hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 190 0 Browse Search
Grant 139 23 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 102 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 96 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 88 0 Browse Search
S. D. Lee 86 0 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 84 2 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 72 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 70 0 Browse Search
Stephen Lee 64 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death.. Search the whole document.

Found 225 total hits in 53 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
d them once more. The outcry in the North resulted in the choice of General A. E. Burnside to command the new invasion; and he was of course hailed as the augur, who was surely this time to read the oracle. Watchful, calm, and steadfast, the Confederate waited, through the months of preparation, to meet the new advance-so disposing part of his force about Winchester as to prevent the favorite Valley-road Onto-Rich-mond. With a renewed, and splendidly appointed, army, Burnside moved in November toward Fredericksburg; thinking that this time he had really gotten between Lee and Richmond. What was his disgust to find, when he reached the Rappahannock, that the Confederate army was not all at Winchester, but was before him to dispute his crossing. After some unavailing maneuvers for position, the Federals sat down on the heights of Stafford, opposite Fredericksburg; made works at their leisure; and spread a perfect city of tents and booths over a line of some five miles. Outnumb
September 14th (search for this): chapter 29
a secure feeling that when these were torn with shell and drenched with carnage; when barns were rifled and crops trampled by hostile feet, the northern people would begin to appreciate the realities of a war they had so far only seen by the roseate light of a partial press. Secure and confident in the army that was to work their oracle, the hope of the South already drew triumphant pictures of defeated armies, harassed states, and a peace dictated from the Federal Capital. On the 14th of September, D. H. Hill, of Longstreet's corpsstationed at Boonesboro to protect Jackson's flank — was attacked by a heavy force. Heavily outnumbered, Hill fought a dogged and obstinate battle-giving and taking terrific blows, only ceasing when night stopped the fight. It was hard to tell which side had the best of the actual fighting; but the great object was gained and the next day Harper's Ferry, with its heavy garrison and immense supply of arms, stores and munitions, was surrendered to Jack
September 17th (search for this): chapter 29
r confidence and more secure became their calculations; and the vivid contrast between the ragged, shoeless and incongruous army of the South with the sleek, spruce garrison surrendered to them, only, heightened the zest of the victory and the anticipation of those to follow. But a sudden check was to come to this mid-career of anticipation, and a pall of doubt and dismay was to drape the fair form of Hope, even in her infancy. Two days after the fall of Harper's Ferry — on the 17th of September-Lee had massed some 35,000 men on the banks of the Antietam, near Sharpsburg — a village ten miles north-east of Harper's Ferry. McClellan, pressing him hard with an army four times his own numbers-composed in part of raw levies and hastily-massed militia, and in part of the veterans of the armies of the Potomacseemed determined on battle. Trusting in the valor and reliability of his troops, and feeling the weakness of being pressed by an enemy he might chastise, the southern chief
1 2 3 4 5 6