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to the left from the old Stone Pike to the Germana Ford road, the enemy, in heavy force, was encountered, and Jones' brigade, of Johnson's division, and Battle's brigade, of Rodes' division, were driven back in some confusion. My division was ordered up, and formed across the pike, Gordon's brigade being on the right of the road. This brigade, as soon as it was brought into line, was ordered forward, and advanced through a dense pine thicket in gallant style. In conjunction with Daniel's, Doles' and Ramseur's brigades, of Rodes' division, it drove the enemy back with heavy loss, capturing several hundred prisoners, and gaining a commanding position on the right. Johnson, at the same time, was heavily engaged in his front, his division being on the left of the pike and extending across the road to the Germana Ford road, which has been mentioned. After the enemy had been repulsed, Hays' brigade was sent to Johnson's left, in order to participate in a forward movement; and it did mo
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 33
tion from which he had been driven; and the fighting extended to General Lee's right on the Plank road. Gordon occupied the position which hrprise, a serious disaster would befall, not only our corps, but General Lee's whole army. In the afternoon, when the column threatening our leaving our front and moving towards Spottsylvania Court-House. General Lee's army was also put in motion, Ewell's corps moving along the li. Hill, who was sick and unable to remain on duty, an order from General Lee, transferring Hays' brigade from my division to Johnson's, in orleft with it, and assumed command of Hill's corps. Grant says General Lee had the advantage of position. As the latter had to move from hage of position, after the two days fighting? He also says that General Lee was enabled to reach Spottsylvania Court-House first, because hesession of the direct road to that place, and he had the start. General Lee had to move on the circuitous route by Shady Grove, and he was e
R. D. Johnston (search for this): chapter 33
take steps to prevent its getting to our rear; and Johnston's brigade, of Rodes' division, which had just arri my division; and, during my absence while posting Johnston's brigade, he reported the fact to General Ewell, ined to make it with Gordon's brigade supported by Johnston's and to follow it up, if successful, with the ref the woods in which the enemy's right rested, and Johnston's in the rear, with orders to follow Gordon and obthrown into disorder. In going through the woods, Johnston had obliqued too much and passed to Gordon's left,ance of Pegram's brigade, and the demonstration of Johnston's brigade in the rear, where it encountered a partks in front of my whole line and a good portion of Johnston's. Between the lines a large number of his dead ha abandoned the left side of the road, across which Johnston's line extended, and my division and a part of hisier general had been killed in the Wilderness, and Johnston's brigade from Rodes' division to mine; and assign
mn of the enemy's infantry was moving between our left and the river, with the apparent purpose of turning our left flank; and information was also received that Burnside's corps had crossed the river, and was in rear of the enemy's right. I received directions to watch this column, and take steps to prevent its getting to our reoned to me by General Ewell, and I stated to him the danger and risk of making the attack under the circumstances, as a column was threatening our left flank and Burnside's corps was in rear of the enemy's flank, on which the attack was suggested. General Ewell concurred with me in this opinion, and the impolicy of the attempt atl, not only our corps, but General Lee's whole army. In the afternoon, when the column threatening our left had been withdrawn, and it had been ascertained that Burnside had gone to Grant's left, on account of the heavy fighting on that flank, at my suggestion, General Ewell ordered the movement which Gordon had proposed. I dete
Robert E. Rodes (search for this): chapter 33
ncountered, and Jones' brigade, of Johnson's division, and Battle's brigade, of Rodes' division, were driven back in some confusion. My division was ordered up, andgallant style. In conjunction with Daniel's, Doles' and Ramseur's brigades, of Rodes' division, it drove the enemy back with heavy loss, capturing several hundred pk, when he was withdrawn to the extreme left, and his place occupied by part of Rodes' division. The troops encountered, in the beginning of the fight, consistedabandoned by the enemy, just in front of the point at which Johnson's right and Rodes' left joined, and were subsequently secured by our troops. After the withdr, and take steps to prevent its getting to our rear; and Johnston's brigade, of Rodes' division, which had just arrived from Hanover Junction, was sent to me for tharigadier general had been killed in the Wilderness, and Johnston's brigade from Rodes' division to mine; and assigning me to the temporary command of Hill's corps, w
