hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 414 2 Browse Search
Richard S. Ewell 411 1 Browse Search
J. B. Gordon 372 2 Browse Search
Harry T. Hays 361 1 Browse Search
Robert E. Rodes 282 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 233 13 Browse Search
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) 220 0 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 220 0 Browse Search
James Longstreet 218 4 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 183 11 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. Search the whole document.

Found 225 total hits in 76 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
the infantry of our army at and near that place was organized into four divisions of three brigades each and two corps. Bonham's brigade was attached to Van Dorn's division, and the command of the other divisions was given to Major Generals G. W. SGeneral Van Dorn was relieved from duty with the Army of the Potomac and ordered to the Trans-Mississippi Department, General Bonham succeeding to the command of the division as senior brigadier general. On the 30th of January, General Beauregard toArmy of the Potomac, but all division commanders reported directly to General Johnston. After the 1st of February General Bonham relinquished the command of the division, having resigned his commission to take his seat in Congress, and I succeeded to the command of the division as next in rank --Colonel Kershaw, who was appointed brigadier general, succeeding Bonham in the command of his brigade. My brigade had gone into temporary winter quarters at the point to which it had moved, when we
hat point and had the person bearing the flag brought to me blindfolded. He proved to be a Dr. Coxe, surgeon of the New Jersey regiment, a detachment of which had been engaged in the above named affair. He stated that he came on the part of Colonel Tyler of the 3rd New Jersey to get the bodies of several men who were missing, and that he was informed that General Kearney, who commanded on that part of the line, had directed Colonel Tyler to send the party with the flag. I informed him of Colonel Tyler to send the party with the flag. I informed him of the irregularity of the proceeding, but after some conversation in which I endeavored to leave him under the impression that we had a large force in the vicinity, I gave him permission to carry off the dead bodies, two of which he had picked up outside of my picket, and two others having been brought in to the picket before his arrival. We remained at Mason's Hill three or four days, and I was then relieved by Colonel Smith in command of the 20th Georgia Regiment. My pickets had been constant
GeneraMl Beauregard (search for this): chapter 6
former line north of that stream was re-occupied. The army at that time was known as the Army of the Potomac, and General Beauregard's command was reorganized as the 1st corps of that army, with the same brigade commanders as before. I was promotegstreet, and E. Kirby Smith, respectively. Van Dorn's and Longstreet's divisions constituted the first corps under General Beauregard, and the other two divisions constituted the second corps under the temporary command of Major General G. W. Smith.rict, under the command of General Johnston; the districts being assigned to the command of Major General Jafkson, GeneraMl Beauregard, and Major General Holmes, in the order in which they are named. Colonel Robert E. Rodes of the 5th Alabama Regiment, General Bonham succeeding to the command of the division as senior brigadier general. On the 30th of January, General Beauregard took leave of the Army of the Potomac, he having been ordered to Kentucky; and after this time there was no distinc
Earl Dorn (search for this): chapter 6
This advanced line of pickets was subsequently abandoned, after having been maintained for several weeks, but I did not again return to it. After leaving Mason's Hill, I moved back to my camp in front of Wolf Run Shoals, again occupying the right of our line. I remained on this flank until the fore part of October, and my regiments picketed at Springfield on the line of the railroad, alternating with those of Ewell's brigade at Langster's cross-roads. On the 4th of October Major General Earl Van Dorn joined our army and was assigned to the command of a division composed of Ewell's brigade and mine. This was the first division organized in the Army of the Potomac (Confederate) and I think in the entire Confederate army. In a day or two afterwards my brigade was moved to a position between Fairfax Station and Fairfax Court-House, and remained there until the army was moved back to the line which it occupied for the winter, my regiment picketing at Burke's Station on the railro
al G. W. Smith. About the same time, General Jackson, with the rank of Major General, was sent to the valley with his old brigade, and the 22nd of October an order was issued from the Adjutant General's office at Richmond, establishing the Department of Northern Virginia, composed of the Valley district, the Potomac district, and the Aquia district, under the command of General Johnston; the districts being assigned to the command of Major General Jafkson, GeneraMl Beauregard, and Major General Holmes, in the order in which they are named. Colonel Robert E. Rodes of the 5th Alabama Regiment had been made brigadier general and assigned to the command of Ewell's brigade, Ewell being temporarily assigned to a brigade in Longstreet's division, and subsequently made major general and transferred to the command of E. K. Smith's division, when the latter officer was sent to Tennessee. The affair of Evans' command with the enemy at Ball's Bluff occurred on the 21st of October, and St
