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by the accurate fire of the Louisianians and McLaws' veterans — the head of the column went down, only to be filled by the gallant fellows behind. Into the jaws of death they came, up to the very works-then, with half their number dead and dying about their feet, they broke, the left gave way-and the bloody field was won at all points. The victory was terrible and complete. But it had cost dear, and the rejoicing in Richmond was tempered with sorrow for the loss of such as Maxcy Gregg, Cobb, and many others, lying cold upon the field of victory. And with the first feeling of triumph the news brought, came the thought that this time surely the enemy would be pushed-this time he was indeed a prey! Broken and demoralized, with a deep river in his rear that he must cross in pontoons, the people felt that he could surely be destroyed before reaching his Stafford stronghold. But once again, as ever, the shattered and broken legions of Burnside were allowed two days to recover fr
mpetuosity of the ragged rebels --nerved by the memories of this field's old glories --toned up by the Seven Days, and delirious with the glow of present victory-sweeps the Federal back and doubles his line. It breaksfresh regiments pour in with deadly shot and fearful yell; the Federal line melts into confusion-rout! and the Second Manassas is won. The victory was as complete as that of the year before; an absolute rout was only saved the Federals by falling back to the reserve under Franklin, when the retreat became more orderly, as there was no pursuit. The solid fruits of the victory were the annihilation of all the plans of the gong-sounder, and the complete destruction of the new Onto-Richmond; the capture of over 7,000 prisoners-paroled on the field-and his admitted total loss of 28,000 men. New glories, too, shone around the names of Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, Hood, Kemper and Jenkins; and the efficient aid and splendid fighting of the cavalry of Stuart, Hampton an
Maxcy Gregg (search for this): chapter 29
ad, swept by the accurate fire of the Louisianians and McLaws' veterans — the head of the column went down, only to be filled by the gallant fellows behind. Into the jaws of death they came, up to the very works-then, with half their number dead and dying about their feet, they broke, the left gave way-and the bloody field was won at all points. The victory was terrible and complete. But it had cost dear, and the rejoicing in Richmond was tempered with sorrow for the loss of such as Maxcy Gregg, Cobb, and many others, lying cold upon the field of victory. And with the first feeling of triumph the news brought, came the thought that this time surely the enemy would be pushed-this time he was indeed a prey! Broken and demoralized, with a deep river in his rear that he must cross in pontoons, the people felt that he could surely be destroyed before reaching his Stafford stronghold. But once again, as ever, the shattered and broken legions of Burnside were allowed two days to
he day. Outnumbered and shattered, but unconquered still, the Confederates could not advance from the field they had held at such bitter cost. And when night stopped the aimless; carnage, each army, too crippled to renew the fight, withdrew toward its base. McClellan could not pursue; and the Confederates fell back doggedly, sullenly, and recrossed into Virginia. As usual in the North, a wild howl went up against McClellan. In response to this brutumfulmen, he was promptly removed by Halleck, for not conquering an army that had proved itself invincible! Bitter indeed was the hour that brought to Richmond the story of Sharpsburg. Flushed with hope, undoubting of triumph, her citizens; only listened for the wild cheer that would echo back from conquered Washington. But the sound that reached their ears was the menacing roar from retreating ranks that left near one-third their number stark and ghastly on that grim field, where the Death Angel has so darkly flapped his wings.
