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Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
of interest, every tie of sympathy — as already one of the Confederate States. She was no longer neutral, they said. She had put her lance in rest and rallied to the charge, in the avowed quarrel that the troops attacked were on their way to oppress her next sister. And nothing could follow but Virginia's bright falchion must flash out, and the states must lock shields and press between her and the giant she had roused. The Gulf City had not been idle. The echo of the first gun at Charleston had roused her people; and with a wonderful accord they had sprung to arms. Law books were thrown aside, merchants locked up their ledgers, even students of theology forgot that they were men of peace-and all enrolled themselves in the crack companies. No wonder, when the very best blood of the state ran in the veins of the humblest private; when men of letters and culture and wealth refused any but the post of honor, with musket on shoulder; when the most delicate fingers of their fair
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 7: Mobile, the Gulf city. Echo from Maryland Alabama's preparation Mobile's crack corps John Forsyth on the peace commissioners Mobile society pleasure-lovers and their pleasures a victim of the tiger two moral axioms. Mobile was in a state of perfect ferment when we arrived. The news from Maryland had made profound sensation and had dissipated the delusive hopes-indulged there as well as in Montgomery-like mists before the sun. All now agreed that war must come. Many thought it already upon them. Groups, anxious and steadfast, filled the hotels, the clubs and the post-office; and the sense of all was that Maryland had spoken not one hour too soon; having spoken, the simple duty of the South was to prevent harm to a hair of her head for words said in its defense. Those who had been the hottest in branding the action of Virginia as laggard, looked to her for the steadiest and most efficient aid, now that the crisis faced them; while all felt she wo
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
town, we met the cussed decoy again, and we were fools enough to go again-- Williz molley-damniz-hic-eyes! interpolated the other. -- And we got broke again-and this fellow that hollowed Muggins looked like the decoy, but he wasn't. That's the whole truth, Mr. Styles. Mussput-hic-fi dollus on-jack? remarked Spring Chicken. See yer, Styse-o'boy, damfattolman-con'l is! and he curled from the lounge to the floor and slept peacefully. My young friend, remarked Styles gravely to the middie, as we tucked the insensible Spring Chicken into his berth-If you want to gamble, you'll do it-so I don't advise you. But these amphibious beasts are dangerous; so in future play with gentlemen and let them alone. And, my boy, said the colonel, enunciating his moral lesson-gambling is bad enough, egad! but any man is lost-yes, sir, lost! --who will drink mint-after dinner! With which great moral axioms we retired and slept until our steamer reached the Queen city of the South.
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
colonel looked over his newspaper at breakfast and said: Last day, boys! Egad! the cooking here is a little different from Montgomery-but we must take the Cuba this evening. So adieux were spoken, and at dusk we went aboard the snug, neat little Gulf steamer of the New Orleans line. She was a trimmer craft than our floating card-house of river travel, built for a little outside work in case of necessity, or the chances of a norther. We scudded merrily down the bay toward Fort Morgan, the grim sentinel sitting dark and lonely at the harbor's mouth and showing a row of teeth that might be a warning. The fort was now put in thorough repair and readiness by Colonel Hardee, of the regular army of the Confederate States. I was following Styles down from the upper deck, when we heard high voices from the end of the boat, and recognized one exclaiming: Curse you! I'll cut your ear off! Round the open bar we found an excited crowd, in the center of which was
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ll regiments and helped to fill up others. The news from Virginia and Maryland had given but a fresh impetus to these preparations and, before my return to Montgomery, these regiments had passed through, on their way to the new battle ground on the Potomac frontier. On the night of our arrival in the Gulf City, that escape valve for all excitement, a dense crowd, collected in front of the Battle House and Colonel John Forsyth addressed them from the balcony. He had just returned from Washington with the southern commissioners and gave, he said, a true narrative of the manner and results of their mission. At this lapse of time it is needless to detail even the substance of his speech; but it made a marked impression on the crowd, as the surging sea of upturned faces plainly told. John Forsyth, already acknowledged one of the ablest of southern leaders, was a veritable Harry Hotspur. His views brooked no delay or temporizing; and, as he spoke, in vein of fiery elegance, shouts a
