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k Creek, affording capital shelter for reserves and trains. Five hundred yards west of Little Round Top, and one hundred feet lower, is Devil's Den, a bold, rocky height, steep on its eastern face, but prolonged as a ridge to the west. It lies between two streams in the angle where they meet. The northern extremity is covered with huge bowlders and rocks, forming crevices and holes, the largest of which gives the name to the ridge. Gettysburg is the hub of the wheel, and the Baltimore, York, Harrisburg, Carlisle, Mummasburg, Chambersburg, Millerstown, Emmittsburg, and Taneytown roads the spokes. Lee's troops were distributed over a larger fishhook, surrounding the smaller or inner one; his extreme left was in front of Meade's refused right at Culp's Hill. Johnson's, Early's, and Rodes's divisions, in order named, were located on the curve and through the town to Seminary Ridge from left to right; then came Hill's corps, stretching south, and later, Longstreet's was formed on
Horatio G. Wright (search for this): chapter 13
ning fire, for it would take all the artillery ammunition left to test this one, and leave none for another effort. To this Longstreet responded in another note that the intention is to advance the infantry if the artillery has the desired effect of driving the enemy off, or the effect is such as to warrant us in making the attack; when the moment arrives, advise General Pickett, and of course advance such artillery as you can use in aiding the attack. With Alexander at the time was General Wright, of Georgia, commanding a brigade in Anderson's division of Hill's corps, who practically told him to brace up, that it is not so hard to go there as it looks. I was nearly there with my brigade yesterday. The trouble is to stay. The whole Yankee army is there in a bunch. He was further stiffened by hearing a camp rumor that General Lee had said he was going to send every man he had upon that hill. Afterward it occurred to him that he would ride over and see Pickett and feel his pul
aw in the distance the enemy coming, hour after hour, on to the battle ground. Wilcox's brigade of Anderson's division, Hill's corps, which had been left on picket o arms were stacked, and went into line of battle on Anderson's right at 9 A. M. Wilcox's right rested in a piece of woods, and seven hours afterward, at 4 P. M., McLtyfive hundred men of Pender's division, under Trimble, in a second line, while Wilcox's was to march on the extreme right to protect their flank. Thirteen thousand Kemper from left to right. Garnett's troops were twenty yards only in rear of Wilcox's brigade of Anderson's division, which had been sent out to the front between guns then being put in position by Colonel E. P. Alexander, of the artillery. Wilcox states that the four brigade commanders were together nearly all the time before was over. Pickett's column had gone to the front four hundred yards, when Wilcox, whose brigade had not formed part of the attacking column, was ordered by Long
William White (search for this): chapter 13
that, it would have prevented me from holding any of the ground I subsequently held to the last. Lee to the strong courage of the man united the loving heart of the woman. His nature was too epicene, said an English critic, to be purely a military man. He had a reluctance to oppose the wishes of others, or to order them to do anything that would be disagreeable and to which they would not consent. Had I Stonewall Jackson at Gettysburg, I would have won a great victory, he said to Professor White, of the Washington and Lee University, after the war, because he knew it would have been sufficient for Jackson to have known his general views without transmitting positive orders, and that Stonewall, quick and impatient, would have been driving in the enemy's flank ere the rays of the morning sun lifted the mists from the Round Tops. If Lee had issued by his chief of staff his battle order for the 2d in writing, as is customary, Longstreet would have carried it out probably in good f
Wellington (search for this): chapter 13
old at Hastings. Napoleon waited at Waterloo for the ground to dry and lost hours, during which he might have defeated Wellington before the arrival of re-enforcements. Why should Lee lose the advantages of his more rapid concentration? His superb the allied right, and Reille directed to carry Hougoumont, but the real plan of the great soldier was to break through Wellington's left center, which he ordered to be assaulted with D'Erlon's whole corps supported by Loban's, to drive back the allireported at twenty-five thousand, the Anglo-Belgians at fifteen thousand, Napoleon having seventy-two thousand men, and Wellington sixty-eight thousand, a total of one hundred and forty thousand, while the total of the Army of the Potomac and the Armsoldier in appearance. He generally wore a long gray jacket with three stars on the collar, blue pants tucked into his Wellington boots, and a high felt hat. He never carried arms, He always carried a pistol in the holster on the left of his sad-