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 6
Captain Holman reported to me. In the latter part of August, General Longstreet, who had command of the advanced forces at Fairfax Court-Housade was ordered to Fairfax Station, for the purpose of supporting Longstreet, if necessary. After being there a day, I was ordered by GeneralGeneral Longstreet to move with two of my regiments to Mason's Hill, to relieve one of his on duty at that place. I took with me the 24th Virginia ad of the other divisions was given to Major Generals G. W. Smith, Longstreet, and E. Kirby Smith, respectively. Van Dorn's and Longstreet's dLongstreet's divisions constituted the first corps under General Beauregard, and the other two divisions constituted the second corps under the temporary coEwell's brigade, Ewell being temporarily assigned to a brigade in Longstreet's division, and subsequently made major general and transferred eft to guard the crossing of the Rappahannock. G. W. Smith's and Longstreet's divisions had moved by the roads west of the railroad, and were
was composed of a battalion of infantry, a battalion of cavalry, and a battery of artillery, and remained south of the Occoquon on the right, and watched the lower fords of that stream and the landings on the Potomac immediately below Occoquon. Evans had occupied Leesburg. Captain W. W. Thornton's company of cavalry had been again attached to my command and subsequently, in the month of September, a battery of Virginia artillery under Captain Holman reported to me. In the latter part of Aell's brigade, Ewell being temporarily assigned to a brigade in Longstreet's division, and subsequently made major general and transferred to the command of E. K. Smith's division, when the latter officer was sent to Tennessee. The affair of Evans' command with the enemy at Ball's Bluff occurred on the 21st of October, and Stuart's affair with the enemy at Drainesville occurred on the 20th of December. These are the only conflicts of the Army of the Potomac with the enemy of any consequen
W. W. Thornton (search for this): chapter 6
a battalion of cavalry, and a battery of artillery, and remained south of the Occoquon on the right, and watched the lower fords of that stream and the landings on the Potomac immediately below Occoquon. Evans had occupied Leesburg. Captain W. W. Thornton's company of cavalry had been again attached to my command and subsequently, in the month of September, a battery of Virginia artillery under Captain Holman reported to me. In the latter part of August, General Longstreet, who had command until the army was moved back to the line which it occupied for the winter, my regiment picketing at Burke's Station on the railroad in the meantime. Soon after the organization of the division, Captain Green's company of cavalry, for which Thornton's had been exchanged, was relieved from duty with me and attached to General Van Dorn's headquarters. On the 7th of October, the 20tli Georgia Regiment, Colonel W. D. Smith, was attached to my brigade, and joined me in a day or two thereafter.
G. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 6
d Munson's Hills, in close proximity to the enemy's main line on the south of the Potomac. McClellan had succeeded McDowell, in command of the Federal Army opposed to us, and that army was being left above that point. We proceeded at once to fortify the whole line from right to left. McClellan's report shows that the troops under his command in and about Washington, including those on for an advance. The whole force under General Johnston's command did not exceed one-third of McClellan's, though the latter has estimated our force on the Potomac in the month of October at not lesing with the transportation of the troops sent by me from Lynchburg in May and June, 1861. McClellan in his report assumes that the evacuation of the line of Bull Run, was in consequence of his pne against the immense force which it was known had been concentrated at and near Washington. McClellan's statement of his own force shows that his troops, including those in Maryland and Delaware,
ons had moved by the roads west of the railroad, and were concentrated near Orange Court-House. I remained near the Rapidan until the 4th of April, when I received orders to move up to Orange CourtHouse to take the cars for Richmond and report to General Lee, who was then entrusted with the general direction of military operations, under the President. I marched to the court-house next day, but found difficulty in getting cars enough to transport my division. Rodes was first sent off, then Kershaw, and my own brigade was finally put on board on the 7th. Going with the rear of this last brigade, I reached Richmond on the morning of the 8th of April, after much delay on the road, and found that Rodes and Kershaw had been sent to General Magruder on the Peninsula, to which point I was also ordered with my own brigade, part going by the way of York River, and the rest by the way of James River in vessels towed by tugs. My trains and artillery moved by land from Orange CourtHouse.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8