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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
as possible General Lee's further advance on Washington, renewed the engagement. He advanced Portern, was withdrawn to the intrenchments around Washington. While Pope was undoubtedly overmatched in should like to know if you feel secure about Washington should this army be destroyed. He had stillas entirely defeated and was falling back to Washington in confusion, and McClellan reports that Mr. Lincoln told him he regarded Washington as lost, and asked him to consent to accept command of all ses. He met Pope and McDowell riding toward Washington, escorted by cavalry, when the former asked l of his enemy. Richmond had been relieved; Washington was threatened. He could not hope with prosunfordable river rolled between Virginia and Washington. His residence at Arlington had made him fad that, after drawing their troops away from Washington, Lee might suddenly cross the Potomac and, widity of march for which he was noted, seize Washington, which attempt would be facilitated by its l[12 more...]
Rebecca Mountain (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s overlooking Harper's Ferry, while Brigadier-General Walker was instructed to cross the Potomac below Harper's Ferry and seize the Loudoun heights in Virginia. These movements were successfully accomplished, and on the 14th Harper's Ferry was closely invested. The heights were crowned with artillery ready to open at command on the doomed garrison. The little village of Harper's Ferry lies in an angle formed by the Shenandoah and Potomac where their united waters break through the Blue Ridge Mountains. It is a troop trap unless defended by the adjacent heights. Colonel Miles had strongly fortified the ridge in Virginia called Bolivar Heights, lying between the rivers; but Maryland heights, the key to the situation, was only feebly garrisoned. At dawn on the 15th, in response to Jackson's order, a line of fire leaped from the mountain-crowned heights and told Colonel Miles, the Federal commander, in no uncertain tones, that his surrender was demanded. For two hours this plunging
Franklin, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
nce, reveled in these enormous stores, consisting of car loads of provisions, boxes of clothing, sutler's stores containing everything from French mustard to cavalry boots. Early that morning Taylor's New Jersey brigade, of Slocum's division of Franklin's corps, which had been transported by rail from Alexandria to Bull Run for the purpose of attacking what was presumed to be a small cavalry raid, got off the cars and marched in line of battle across the open plain to Manassas. Fitz Lee, who entreville heights. He had been reenforced by the corps of Franklin, which arrived on the 30th, and Sumner on the 31st, and the divisions of Cox and Sturgis. These two latter amounted to seventeen thousand men, and the infantry of Sumner's and Franklin's corps to twenty-five thousand. The march of these troops and their junction with Pope had been reported to General Lee by the cavalry, under Fitz Lee, which, having left Manassas the day of Jackson's arrival there, had penetrated the country
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ies were the results of his expedition. The cavalry, skillfully conducted by Colonel B. F. Davis, alone escaped on the Sharpsburg road. When Jackson left Lee, five days before, McClellan was less than five marches from him. It was necessary thatge the details of surrender with his other two divisions, he marched day and night, recrossing the Potomac and reaching Sharpsburg on the 16th, followed by Walker. For the purpose of facilitating this reunion, Lee had retraced his steps from Frederi15th, when the Federal army debouched from the mountains, the cavalry brigade was alone between the Federals and Lee at Sharpsburg to dispute with their advance every foot of ground between the base of the mountains and Boonsboroa. This was done wit, remained there (the 16th) without receiving any orders, and on the morning of the 17th marched for the battlefield at Sharpsburg, arriving at ten o'clock. McClellan did not anticipate Lee would offer battle on that side of the Potomac. When t
Bristoe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
marched Pope was disposing his army along the Rappahannock from Waterloo to Kelly's Ford. On the night of the 26th, when Jackson began to tear up the railroad at Bristoe, the nearest hostile troops were the corps of Heintzelman and Reno at Warrenton Junction, ten miles away. The next day, leaving General Ewell's division at BristBristoe to watch and retard Pope's march to open his communications, Jackson, with the remainder of his troops, proceeded to Manassas. He found that Stuart and Trimble had captured eight guns, three hundred prisoners, and an immense quantity of stores. The vastness and variety of the supplies was a most refreshing sight to his tired aing Jackson and bringing him to a stand, as Pope expressed it, until he could get up Heintzelman and Reno from Centreville, and Porter, with King's division, from Bristoe and Manassas. Pope reached in person the battlefield about noon, and found nearly his whole army in Jackson's front. Longstreet had connected with Jackson's rig
Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s. Colonel Miles had strongly fortified the ridge in Virginia called Bolivar Heights, lying between the rivers; but Maryland heights, the key to the situation, was only feebly garrisoned. At dawn on the 15th, in response to Jackson's order, a line sions, engaged in holding the passes of the mountains, lest the enemy should fall upon McLaws's rear, drive him from Maryland Heights, and thus relieve the garrison at Harper's Ferry. Stuart, who had occupied Turner's Gap with Hampton's brigade of g, as General Lee did, that should have been the object of McClellan's main attack, as it was on the direct route to Maryland Heights and Harper's Ferry. When D. H. Hill, at dawn on the 14th, re-enforced his two advance brigades in Turner's Gap, Stude of Anderson's, to prevent the enemy from passing through the mountains at that point, and threatening his rear at Maryland Heights. The work of these brigades and a portion of Stuart's cavalry was well performed; and when the fighting, which had
Monocacy River (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
er, to clear his headquarters of idle crowds, many went away muttering, Oh, he's no great shakes after all! Lee did not move on Washington after crossing the Potomac, because his numbers were too small to encounter the fortifications and large force assembled for their defense. His line of march was so directed as to draw a portion of the force at Washington after him and then defeat it. Frederick, in Maryland, was his first objective point, and then, it was said, Harrisburg, Pa. The Monocacy River, flowing from north to south, empties into the Potomac about twenty miles below Harper's Ferry. Behind the line of that river he determined to halt and be governed by the movements of his enemy. From that point he could open his communications with the Valley of Virginia by Shepherdstown and Martinsburg; resupply his ammunition; gather in detachments of his men left behind in Virginia, from bare feet and other causes, and fill up his supply trains. He knew his enemy occupied Harper's
Frederick, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
at Washington after him and then defeat it. Frederick, in Maryland, was his first objective point, and then, iand Hyattstown, and well advanced on the road from Frederick to Washington, and every mile of McClellan's marchere all combined. He moved on September 10th from Frederick with three divisions; crossed the Potomac into Virting this reunion, Lee had retraced his steps from Frederick, directing the only two divisions Longstreet had l be only three miles west of Turner's Pass on the Frederick road. Two days after Lee left Frederick, McClellaFrederick, McClellan occupied it, and at eleven o'clock on the night of the 13th informed Halleck that an order of General Lee's, deral Army Corps stacked arms when they arrived at Frederick on the 13th, on the ground that had been previouslen informed by his cavalry of McClellan's reaching Frederick. He did not know that his designs had been disclocavalry brigade in the rear of the Federal army at Frederick, arrived at Boonsboroa during the night, and was d
Bull Run Mountains (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
gust day, Jackson went into bivouac at Salem, a small village on the Manassas Gap Railroad, having marched in the heat and dust twenty-six miles. But one man among twenty thousand knew where they were going. The troops knew an important movement was on hand, which involved contact with the enemy, and possibly a reissue of supplies. At early dawn the next day the march was resumed at right angles to the course of the day before, following the Manassas Gap Railroad and passing through Bull Run Mountains at Thoroughfare Gap. At Gainesville, Stuart, with Robertson and Fitz Lee's brigades of cavalry, overtook Jackson, whose subsequent movements were greatly aided and influenced by the admirable manner in which the cavalry was employed and managed by Stuart. On reaching the vicinity of Manassas Junction, his objective point, Jackson inclined to the right and intersected the main railroad in Pope's rear at Bristoe Station, four miles closer to Pope, where he halted for the night, having
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
supply trains. He knew his enemy occupied Harper's Ferry in large force, and Martinsburg in his reaered from both Generals Lee and McClellan. Harper's Ferry was in his opinion the key to the upper dosufficient troops from his army to capture Harper's Ferry and Martinsburg, and bring them back in tiwas evacuated on his approach; and then to Harper's Ferry, which he reached on the 13th. McLaws, wi was instructed to cross the Potomac below Harper's Ferry and seize the Loudoun heights in Virginia.successfully accomplished, and on the 14th Harper's Ferry was closely invested. The heights were crHeights, and thus relieve the garrison at Harper's Ferry. Stuart, who had occupied Turner's Gap win the direct route to Maryland Heights and Harper's Ferry. When D. H. Hill, at dawn on the 14th, re, and to give Jackson time for his work at Harper's Ferry. The resistance of Hill's troops — from ny. Both were too late to relieve Miles at Harper's Ferry, who surrendered about half-past 7 that mo[4 more...]
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