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Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
tenacity young lieutenants held on to baggage enough to answer all their purposes at a fashionable watering place in time of peace. After the confidential instructions for the evacuation were given, I tried to persuade all my officers to send all their baggage not capable of being easily transported and for which they did not have immediate necessary use, on the railroad to some place in the rear out of all danger, but the most that I could accomplish was to get them to send it to Manassas Junction. This was generally the case with the whole army, and the consequence was that a vast amount of trunks and other private baggage was accumulated at the Junction at the last moment, for which it was impossible to find any transportation. This evil, however, was finally and completely remedied by the burning which took place when the Junction itself was evacuated, and we never had any great reason subsequently to complain of a plethoric condition of the baggage. Besides this troub
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
en delayed fully as long as it was prudent to do so. Moving back over the routes designated, Ewell's division and mine crossed the Rappahannock on the 10th of March and took position on the south bank. We remained there several days, when my division was moved to the Rapidan and crossed over to the south bank, Ewell being left to guard the crossing of the Rappahannock. G. W. Smith's and Longstreet's divisions had moved by the roads west of the railroad, and were concentrated near Orange Court-House. I remained near the Rapidan until the 4th of April, when I received orders to move up to Orange CourtHouse to take the cars for Richmond and report to General Lee, who was then entrusted with the general direction of military operations, under the President. I marched to the court-house next day, but found difficulty in getting cars enough to transport my division. Rodes was first sent off, then Kershaw, and my own brigade was finally put on board on the 7th. Going with the re
Stone Bridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the division, Captain Green's company of cavalry, for which Thornton's had been exchanged, was relieved from duty with me and attached to General Van Dorn's headquarters. On the 7th of October, the 20tli Georgia Regiment, Colonel W. D. Smith, was attached to my brigade, and joined me in a day or two thereafter. On the 15th of October the whole of our army moved back from the line passing through Fairfax Court-House to me, extending from Union Mills on the right, through Centreville, to Stone Bridge on the left. At the new position Van Dorn's division was on the right, with Ewell's brigade at Union Mills and mine on its left above that point. We proceeded at once to fortify the whole line from right to left. McClellan's report shows that the troops under his command in and about Washington, including those on the Maryland shore of the Potomac above and below Washington and the troops with Dix at Baltimore, on the 15th day of October, the day before our retrograde movement, amo
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
o me, extending from Union Mills on the right, through Centreville, to Stone Bridge on the left. At the new position Van Dorn's division was on the right, with Ewell's brigade at Union Mills and mine on its left above that point. We proceeded at once to fortify the whole line from right to left. McClellan's report shows that the troops under his command in and about Washington, including those on the Maryland shore of the Potomac above and below Washington and the troops with Dix at Baltimore, on the 15th day of October, the day before our retrograde movement, amounted to 133,201 present for duty, and an aggregate present of 143,647. The mass of this force was south of the Potomac, and nearly the whole of it available for an advance. The whole force under General Johnston's command did not exceed one-third of McClellan's, though the latter has estimated our force on the Potomac in the month of October at not less than 150,000. After the occupation of the line at Centrevil
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
assumes that the evacuation of the line of Bull Run, was in consequence of his projected movement to the Peninsula having become known to the Confederate commander, but such was not the fact. Our withdrawal from that line was owing to the fact that our force was too small to enable us to hold so long a line against the immense force which it was known had been concentrated at and near Washington. McClellan's statement of his own force shows that his troops, including those in Maryland and Delaware, numbered on the 1st of January, 1862, 191,840 for duty; on the 1st of February, 190,806 for duty; and on the 1st of March, 193,142 for duty. Of this force he carried into the field in his campaign in the Peninsula considerably over 100,000 men, after having left over 40,000 men to protect Washington. He could have thrown against General Johnston's army, at and near Manassas, a force of more than four times the strength of that army. I have before stated that Johnston's army was compose
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ons had moved by the roads west of the railroad, and were concentrated near Orange Court-House. I remained near the Rapidan until the 4th of April, when I received orders to move up to Orange CourtHouse to take the cars for Richmond and report to General Lee, who was then entrusted with the general direction of military operations, under the President. I marched to the court-house next day, but found difficulty in getting cars enough to transport my division. Rodes was first sent off, then Kershaw, and my own brigade was finally put on board on the 7th. Going with the rear of this last brigade, I reached Richmond on the morning of the 8th of April, after much delay on the road, and found that Rodes and Kershaw had been sent to General Magruder on the Peninsula, to which point I was also ordered with my own brigade, part going by the way of York River, and the rest by the way of James River in vessels towed by tugs. My trains and artillery moved by land from Orange CourtHouse.
