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Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
and sweep ruin and destruction over the whole trans-Alleghany region. Not dispirited by the reverses in Virginia, the northern government remitted nothing of its designs upon the West, but rather pushed them toward more rapid completion. These designs were to hold the State of Kentucky by the army under Buell, wrest from the South the possession of Tennessee and Alabama--as a base for attack upon Georgia and cutting through to the seaboard; and to push the army under Grant down through Mississippi to the Gulf. These movements would not only weaken the Confederacy, by diverting so many men, ill to be spared, to watch the various columns; but would, moreover, wrest from it the great grain-producing and cattle-grazing sections from which the armies were mainly fed. Simultaneously with these a heavy force was to be massed under McClernand in Ohio, to sweep down the Mississippi; while the weak show of Confederate force in the states west of the river was to be crushed before it could m
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
o be spared, to watch the various columns; but would, moreover, wrest from it the great grain-producing and cattle-grazing sections from which the armies were mainly fed. Simultaneously with these a heavy force was to be massed under McClernand in Ohio, to sweep down the Mississippi; while the weak show of Confederate force in the states west of the river was to be crushed before it could make head. Such was the Federal programme; well conceived and backed by every appliance of means, men ans, and that a programme of aggression-rather than of defense — was to be carried out, as suggested by Beauregard. General Bragg entered upon his command with a show of great vigor-falling into General Beauregard's views that a diversion toward Ohio, threatening Cincinnati, would leave the main army free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops that could be spared-ill clad, badly equipped, and with no commissa
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
front, Jackson forced him from his position after a bloody fight, which the advance of A. P. Hill turned into a complete victory. Cedar Mountain was a sharp and well-contested fight; but the Confederates inflicted a loss five times their own, held the field, and captured a number of prisoners and guns. General Winder led his troops gallantly to the charge, but just at the moment of collision he was struck and mortally wounded by a shell. And the unstained spirit of the gallant son of Maryland winged its flight, ere the shouts of victory could cheer it on its way! The Washington government at once ordered the remains of Mc- Clellan's army to General Pope; and massing with them Burnside's army at Fredericksburg and the vicinity, strained every nerve to aid his successful advance. But here we may digress for the moment, to take a bird's-eye view of matters of grave moment passing in distant quarters of the Confederacy. While victory had perched upon Confederate banners
Culpeper (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
able to concentrate his strength, he left only enough troops around Richmond to delay any advance of McClellan from the Peninsula; and, before the end of July, sent Stonewall Jackson — with Ewell's, A. P. Hill's, and his own old division under General Charles S. Winder, in all about 10,000 men — to frustrate the flatulent designs of the gong-sounding commander, whose Chinese warfare was echoing so loudly from the frontier. Cautious, rapid and tireless as ever, Jackson advanced into Culpeper county; and on the 9th of August gave the gong-sounder his first lesson on the field of Cedar Mountain. Throwing a portion of his force under Early on the enemy's flank and bringing Ewell and, later, Winder against his front, Jackson forced him from his position after a bloody fight, which the advance of A. P. Hill turned into a complete victory. Cedar Mountain was a sharp and well-contested fight; but the Confederates inflicted a loss five times their own, held the field, and captured a
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
o retire by ill health; and Bragg was soon sent to take his place, with the understanding in the minds of the people that Kentucky was to be the theater of active operations, and that a programme of aggression-rather than of defense — was to be carried out, as suggested by Beauregard. General Bragg entered upon his command with a show of great vigor-falling into General Beauregard's views that a diversion toward Ohio, threatening Cincinnati, would leave the main army free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops that could be spared-ill clad, badly equipped, and with no commissariat-was pushed forward toward the Ohio. On the 29th of August-while our victorious cannon were still echoing over the field of the second Manassas-he met and defeated the enemy at Richmond; pressed on to Lexington, and thence to a point in easy reach of Cincinnati-at that moment not only the great granary and storehouse of t
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
