring courage, surpassed by no theater of the war. Disastrous as it was in result, it fixed more firmly than ever the high reputation of Kirby Smith; it wreathed the names of Buckner, Hardee, Cheatham and Adams with fresh bays; and it gave to Joseph Wheeler a record that the people of that country will long remember. In the events first preceding the disaster, too, as well as in his independent raid during July, John H. Morgan had added additional luster to his rising star, that was only to culminate in his exploits of the next year. These were the brighter gleams; but the whole picture was, indeed, a somber one; and there can be no wonder at the people's anger and distrust when they looked up
Pierre G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 25
le believed that General Bragg was a pet-if not a creature of Mr, Davis; and that he was thrust into a position that others deserved far more, when he succeeded Beauregard in command of the army of the West. The latter officer had, after the evacuation of Corinth, been compelled to retire by ill health; and Bragg was soon sentple that Kentucky was to be the theater of active operations, and that a programme of aggression-rather than of defense — was to be carried out, as suggested by Beauregard. General Bragg entered upon his command with a show of great vigor-falling into General Beauregard's views that a diversion toward Ohio, threatening CincinnGeneral Beauregard's views that a diversion toward Ohio, threatening Cincinnati, would leave the main army free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops that could be spared-ill clad, badly equipped, and with no commissariat-was pushed forward toward the Ohio. On the 29th of August-while our victorious cannon were still ec
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 25
egheny well conceived Federal programme General Bragg's unpopularity to the Ohio and back woulhis invaluable section was entrusted. General Braxton Bragg-however causeless and unjust their dich, been compelled to retire by ill health; and Bragg was soon sent to take his place, with the underried out, as suggested by Beauregard. General Bragg entered upon his command with a show of grfrom before Cincinnati; and that all action of Bragg's forces would be postponed until Smith's juncductive of any result; for, after the victory, Bragg allowed Buell to escape from his front and ret god so inexorable as the people's voice. General Bragg's last hold upon the southern masses-militn; but it produced the effect of deceiving General Bragg and of causing him to divide his forces. success might have been a crushing defeat, had Bragg's whole army been massed at Perryville. Itmpaign reached them. Unpopular as the name of Bragg had been before, it was now mentioned often wi[2 more...]
S. B. Buckner (search for this): chapter 25
that the junction with Smith was effected at Frankfort. Then followed a Federal advance upon that town, which proved a mere diversion; but it produced the effect of deceiving General Bragg and of causing him to divide his forces. Hardee's and Buckner's divisions were sent to Perryville; and they with Cheatham's — who joined them by a forced marchbore the brunt of the battle of Perryville on the 8th of October. Notwithstanding the great disparity of numbers, the vim of the barefooted boys pr Kentucky campaign was illumined by flashes of brilliance, dash and enduring courage, surpassed by no theater of the war. Disastrous as it was in result, it fixed more firmly than ever the high reputation of Kirby Smith; it wreathed the names of Buckner, Hardee, Cheatham and Adams with fresh bays; and it gave to Joseph Wheeler a record that the people of that country will long remember. In the events first preceding the disaster, too, as well as in his independent raid during July, John H.
oward more rapid completion. These designs were to hold the State of Kentucky by the army under Buell, wrest from the South the possession of Tennessee and Alabama--as a base for attack upon Georgianati, would leave the main army free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops that could be spared-ill clad, badly enfederates were in full march for the enemy; that any moment might bring news of the crushing of Buell before re-enforcements, or fresh supplies, could reach him. Great was the disappointment, therefvy loss upon both sides, but not productive of any result; for, after the victory, Bragg allowed Buell to escape from his front and retire at his will toward the Ohio. That a Confederate army, at lethe great disparity of numbers, the vim of the barefooted boys prevailed against the veterans of Buell's army, under General G. W. Thomas. They gained a decided advantage over three times their numb
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