White Plains (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
A very large amount of stores and provisions had been abandoned for want of transportation, and among the stores was a quantity of clothing, blankets, etc., which had been provided by the States south of Virginia for their own troops. The pile of trunks along the railroad was appalling to behold. All these stores, clothing, trunks, etc., were consigned to the flames by a portion of our cavalry left to carry out the work of their destruction. The loss of stores at this point, and at White Plains, on the Manassas Gap Railroad, where a large amount of meat had been salted and stored, was a very serious one to us, and embarrassed us for the remainder of the war, as it put us at once on a running stock. The movement back from the line of Bull Run was in itself a very wise one in a strategic point of view, if it was not one of absolute necessity, but the loss of stores was very much to be regretted. I do not pretend to attach censure to any one of our officials for this loss, esp
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
to winter quarters, leaving my brigade on the right of our line, which was now contracted so as to merely cover McLean's Ford on that flank. About the middle of January, 1862, Major General Van Dorn was relieved from duty with the Army of the Potomac and ordered to the Trans-Mississippi Department, General Bonham succeeding to the command of the division as senior brigadier general. On the 30th of January, General Beauregard took leave of the Army of the Potomac, he having been ordered to Kentucky; and after this time there was no distinction of corps in the Army of the Potomac, but all division commanders reported directly to General Johnston. After the 1st of February General Bonham relinquished the command of the division, having resigned his commission to take his seat in Congress, and I succeeded to the command of the division as next in rank --Colonel Kershaw, who was appointed brigadier general, succeeding Bonham in the command of his brigade. My brigade had gone into tem
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
that stream and the landings on the Potomac immediately below Occoquon. Evans had occupied Leesburg. Captain W. W. Thornton's company of cavalry had been again attached to my command and subsequently, in the month of September, a battery of Virginia artillery under Captain Holman reported to me. In the latter part of August, General Longstreet, who had command of the advanced forces at Fairfax Court-House, threw forward a small force of infantry and cavalry and established strong pickets ae rear of our infantry on that route. A very large amount of stores and provisions had been abandoned for want of transportation, and among the stores was a quantity of clothing, blankets, etc., which had been provided by the States south of Virginia for their own troops. The pile of trunks along the railroad was appalling to behold. All these stores, clothing, trunks, etc., were consigned to the flames by a portion of our cavalry left to carry out the work of their destruction. The lo
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 5: operations along Bull Run. Immediately after the battle of the 21st a portion of our troops were moved across Bull Run and the former line north of that stream was re-occupied. The a front of Wolf Run Shoals, below the mouth of Bull Run. Our line was extended from this point by Lah Fairfax Court-House to me, extending from Union Mills on the right, through Centreville, to Stonen was on the right, with Ewell's brigade at Union Mills and mine on its left above that point. We Rodes' brigade was moved to the south of Bull Run to go into winter quarters, leaving my brigadaged in building new winter quarters south of Bull Run, and completing the earthworks covering McLean's Ford when the line of Bull Run was abandoned. About two weeks before the evacuation took plastock. The movement back from the line of Bull Run was in itself a very wise one in a strategic rt assumes that the evacuation of the line of Bull Run, was in consequence of his projected movement[2 more...]
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