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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death.. Search the whole document.

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Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 32
enlisted on British soil and under that flag, thousands of emigrants males only; with expenses and bounty paid by United States recruiting agents — were poured out of British territory each month. When France sent her circular to England and Russia, suggesting that the time had come for mediation, the former summarily rejected the proposition. Besides, England's treatment of the southern commissioners was coldly neglectful; and — from the beginning to the end of the Confederacy, the sole a fixed as was that of England; and though she may have hesitated, for a time, at the tempting bait offered-monopoly of southern cotton and tobacco — the reasons coercing that policy were too strong to let her swallow it at last. For the rest, Russia had always openly sympathized with the North; and other European nations had very vague notions of the merits of the struggle; less interest in its termination; and least of all, sympathy with what to them was mere rebellion. And this true co<
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
blockade. The early capture of her .river forts blocked access to her wharves, almost effectually; though occasional steamers still slipped up to them. Yet, she was in such easy reach of her more open neighbors, as to reap part of the bad fruits with which they were so overstocked. These proud southern cities had ever been famed throughout the land, for purity, high tone and unyielding pride. At the first bugleblast, their men had sprung to arms with one accord; and the best blood of Georgia and the Carolinas was poured out from Munson's Hill to Chickamauga. Their devoted women pinched themselves and stripped their homes, to aid the cause so sacred to them; and on the burning sand-hills of Charleston harbor, grandsire and grandson wrought side by side under blistering sun and galling fire alike! How bitter, then, for those devoted and mourning cities to see their sacred places made mere marts; their cherished fame jeopardied by refuse stay-at-homes, or transient aliens; wh
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
my one hundred and fifty miles from its base, to get in rear of Vicksburg and cut off its relief. The very audacity of this plan may blind the careless thinker to its bad generalship; especially in view of the success that at last crowned its projector's hammer-and-tongs style of tactics. His reckless and ill-handled assaults upon the strong works at Vicksburg-so freely criticised on his own side, by army and by press — were but preface of a volume, so bloodily written to the end before Petersburg. Under ordinary combinations, Johnston had found it easy to crush Grant and prevent even his escape to the distant base behind him. But, unhappily, Government would not re-enforce Johnstoneven to the very limited extent it might; and Mr. Davis promoted Pemberton to a lieutenant-generalcy and sent him to Vicksburg. But this is no place to discuss General Pemberton's abilities-his alleged disobedience of orders — the disasters of Baker's creek and Big Black; or his shutting up in Vicksb
Venice (Italy) (search for this): chapter 32
mania for exchanging paper money for something that could be enjoyed, grew apace as the war progressed. Fancy articles for dress, table luxuries and frippery of all sorts came now into great demand. Their importation increased to such bulk as, at last, to exclude the more necessary parts of most cargoes; and not less to threaten complete demoralization of such minority as made any money. It may seem a grim joke;--the starving, tattered-moribund Confederacy passing sumptuary laws, as had Venice in her recklessness of riches! But, in 1864, a law was necessitated against importation of all articles, not of utility; forbidden luxuries being named per schedule. That its constant evasion --if not its open defiance — was very simple, may be understood; for the blockade firms had now become a power coequal with Government, and exceptions were listed, sufficient to become the rule. And so the leeches waxed fat and flourished on the very lifeblood of the cause, that represented to the
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 32
secretary fostered the widest latitude in press-rumors thereanent, but deemed it politic to forget contradiction, when — as was invariably the case — the next blockade-runner brought flat denial of all that its precedent had carried. Still, constant promises with no fulfillment, added to limited private correspondence with foreign capitals, begat mistrust in elusive theories, which was rudely changed to simple certainty. Edwin DeLeon had been sent by Mr. Davis on a special mission to London and Paris, after Mr. Yancey's return; his action to be independent of the regularly established futility. In August, 1863, full despatches from him, to the southern President and State Department, were captured and published in the New York papers. These came through the lines and gave the southern people the full and clear expose of the foreign question, as it had long been fully and clearly known to their government. This publication intensified what had been vague opposition to fur