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 7: Mobile, the Gulf city. Echo from Maryland Alabama's preparation Mobile's crack corps John Forsyth on Mobile's crack corps John Forsyth on the peace commissioners Mobile society pleasure-lovers and their pleasures a victim of the tiger two moral axioms. MoMobile society pleasure-lovers and their pleasures a victim of the tiger two moral axioms. Mobile was in a state of perfect ferment when we arrived. The news from Maryland had made profound sensation and had dissipatMobile was in a state of perfect ferment when we arrived. The news from Maryland had made profound sensation and had dissipated the delusive hopes-indulged there as well as in Montgomery-like mists before the sun. All now agreed that war must co as; Leporello's. Not one in ten of the best born youth of Mobile remained at home; the mechanics, the stevedores and men ofclared; and play could be found, too, as needed; for young Mobile was not slow, and money., in those days, was plenty. Altogether, the tone of Mobile society was more cosmopolitan than that of any city of the South, save, perhaps, New Orleans. water before her, the cleanly-built, unpaved streets gave Mobile a fresh, cool aspect. The houses were fine and their appo
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
d, now that the crisis faced them; while all felt she would meet the calls of the hour with never a pause for the result. The sanguine counted on Maryland, bound by every community of interest, every tie of sympathy — as already one of the Confederate States. She was no longer neutral, they said. She had put her lance in rest and rallied to the charge, in the avowed quarrel that the troops attacked were on their way to oppress her next sister. And nothing could follow but Virginia's bright fbay toward Fort Morgan, the grim sentinel sitting dark and lonely at the harbor's mouth and showing a row of teeth that might be a warning. The fort was now put in thorough repair and readiness by Colonel Hardee, of the regular army of the Confederate States. I was following Styles down from the upper deck, when we heard high voices from the end of the boat, and recognized one exclaiming: Curse you! I'll cut your ear off! Round the open bar we found an excited crowd, in the cent
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
as never made aware of that, for it ever sedulously remembered good taste. Between the drives, dinners and other time-killers, one week slipped around with great rapidity; and we could hardly realize it when the colonel looked over his newspaper at breakfast and said: Last day, boys! Egad! the cooking here is a little different from Montgomery-but we must take the Cuba this evening. So adieux were spoken, and at dusk we went aboard the snug, neat little Gulf steamer of the New Orleans line. She was a trimmer craft than our floating card-house of river travel, built for a little outside work in case of necessity, or the chances of a norther. We scudded merrily down the bay toward Fort Morgan, the grim sentinel sitting dark and lonely at the harbor's mouth and showing a row of teeth that might be a warning. The fort was now put in thorough repair and readiness by Colonel Hardee, of the regular army of the Confederate States. I was following Styles down from the
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
me are now written the names of the Mobile Cadets — of the Gulf City Guards--of the Rifles-and enough others to make the list as long as; Leporello's. Not one in ten of the best born youth of Mobile remained at home; the mechanics, the stevedores and men of every class flocked to follow their example, so that the city alone gave two, full regiments and helped to fill up others. The news from Virginia and Maryland had given but a fresh impetus to these preparations and, before my return to Montgomery, these regiments had passed through, on their way to the new battle ground on the Potomac frontier. On the night of our arrival in the Gulf City, that escape valve for all excitement, a dense crowd, collected in front of the Battle House and Colonel John Forsyth addressed them from the balcony. He had just returned from Washington with the southern commissioners and gave, he said, a true narrative of the manner and results of their mission. At this lapse of time it is needless to det
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
he simple duty of the South was to prevent harm to a hair of her head for words said in its defense. Those who had been the hottest in branding the action of Virginia as laggard, looked to her for the steadiest and most efficient aid, now that the crisis faced them; while all felt she would meet the calls of the hour with nevence in rest and rallied to the charge, in the avowed quarrel that the troops attacked were on their way to oppress her next sister. And nothing could follow but Virginia's bright falchion must flash out, and the states must lock shields and press between her and the giant she had roused. The Gulf City had not been idle. The e stevedores and men of every class flocked to follow their example, so that the city alone gave two, full regiments and helped to fill up others. The news from Virginia and Maryland had given but a fresh impetus to these preparations and, before my return to Montgomery, these regiments had passed through, on their way to the new
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