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French had been sent with the greater part of his cavalry to the mouth of the Conewago to burn two railroad bridges at that point and all others between there and York. Before reaching town Hays' and Smith's brigades were ordered into camp about two miles on the north of it at some mills near the railroad. Hoke's brigade under n reaching Hanover Junction and destroying the depot at that place and one or two bridges in the vicinity, but he did not destroy all the bridges between there and York, as one or two of them, as reported by him, were defended by a force of infantry. Colonel French succeeded in destroying the bridges over the Conewago at its mouth, and all between there and York, and on the 29th he was sent to complete the destruction of the bridges south of the town, over the Codorus, which he succeeded in doing, as the force defending them had retired. In compliance with my requisition some twelve or fifteen hundred pairs of shoes, all the hats, socks, and rations c
raxton's battalions had performed wonders. This affair occurred about 11 A. M., and a splendid victory had been gained. The ground in front was strewn with the enemy's dead and wounded, and some prisoners had been taken. But on our side, Major General Rodes had been killed, in the very moment of triumph, while conducting the attack of his division with great gallantry and skill, and this was a heavy blow to me. Brigadier General Godwin of Ramseur's division had been killed, and Brigadier General York of Gordon's division had lost an arm. Other brave men and officers had fallen, and we could illy bear the loss of any of them. Had I then had a fresh body of troops to push our victory, the day would have been ours, but in this action, in the early part of the day, I had present only about 7,000 muskets, about 2,000 cavalry and two battalions of artillery with about 30 guns; and they had all been engaged. Wharton's division and King's artillery had not arrived, and Imboden's cav
's Company 460, 461 Woodstock, 368, 430, 454 Wounding of Jackson, 212 Wright, General, 83, 231, 233, 255, 257 Wright, General (U. S. A.), 392, 393 Wrightsville 235, 255, 259, 260-61- 262-63-64 Wynn, Captain, 215 Wynn's Mill, 60, 61, 62, 63 Wytheville, 466, 467 Yates' Ford, 12, 13 York, 253, 255, 258-64, 267 York, General, 423 York River, 57-58-59, 65 York River R. R., 77 York Road, 269-71, 273, 357 Young's Branch, 26 Zoar Church, 318-20, 322-23-24 s Company 460, 461 Woodstock, 368, 430, 454 Wounding of Jackson, 212 Wright, General, 83, 231, 233, 255, 257 Wright, General (U. S. A.), 392, 393 Wrightsville 235, 255, 259, 260-61- 262-63-64 Wynn, Captain, 215 Wynn's Mill, 60, 61, 62, 63 Wytheville, 466, 467 Yates' Ford, 12, 13 York, 253, 255, 258-64, 267 York, General, 423 York River, 57-58-59, 65 York River R. R., 77 York Road, 269-71, 273, 357 Young's Branch, 26 Zoar Church, 318-20, 322-23-24
es, and I was assigned to the command of that part of the line extending from the ravine south of Yorktown to the right of Wynn's Mill as far as the mouth of the branch leading into the pond made by Dam No. 1, which was the first dam below that at Wynn's Mill. There were two dams on the line thus assigned me, the dam at Wynn's Mill, etc. The troops defending the part of the line thus assigned me consisted of Rodes' brigade; my own, now under the command of Colonel D. K. McRae, of the 5th North ansferred to another part of the line in a few days. The only portions of my line exposed to the view of the enemy were Redoubts Nos. 4 and 5 and the works attached to them, the works at Wynn's Mill and part of a small work at the upper dam of Wynn's Millthe works at Wynn's Mill and the upper dam with the intervening space being occupied by Wilcox's command. Between the works designated, including Dam No. 1, the swamps on both sides of Warwick River were thickly wooded, and it would have be
the pike, it gave me the inside track, and I caught his horse as he reached the pike, which he was approaching at an acute angle. Just as I caught the reins, Captain Wynn rode up on the opposite side of him and caught hold of the reins on that side, almost simultaneously. By this time the confusion was over and all was quiet, auld not be kept still, as he was frightened and suffering from his own wounds. As General Jackson fell over on me, I caught him in my arms, and held him until Captain Wynn could get his feet out of the stirrups, then we carried him in our arms some 10 or 15 steps north of the pike, where he was laid on the ground, resting his hea while I proceeded to dress his wounds, cutting off his coat sleeves, and binding a handkerchief tightly above and below his wound and putting his arm in a sling. Wynn went for Dr. McGuire and an ambulance, and I was left alone with him until General Hill came up. Just before Hill reached us, Jackson revived a little and asked me