r Franklin, when the retreat became more orderly, as there was no pursuit. The solid fruits of the victory were the annihilation of all the plans of the gong-sounder, and the complete destruction of the new Onto-Richmond; the capture of over 7,000 prisoners-paroled on the field-and his admitted total loss of 28,000 men. New glories, too, shone around the names of Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, Hood, Kemper and Jenkins; and the efficient aid and splendid fighting of the cavalry of Stuart, Hampton and Bev Robinson, here proved that arm to have reached its point of highest efficiency. The heart of the South, still throbbing with triumph after the Seven Days and their bright corollary of Cedar Mountain, went up in one wild throb of joyous thanksgiving. So satisfied were the people of the sagacity of their leaders and the invincible valor of their troops; so carried away were they by the splendid reflection from the glory over Manassas plain — that this time they never even stopped
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 29
t the expected advance of Lee toward the Capital. Without resting his army, the latter divided it into three corps, under command of Jackson, Longstreet and A. P. Hill; and moved rapidly toward the accomplishment of that cherished hope of the southern people — an offensive campaign on the enemy's soil. Jackson passed with and feeling the weakness of being pressed by an enemy he might chastise, the southern chief calmly awaited the attacksend-ing couriers to hasten the advance of A. P. Hill, Walker and McLaws, whose divisions had not yet come up. Ushered in by a heavy attack the evening before — which was heavily repulsed-the morning of the 17tf pines. On these hills, Lee massed his artillery, to sweep the whole plain where the enemy must form, after his crossing; and arranged his line of battle with A. P. Hill holding the right and Longstreet the left. On the night of December 10th, Stafford Heights opened a furious bombardment of the town, tearing great gaps through
D. H. Hill (search for this): chapter 29
ial press. Secure and confident in the army that was to work their oracle, the hope of the South already drew triumphant pictures of defeated armies, harassed states, and a peace dictated from the Federal Capital. On the 14th of September, D. H. Hill, of Longstreet's corpsstationed at Boonesboro to protect Jackson's flank — was attacked by a heavy force. Heavily outnumbered, Hill fought a dogged and obstinate battle-giving and taking terrific blows, only ceasing when night stopped the fighHill fought a dogged and obstinate battle-giving and taking terrific blows, only ceasing when night stopped the fight. It was hard to tell which side had the best of the actual fighting; but the great object was gained and the next day Harper's Ferry, with its heavy garrison and immense supply of arms, stores and munitions, was surrendered to Jackson. Great was the joy in Richmond when the news of the brilliant fight at Boonesboro — the first passage of arms on Maryland soiland of the capture of the great arsenal of the North reached her anxious people. It was, they felt, but the presage of the great a
ching crescent that pours its ceaseless rain of fire through them; while the great guns behind its center thunder and roll In the very glee of war, sending death-winged bolts tearing and crushing through them. Through the carnival of death Hood has sent his Texans and Georgians at a run-their wild yells rending the dull roar of the fight; their bayonets flashing in a jagged line of light like hungry teeth! Jackson has swung gradually round the enemy's right; and Stephen Lee's artillery the gong-sounder, and the complete destruction of the new Onto-Richmond; the capture of over 7,000 prisoners-paroled on the field-and his admitted total loss of 28,000 men. New glories, too, shone around the names of Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, Hood, Kemper and Jenkins; and the efficient aid and splendid fighting of the cavalry of Stuart, Hampton and Bev Robinson, here proved that arm to have reached its point of highest efficiency. The heart of the South, still throbbing with triumph aft
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 29
dericksburg and its effect on the people why on pursuit? Hooker replaces Burnside death of Stonewall Jackson. Of such up in the North; then the inevitable result had come. Joseph Hooker was now the coming man — the war-gong was sounded more cure impatience for the moment when the roads would permit Hooker to advance. And the South waited, too — not hopefully,grasp them. At last the movement came. Late in April, Hooker divided his immense army into two columns, one menacing ris right wing-while the left was confided to General Slocum-Hooker rapidly crossed the river, concentrating not less than 60,leswould have shown complete defeat, even annihilation, of Hooker's right. But it was not so written in the Book of Lifefalling night, opportunity for partial reorganization. Hooker's right was turned and doubled upon his center; but he wasannock resulted in complete defeat of Sedgwick. Still, Hooker was permitted to withdraw his army across the river; but t
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 29
uit? Hooker replaces Burnside death of Stonewall Jackson. Of such vast import to the southern passage of that river. After Cedar Mountain, Jackson had disappeared as if the earth had swallowed and rolling-stock given to feed the flames. Jackson was in Pope's rear! This Confederate corpbt that he could turn upon the small force of Jackson and crush it before Lee could advance to his th instances. The attack, however, warned Jackson of the enemy's purpose and of his own criticattacks of the enemy's cavalry, and in keeping Jackson advised of the course of Pope's retreat-or adin a jagged line of light like hungry teeth! Jackson has swung gradually round the enemy's right; glories, too, shone around the names of Lee, Jackson, Longstreet, Hood, Kemper and Jenkins; and thn offensive campaign on the enemy's soil. Jackson passed with his accustomed swiftness to the ore-enforced; and then, on the 2d of May, Stonewall Jackson completed that wonderful and painful cir[6 more...]
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