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Stephen Lee (search for this): chapter 29
uation of the Peninsula by the Federals was General Lee's movement, to throw beyond the Rapidan a ferate corps now fronted toward the main army of Lee, and the bragging Federal found himself between the small force of Jackson and crush it before Lee could advance to his rescue. Following this plt the same time opening his communications with Lee's advance. In all this, General Stuart gave New glories, too, shone around the names of Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, Hood, Kemper and Jenkins;ll of Harper's Ferry — on the 17th of September-Lee had massed some 35,000 men on the banks of the ing that this time he had really gotten between Lee and Richmond. What was his disgust to find, a straggling fringe of pines. On these hills, Lee massed his artillery, to sweep the whole plain ks, abatis and rifle-pits. Next morning General Lee assaulted in force, all along the line; andre's Hill by assault. This acted as a check to Lee, who was forced to detach McLaws' division to d[8 more...]
ching crescent that pours its ceaseless rain of fire through them; while the great guns behind its center thunder and roll In the very glee of war, sending death-winged bolts tearing and crushing through them. Through the carnival of death Hood has sent his Texans and Georgians at a run-their wild yells rending the dull roar of the fight; their bayonets flashing in a jagged line of light like hungry teeth! Jackson has swung gradually round the enemy's right; and Stephen Lee's artillery the gong-sounder, and the complete destruction of the new Onto-Richmond; the capture of over 7,000 prisoners-paroled on the field-and his admitted total loss of 28,000 men. New glories, too, shone around the names of Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, Hood, Kemper and Jenkins; and the efficient aid and splendid fighting of the cavalry of Stuart, Hampton and Bev Robinson, here proved that arm to have reached its point of highest efficiency. The heart of the South, still throbbing with triumph aft
ar before; an absolute rout was only saved the Federals by falling back to the reserve under Franklin, when the retreat became more orderly, as there was no pursuit. The solid fruits of the victory were the annihilation of all the plans of the gong-sounder, and the complete destruction of the new Onto-Richmond; the capture of over 7,000 prisoners-paroled on the field-and his admitted total loss of 28,000 men. New glories, too, shone around the names of Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, Hood, Kemper and Jenkins; and the efficient aid and splendid fighting of the cavalry of Stuart, Hampton and Bev Robinson, here proved that arm to have reached its point of highest efficiency. The heart of the South, still throbbing with triumph after the Seven Days and their bright corollary of Cedar Mountain, went up in one wild throb of joyous thanksgiving. So satisfied were the people of the sagacity of their leaders and the invincible valor of their troops; so carried away were they by the splen
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 29
s it might be called — from Warrenton to Manassas. By the 29th of August, Longstreet's corps had effected the passage of Thoroughfare Gap and united with Jackson; after line emerges from enveloping clouds of smoke, charging the fronts that Longstreet and Jackson steadily oppose to them. Line after line melts before that inevi of 28,000 men. New glories, too, shone around the names of Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, Hood, Kemper and Jenkins; and the efficient aid and splendid fighting of theg his army, the latter divided it into three corps, under command of Jackson, Longstreet and A. P. Hill; and moved rapidly toward the accomplishment of that cherishedctated from the Federal Capital. On the 14th of September, D. H. Hill, of Longstreet's corpsstationed at Boonesboro to protect Jackson's flank — was attacked by aossing; and arranged his line of battle with A. P. Hill holding the right and Longstreet the left. On the night of December 10th, Stafford Heights opened a furious b
by the accurate fire of the Louisianians and McLaws' veterans — the head of the column went down, only to be filled by the gallant fellows behind. Into the jaws of death they came, up to the very works-then, with half their number dead and dying about their feet, they broke, the left gave way-and the bloody field was won at all points. The victory was terrible and complete. But it had cost dear, and the rejoicing in Richmond was tempered with sorrow for the loss of such as Maxcy Gregg, Cobb, and many others, lying cold upon the field of victory. And with the first feeling of triumph the news brought, came the thought that this time surely the enemy would be pushed-this time he was indeed a prey! Broken and demoralized, with a deep river in his rear that he must cross in pontoons, the people felt that he could surely be destroyed before reaching his Stafford stronghold. But once again, as ever, the shattered and broken legions of Burnside were allowed two days to recover fr