Atlantic Ocean (search for this): chapter 32
the spy system female agents. Potent factor in sapping the foundations of Confederate hope and of Confederate credit, was the blockade. First held in contempt; later fruitful mother of errors, as to the movements and intentions of European powers; ever the growing constrictor-whose coil was slowly, but surely, to crush out life-it became each year harder to bear :--at last unbearable! At first, Mr. Lincoln's proclamation was laughed to scorn at the South. The vast extent of South Atlantic and Gulf coast-pierced with innumerable safe harbors-seemed to defy any scheme for hermetic sealing. The limited Federal navy was powerless to do more than keep loose watch over ports of a few large cities; and, if these were even effectually closed, it was felt that new ones would open, on every hand, inviting the ventures of enterprising sailors. This reasoning had good basis, at first; and-had the South made prompt and efficient use of opportunity and resources at hand, by placin
Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
Chapter 31: the Chinese-Wall blockade, abroad and at home. Foundation errors lost opportunity the Treaty of Paris view first southern commissioners doubts the Mason Slidell incident Mr. Benjamin's foreign policy Deleon's captured despatches murmurs loud and deep England's attitude other great Powers Mr. Davis' view if interest of the Powers the Optimist view production and speculation blockade companies sumptuary laws growth of evil power Charleston and Savannah llegality equal to its inefficiency, they were convinced that either could be demonstrated to Europe. And here let us glance briefly at the South's suicidal foreign policy; and at the feeling of other people regarding it. Under the Treaty of Paris, no blockade was de facto, or to be recognized, unless it was demonstrated to be effectual closing of the port, or ports, named. Now, in the South, were one or two ships, at most, before the largest ports; with an average of one vessel for every
Chickamauga (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
o her wharves, almost effectually; though occasional steamers still slipped up to them. Yet, she was in such easy reach of her more open neighbors, as to reap part of the bad fruits with which they were so overstocked. These proud southern cities had ever been famed throughout the land, for purity, high tone and unyielding pride. At the first bugleblast, their men had sprung to arms with one accord; and the best blood of Georgia and the Carolinas was poured out from Munson's Hill to Chickamauga. Their devoted women pinched themselves and stripped their homes, to aid the cause so sacred to them; and on the burning sand-hills of Charleston harbor, grandsire and grandson wrought side by side under blistering sun and galling fire alike! How bitter, then, for those devoted and mourning cities to see their sacred places made mere marts; their cherished fame jeopardied by refuse stay-at-homes, or transient aliens; while vile speculation-ineffably greedy, when not boldly dishonest-
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
ven to rebel ingenuity and audacity. It needed but careful guard over the third side — the inland border from river to coast — to seal up the South hermetically, and perfect her isolation. That perfection had long been attempted. Fleets of gunboats ploughed the Potomac and all inland water-approaches to the southern frontier. A shrewd detective system, ramifying from Washington, penetrated the disaffected counties of Maryland; spying equally upon shore and household. The borders of Tennessee and Kentucky were closely picketed; and no means of cunning, or perseverance, were omitted to prevent the passage of anything living, or useful, into the South. But none of this availed against the untiring pluck and audacity of the inland blockade-breakers. Daily the lines were forced, spies evaded, and bold Johnny Reb passed back and forth, in almost guaranteed security. Such ventures brought small supplies of much-needed medicines, surgical instruments and necessaries for the sick
errors, as to the movements and intentions of European powers; ever the growing constrictor-whose coll glowing hopes of immediate recognition from Europe. But there was none, as yet, relative to her tion of the South was actually unprecedented. Europe felt the delicacy-and equally the dangerof intus of the growing power of the American Union, Europe may, moreover, have heard dictates of the polirench emperor's movements to feel the pulse of Europe, from time to time, on the question of mediati openly sympathized with the North; and other European nations had very vague notions of the merits t, only played with by the skilled sophists of Europe. And, ere the end came, that absolute convicts of thinkers settled the dark conviction that Europe saw her best interest, in standing by to watchher, said the South, the better will it please Europe; and the only faith in her at last, was that s Nor can thinkers, on either side, cavil at Europe's policy during that war; calculating, selfish[5 more...]
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