e French at Waterloo have been reported at twenty-five thousand, the Anglo-Belgians at fifteen thousand, Napoleon having seventy-two thousand men, and Wellington sixty-eight thousand, a total of one hundred and forty thousand, while the total of the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia was about one hundred and sixty thousand. Both armies mourned the death of brave men and competent officers. In the Army of the Potomac four general officers were killed-Reynolds, Vincent, Weed, and Zook-and thirteen wounded, viz., Hancock, Sickles, Gibbon, Warren, Butterfield, Barlow, Doubleday, Paul, Brook, Barnes, Webb, Stanard, and Graham. In the Army of Northern Virginia five general officers were killed-Pender, Garnett, Armistead, Barksdale, and Semmesand nine wounded, viz., Hood, Hampton, Heth, J. M. Jones, G. T. Anderson, Kemper, Scales, and Jenkins. Meade showed no disposition to assume the offensive after Pickett's repulse. Like Lee at Fredericksburg, he did not want
but resolves to stand in front of his antagonist to the last. What was left of the right of the assaulting troops struck the portion of the Federal lines held by Webb's brigade, Second Corps, and from the stone wall drove two Pennsylvania regiments, capturing the three guns in charge of Lieutenant A. H. Cushing and mortally wournett killed within twenty-five yards of the stone wall, while Armistead and Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, of the Fifty-third Virginia, fell thirty-three yards beyond Webb's line, moving on with a few courageous followers to attack the second line, which had been hurriedly formed. Brave old Armistead's behavior deserves more than a rs were killed-Reynolds, Vincent, Weed, and Zook-and thirteen wounded, viz., Hancock, Sickles, Gibbon, Warren, Butterfield, Barlow, Doubleday, Paul, Brook, Barnes, Webb, Stanard, and Graham. In the Army of Northern Virginia five general officers were killed-Pender, Garnett, Armistead, Barksdale, and Semmesand nine wounded, viz.,
ecord, if late when they began to fight. The attack on Sickles's corps was bravely made and bravely resisted; Sickles's left was turned, and had it not been that Warren sent a brigade of the Fifth Corps and battery on Little Round Top, that most important point might have been seized, and, if held, decided the battle. For its possession there was furious fighting. Sickles first, and then Warren, Meade's chief engineer, called Meade's attention to Little Round Top, and Sykes's column, then in motion, was hurried forward to save it. Sykes, Meade reports, was fortunately able to throw a strong force on Little Round Top, where a most desperate and bloody stnt officers. In the Army of the Potomac four general officers were killed-Reynolds, Vincent, Weed, and Zook-and thirteen wounded, viz., Hancock, Sickles, Gibbon, Warren, Butterfield, Barlow, Doubleday, Paul, Brook, Barnes, Webb, Stanard, and Graham. In the Army of Northern Virginia five general officers were killed-Pender, Garne
R. L. Walker (search for this): chapter 13
aw. Gregg, with a division of Federal cavalry and horse artillery, was in position east of Slocum, and with dismounted cavalry and artillery made Johnson detach Walker's brigade to meet him. When night stopped Johnson he was but a short distance from Meade's headquarters and the Union reserve artillery. A strong night attacre in position from the peach orchard on the right to the woods on the left, where the Third Corps rested, and near by, the other corps had as many more, under R. L. Walker. Salvos by battery were practiced, to secure greater deliberation and power. The Union batteries, under the alert and able chief of artillery, Hunt, were reables as she has. I can not get her to desist, though I have made two special visits to that effect. All the brides have come on a visit to the army-Mrs. Ewell, Mrs. Walker, Mrs. Heth, etc. General Meade's army is north of the Rappahannock, along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. He is very quiet. And again, September 4, 1863:
itance was neither desired by Meade nor Lee, but shoes took command that day, and opened a contest which drew in its bloody embrace one hundred and seventy thousand men. For Reynolds, hearing Buford's guns, hastened to him with the First Corps, Wadsworth's division leading. Hill, who had followed Heth with Pender's division, sent it rapidly to his support, while the Eleventh Corps hastened to the First Corps's assistance. Ewell, with his leading division (Rodes's), at 2.30 P. M. came to Heth'he Federal right, and was told that it was unoccupied at dark, by two staff officers who said they were on its top at that time. At his request he was allowed to remain to secure the hill at daybreak. Hancock, however, reports that he ordered Wadsworth's division with a battery of artillery to take post there in the afternoon. The Federal right was very strong. The woods on Culp's Hill enabled its defenders, with a multitude of axes and spades, to convert it promptly into a fort. When L
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