A. E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 29
Fredericksburg and its effect on the people why on pursuit? Hooker replaces Burnside death of Stonewall Jackson. Of such vast import to the southern cause was to his rescue. Following this plan, and depending also upon the heavy masses Burnside was bringing down to him from Fredericksburg, Pope attacked Jackson in detail d them once more. The outcry in the North resulted in the choice of General A. E. Burnside to command the new invasion; and he was of course hailed as the augur, e Valley-road Onto-Rich-mond. With a renewed, and splendidly appointed, army, Burnside moved in November toward Fredericksburg; thinking that this time he had reallyford stronghold. But once again, as ever, the shattered and broken legions of Burnside were allowed two days to recover from their demoralization; to pass at leisured, reacted on Richmond; and the gloom in the Capital grew deep and universal. Burnside had, meantime, been dismissed in disgrace for his shameful failure. The inevi
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 29
dericksburg and its effect on the people why on pursuit? Hooker replaces Burnside death of Stonewall Jackson. Of such up in the North; then the inevitable result had come. Joseph Hooker was now the coming man — the war-gong was sounded more cure impatience for the moment when the roads would permit Hooker to advance. And the South waited, too — not hopefully,grasp them. At last the movement came. Late in April, Hooker divided his immense army into two columns, one menacing ris right wing-while the left was confided to General Slocum-Hooker rapidly crossed the river, concentrating not less than 60,leswould have shown complete defeat, even annihilation, of Hooker's right. But it was not so written in the Book of Lifefalling night, opportunity for partial reorganization. Hooker's right was turned and doubled upon his center; but he wasannock resulted in complete defeat of Sedgwick. Still, Hooker was permitted to withdraw his army across the river; but t
und that reached their ears was the menacing roar from retreating ranks that left near one-third their number stark and ghastly on that grim field, where the Death Angel has so darkly flapped his wings. Thus ended the first Maryland campaign. It had given the people their wish; it had carried the gray jackets over the border and stricken the enemy sorely on his own soil. But it had left that soil drenched with the blood of some of the bravest and best; the noble Branch and chivalric Starke had both fallen where their men lay thickest-torn and ghastly on that terrible field. The details of that field which the Richmond people gathered from the northern papers, deepened their gloom. And through it rose a hoarse whisper, swelling at last into angry query, why had the campaign miscarried? If the army was inadequate in numbers, why had General Lee carried it over that river he had never crossed before, when his own army was better and the enemy less prepared? And if, as stat
Bev Robinson (search for this): chapter 29
en the retreat became more orderly, as there was no pursuit. The solid fruits of the victory were the annihilation of all the plans of the gong-sounder, and the complete destruction of the new Onto-Richmond; the capture of over 7,000 prisoners-paroled on the field-and his admitted total loss of 28,000 men. New glories, too, shone around the names of Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, Hood, Kemper and Jenkins; and the efficient aid and splendid fighting of the cavalry of Stuart, Hampton and Bev Robinson, here proved that arm to have reached its point of highest efficiency. The heart of the South, still throbbing with triumph after the Seven Days and their bright corollary of Cedar Mountain, went up in one wild throb of joyous thanksgiving. So satisfied were the people of the sagacity of their leaders and the invincible valor of their troops; so carried away were they by the splendid reflection from the glory over Manassas plain — that this time they never even stopped to question wh
Precedents of the first Maryland campaign Jackson strikes Pope second Manassas why was victory not pushed? the people d, to throw beyond the Rapidan a force sufficient to prevent Pope's passage of that river. After Cedar Mountain, Jackson haded him up. It was believed in the North that the advance of Pope's masses had cut him off from the main army and locked him and rolling-stock given to feed the flames. Jackson was in Pope's rear! This Confederate corps now fronted toward the msses Burnside was bringing down to him from Fredericksburg, Pope attacked Jackson in detail at Bristow and at Manassas, with's cavalry, and in keeping Jackson advised of the course of Pope's retreat-or advance, as it might be called — from Warrentoited with Jackson; and on that day these corps engaged with Pope's advance in a terrific fight, lasting from midday till darinto an avenging invader, created equal surprise as panic. Pope summarily dropped from the pinnacle of public favor into di
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