n (U. S. A.), 408-09, 417 Wilson, Major J. P., 144, 150, 187 Winchester, 163~ 240-41, 243-44, 249- 253, 284, 333-34, 367-70, 382, 385, 391, 397-400, 406, 408, 410, 412- 414, 417, 419-20, 425-26, 435, 439, 450-453, 455, 457, 475 Winchester & Potomac R. R., 163, 368, 414 Winder, General, 94, 95, 96, 97 Winston, Captain, 148 Winston, Colonel, 60 Wirz, Captain, 296, 297, 298 Wise, General, 76, 132 Woffard's Brigade, 444, 446, 449 Wolf Run Shoals, 10, 47, 48, 50 Woodson's Company 460, 461 Woodstock, 368, 430, 454 Wounding of Jackson, 212 Wright, General, 83, 231, 233, 255, 257 Wright, General (U. S. A.), 392, 393 Wrightsville 235, 255, 259, 260-61- 262-63-64 Wynn, Captain, 215 Wynn's Mill, 60, 61, 62, 63 Wytheville, 466, 467 Yates' Ford, 12, 13 York, 253, 255, 258-64, 267 York, General, 423 York River, 57-58-59, 65 York River R. R., 77 York Road, 269-71, 273, 357 Young's Branch, 26 Zoar Church, 318-20, 322-23-24
, we were satisfied that the troops lying so close up to the position of the enemy were Confederates, and it turned out that they consisted of Generals Mahone and Wright of Huger's division with parts of their brigades. The whole force with them only amounted to a few hundred, and this body constituted the whole of our troops makhey had won, after mingling their dead with those of the enemy at the very mouths of his guns, and when the enemy finally retired this small body under Mahone and Wright remained the actual masters of the fight. Before the enemy did retire, a messenger came from Generals Mahone and Wright, with a request for the commander of the Wright, with a request for the commander of the troops on the part of the field where I was to advance, stating that the enemy was retreating and that but a rear guard occupied the position. I was, however, too weak to comply with the request, especially as I was informed that their ammunition was exhausted. Shortly after light, General Ewell came in a great hurry to with
, but it did not cross to the Plank road until dark, when I saw Posey's brigade moving up the hill on my, then, left from the direction of Downman's house, and it took position above me on the Plank road, the enemy having retired from that road. Wright's brigade was subsequently moved across to the Plank road at eight or nine o'clock and took position on Posey's left. The main attack had been made by my three brigades. The force which I encountered in front in this action was Howe's divisioed on the south bank but Hooker's force above. Some of McLaws' brigades had advanced toward Banks' Ford during the night, picking up some prisoners, and some pieces of artillery had opened on the enemy's bridge as he was recrossing. Posey's and Wright's brigades had also advanced towards Banks' Ford, picking up some prisoners. Next morning a number of prisoners were gathered who had been left behind when the main force crossed, some of them being taken on the river by detachments from Gordon'
ement to our left was a feint and that there was a real movement of the enemy towards our right. Before daybreak on the morning of the 12th, Wilcox's brigades were returned to him, and at dawn Mahone's division was moved to the right, leaving Wright's brigade of that division to cover the crossing of the Po on Field's left. On this morning, the enemy made a very heavy attack on Ewell's front, and the line where it was occupied by Johnson's division. A portion of the attacking force swept af his manoeuvring in my front. It unites with the Po, a few miles to the east and south of Spottsylvania Court-House, and both streams are difficult to cross except where there are bridges. Another reconnaissance, handsomely made by Brigadier General Wright, who had been brought from the left, ascertained that a heavy force of the enemy was between the Ny and the Po, in front of my right, which was held by Mahone, and was along the road towards Hanover Junction. To meet this movement of th
egard to the force of Wallace at Monocacy, he says: His force was not sufficient to ensure success, but he fought the enemy nevertheless, and although it resulted in a defeat to our arms, yet it detained the enemy and thereby served to enable General Wright to reach Washington with two divisions of the 6th corps, and the advance of the 19th corps before him. Stanton says in his report: Here (at Washington) they (we) were met by troops from the Army of the Potomac, consisting of the 6th corps under General Wright, a part of the 8th corps under General Gilmore and a part of the 19th corps, just arrived from New Orleans under General Emory. Taking Grant's statement of the troops which had arrived from his army, they were sufficient to hold the works against my troops, at least until others could arrive. But in addition to those which had already arrived, there were the detachments from the invalid corps, called, I believe, the Veteran reserves (of which I was informed there were 5,0
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