Chapter 32: battles of the Wilderness. On the morning of the 5th, Ewell's corps was put in motion, my division bringing up the rear. A short distance from the Old Wilderness Tavern, and just in advance of the place where a road diverges to the left from the old Stone Pike to the Germana Ford road, the enemy, in heavy force, was encountered, and Jones' brigade, of Johnson's division, and Battle's brigade, of Rodes' division, were driven back in some confusion. My division was ordered up, and formed across the pike, Gordon's brigade being on the right of the road. This brigade, as soon as it was brought into line, was ordered forward, and advanced through a dense pine thicket in gallant style. In conjunction with Daniel's, Doles' and Ramseur's brigades, of Rodes' division, it drove the enemy back with heavy loss, capturing several hundred prisoners, and gaining a commanding position on the right. Johnson, at the same time, was heavily engaged in his front, his division being o
from the old Stone Pike to the Germana Ford road, the enemy, in heavy force, was encountered, and Jones' brigade, of Johnson's division, and Battle's brigade, of Rodes' division, were driven back in some confusion. My division was ordered up, and formed across the pike, Gordon's brigade being on the right of the road. This brigade, as soon as it was brought into line, was ordered forward, and advanced through a dense pine thicket in gallant style. In conjunction with Daniel's, Doles' and Ramseur's brigades, of Rodes' division, it drove the enemy back with heavy loss, capturing several hundred prisoners, and gaining a commanding position on the right. Johnson, at the same time, was heavily engaged in his front, his division being on the left of the pike and extending across the road to the Germana Ford road, which has been mentioned. After the enemy had been repulsed, Hays' brigade was sent to Johnson's left, in order to participate in a forward movement; and it did move forward s
Richard S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 33
2: battles of the Wilderness. On the morning of the 5th, Ewell's corps was put in motion, my division bringing up the rears were brought to his assistance. At the close of the day, Ewell's corps had captured over a thousand prisonels, besides infp. During the morning, the fact was communicated to General Ewell, by our cavalry scouts, that a column of the enemy's inile posting Johnston's brigade, he reported the fact to General Ewell, and suggested the propriety of attacking this flank ofaged. On my return, the subject was mentioned to me by General Ewell, and I stated to him the danger and risk of making the the enemy's flank, on which the attack was suggested. General Ewell concurred with me in this opinion, and the impolicy of of the heavy fighting on that flank, at my suggestion, General Ewell ordered the movement which Gordon had proposed. I detenia Court-House. General Lee's army was also put in motion, Ewell's corps moving along the line occupied by our troops on the
Chapter 32: battles of the Wilderness. On the morning of the 5th, Ewell's corps was put in motion, my division bringing up the rear. A short distance from the Old Wilderness Tavern, and just in advance of the place where a road diverges to the left from the old Stone Pike to the Germana Ford road, the enemy, in heavy force, was encountered, and Jones' brigade, of Johnson's division, and Battle's brigade, of Rodes' division, were driven back in some confusion. My division was ordered up, and formed across the pike, Gordon's brigade being on the right of the road. This brigade, as soon as it was brought into line, was ordered forward, and advanced through a dense pine thicket in gallant style. In conjunction with Daniel's, Doles' and Ramseur's brigades, of Rodes' division, it drove the enemy back with heavy loss, capturing several hundred prisoners, and gaining a commanding position on the right. Johnson, at the same time, was heavily engaged in his front, his division being
right and Rodes' left joined, and were subsequently secured by our troops. After the withdrawal of Gordon's brigade from the right, the whole of my division was on the left of the road diverging from the pike, in extension of Johnson's line. All of my brigades had behaved handsomely; and Gordon's advance, at the time of the confusion in the beginning of the fight, was made with great energy and dispatch, and was just in time to prevent a serious disaster. Early on the morning of the 6th, the fighting was resumed, and a very heavy attack was made on the front occupied by Pegram's brigade (now under the command of Colonel Hoffman of the 31st Virginia Regiment); but it was handsomely repulsed, as were several subsequent attacks on the same point. These attacks were so persistent, that two regiments of Johnson's division were moved to the rear of Pegram's brigade, for the purpose of supporting it; and when an offer was made to relieve it, under the apprehension that its ammu
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