every nerve to aid his successful advance. But here we may digress for the moment, to take a bird's-eye view of matters of grave moment passing in distant quarters of the Confederacy. While victory had perched upon Confederate banners in Virginia, a heavy cloud was gathering over the West; threatening to burst and sweep ruin and destruction over the whole trans-Alleghany region. Not dispirited by the reverses in Virginia, the northern government remitted nothing of its designs upon the Virginia, the northern government remitted nothing of its designs upon the West, but rather pushed them toward more rapid completion. These designs were to hold the State of Kentucky by the army under Buell, wrest from the South the possession of Tennessee and Alabama--as a base for attack upon Georgia and cutting through to the seaboard; and to push the army under Grant down through Mississippi to the Gulf. These movements would not only weaken the Confederacy, by diverting so many men, ill to be spared, to watch the various columns; but would, moreover, wrest from
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
uregard. General Bragg entered upon his command with a show of great vigor-falling into General Beauregard's views that a diversion toward Ohio, threatening Cincinnati, would leave the main army free to march upon Louisville before re-enforcements could reach Buell. With this view General Kirby Smith, with all the troops thaters and unfinished gunboats, and her warehouses bursting with commissary and ordnance stores. When the news of Smith's triumphant march to the very gates of Cincinnati reached Richmond, it was universally believed that the city would be captured, or laid in ashes; and thinking men saw great results in the delay such destructinforcements, or fresh supplies, could reach him. Great was the disappointment, therefore, when news really came of the withdrawal of southern troops from before Cincinnati; and that all action of Bragg's forces would be postponed until Smith's junction with him. Intense anxiety reigned at the Capital, enlivened only by the fit
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
and intrigue behind his back, and the terrible enemy before him-had saved his army, than the Government responded to it. Large numbers of men were sent from Harrison's Landing to Acquia Creek; the Federal forces at Warrentown, Alexandria and Fredericksburg were mobilized and strengthened; and the baton of command was wrenched from the hand of McClellan to be placed in that of Major-General John Pope! The history of this new popular hero, to this time, may be summed up by saying that he had t of the gallant son of Maryland winged its flight, ere the shouts of victory could cheer it on its way! The Washington government at once ordered the remains of Mc- Clellan's army to General Pope; and massing with them Burnside's army at Fredericksburg and the vicinity, strained every nerve to aid his successful advance. But here we may digress for the moment, to take a bird's-eye view of matters of grave moment passing in distant quarters of the Confederacy. While victory had perch
Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
th and South. Confederates hopeful, but not overconfident the cost to the North McClellan sacrificed General Pope and his methods he finds Jackson at Cedar Mountain a glance trans Allegheny well conceived Federal programme General Bragg's unpopularity to the Ohio and back would-be critics flashes illumine the clou Cautious, rapid and tireless as ever, Jackson advanced into Culpeper county; and on the 9th of August gave the gong-sounder his first lesson on the field of Cedar Mountain. Throwing a portion of his force under Early on the enemy's flank and bringing Ewell and, later, Winder against his front, Jackson forced him from his position after a bloody fight, which the advance of A. P. Hill turned into a complete victory. Cedar Mountain was a sharp and well-contested fight; but the Confederates inflicted a loss five times their own, held the field, and captured a number of prisoners and guns. General Winder led his troops gallantly to the charge, but just
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
pularity to the Ohio and back would-be critics flashes illumine the clouds Kentucky Misrepresented. The result of the Seven days was to produce a profound joyopushed them toward more rapid completion. These designs were to hold the State of Kentucky by the army under Buell, wrest from the South the possession of Tennesseesent to take his place, with the understanding in the minds of the people that Kentucky was to be the theater of active operations, and that a programme of aggressionemy into the heart of their territory. Meantime, General Bragg had entered Kentucky from Chattanooga, with an army re-enforced and better equipped than had been s from Federal occupation-resulted only in the retreat of the Confederates from Kentucky. For, whatever may have been the cause, or the necessity for the movement,er stupid, if not barbarous. A grave injustice had been done the people of Kentucky, because of their conduct during the retreat. Baseless charges of their cowar
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