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Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
s dismounted cavalry were blocking the way; and the great struggle which was to determine, like Waterloo, the fate of a continent, and whether there should be one or two republics on this continent, h similarly situated, assumed the offensive and defeated Harold at Hastings. Napoleon waited at Waterloo for the ground to dry and lost hours, during which he might have defeated Wellington before thehe Spartans at Thermopylae, the English cavalry at Balaklava, or the Old guard of the French at Waterloo. Pickett's division formed at 10.30 A. M. in line nearly parallel and in rear of the rise ue secured the great roads to Baltimore and Washington. It was not unlike Napoleon's tactics at Waterloo; the artillery fire was opened there on the allied right, and Reille directed to carry Hougoumo men were killed and wounded in both armies. The killed, wounded, and missing of the French at Waterloo have been reported at twenty-five thousand, the Anglo-Belgians at fifteen thousand, Napoleon ha
Cemetery Ridge (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
o fight the battle at Gettysburg, and issued orders for the movement of his troops at 7.30 P. M. that evening. In two hours he left Taneytown, and arrived on Cemetery Ridge at 1 A. M. There is testimony that he did not like his position, and his chief of staff says he was directed to prepare an order to withdraw the army from it.edge no support! Why, if every man in that assault had been bullet proof, and if the whole of those fourteen thousand splendid troops had arrived unharmed on Cemetery Ridge, what could have been accomplished? Not being able to kill them, there would have been time for the Federals to have seized, tied, and taken them off in wagocolumn was nearly up the slope and within a few yards of the Second Corps's front and its batteries, when suddenly a terrific fire from every available gun on Cemetery Ridge burst upon them. Their graceful lines underwent an instantaneous transformation in a dense cloud of smoke and dust; arms, heads, blankets, guns, and knapsack
Uniontown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
could cross the Susquehanna. After two days march, he received information that Lee was concentrating and coming toward him, and he at once began to prepare the line of Pipe Creek to await his approach and fight a defensive battle. On the night of June 30th his headquarters and reserve artillery were at Taneytown; the First Corps, at Marsh Creek, six miles from Longstreet and Hill at Cashtown; the Eleventh Corps, at Emmittsburg; Third, at Bridgeport; Twelfth, at Littletown; Second, at Uniontown; Fifth, at Union Mill; Sixth, at Winchester, Md., with Gregg's cavalry, that being his extreme right. Kilpatrick's cavalry division was at Hanover, Pa., while Buford's cavalry guarded his left. Lee was rapidly concentrating. Longstreet and Hill were then near Cashtown, Hill's advance (Heth's division) being seven miles from Gettysburg, and Ewell at Heidelburg, nine miles away. Had Lee known of the defensive position at Gettysburg, he could have easily massed his whole army on July 1
Taneytown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
le. On the night of June 30th his headquarters and reserve artillery were at Taneytown; the First Corps, at Marsh Creek, six miles from Longstreet and Hill at Cashthat excellent officer Reynolds, to Gettysburg; Third, to Emmittsburg; Second, Taneytown; Fifth, Hanover; Twelfth to Two Taverns; while the Sixth was to remain at Mann camp only four miles in the rear. Meade and his Second Corps were at Taneytown, in Maryland, when the sun went down on the 1st, thirteen miles distant; the Fifth C the movement of his troops at 7.30 P. M. that evening. In two hours he left Taneytown, and arrived on Cemetery Ridge at 1 A. M. There is testimony that he did not n rear of the field. The tired troops of the Sixth Corps were massed on the Taneytown road, in the rear of Little Round Top. When that gallant officer, Hood, was ild have produced the with-drawal of the Federal troops by the Baltimore pike, Taneytown, and Emmittsburg roads. See letter to Colonel G. G. Benedict, Burlington, Vt.
Arlington (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
and Lee for some weeks, with reduced forces, simply observed each other. From his camp near Orange Court House, August 23, 1863, General Lee wrote Mrs. Lee that he hears his son is doing well, is walking about, and has everything he wants except his liberty. You may see that a distinguished arrival at Washington is chronicled in the papers of that city-Miss Catherine Burke. She is reported to have given interesting accounts of the Lee family. (This was one of the colored servants from Arlington.) My camp is near Mr. Erasmus Taylor's house, who has been very kind in contributing to our comfort. His wife sends us every day buttermilk, loaf bread, ice, and such vegetables as she has. I can not get her to desist, though I have made two special visits to that effect. All the brides have come on a visit to the army-Mrs. Ewell, Mrs. Walker, Mrs. Heth, etc. General Meade's army is north of the Rappahannock, along the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. He is very quiet. And again, Septem
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
g to move to my rear and interpose between me and Washington, I shall fall back to my supplies at Westminster.ster, but he could not hope to reach Baltimore or Washington, or a point between these cities before Meade. Fave marched, and if Meade had followed him toward Washington he would have been caught between the powerful would have secured the great roads to Baltimore and Washington. It was not unlike Napoleon's tactics at Waterlothat a sufficient number of his force would reach Washington and, with what was already there, make it secure. Halleck, from his office in Washington, urged him to Push forward and fight Lee before he can cross the Potoar never fight. Don't let the enemy escape. The Washington assaults had been so continuous that the Union cog up his troops, militia, etc., and those around Washington and Alexandria. This gave him enormous odds. Itrty. You may see that a distinguished arrival at Washington is chronicled in the papers of that city-Miss Cat
Seminary Ridge (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
of July 1st opened. Closer to the town and about half a mile west of — it is the now famous Seminary Ridge, so called from a Lutheran theological seminary on it, upon which were located the battle liUpon this ridge the Federal line of battle was formed. An undulating valley stretches up to Seminary Ridge, a mile distant, and on the elevated tableland between the two runs the Emmittsburg road. 's, and Rodes's divisions, in order named, were located on the curve and through the town to Seminary Ridge from left to right; then came Hill's corps, stretching south, and later, Longstreet's was fongstreet, who, following Hill's corps, joined him, at 5 P. M., the afternoon of July 1st, on Seminary Ridge, where both made a careful survey with glasses of the hostile heights opposite, and, it is p His right corps chief says he took Pickett, who was to command the charge, to the crest of Seminary Ridge, pointed out the direction to be taken and the point to be assaulted, that he could see the
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
nce (Heth's division) being seven miles from Gettysburg, and Ewell at Heidelburg, nine miles away. sion, Hill's corps, was directed to march to Gettysburg to get shoes for the barefooted men of the dremain at Manchester, thirty-four miles from Gettysburg, and await orders. Heth, after his covet with all other troops then in motion toward Gettysburg. Two brigades of Pender's and one of Early' the afternoon from the high places south of Gettysburg had Ewell and Hill marched again on the brokld not consent. Had I Stonewall Jackson at Gettysburg, I would have won a great victory, he said tss that the rear corps-Ewell's-did not leave Gettysburg until late in the forenoon of the 5th. WithMeade was very deliberate and circumspect at Gettysburg, for he did not forget the bullet holes throfirst question were in favor of remaining at Gettysburg, but all voted against assuming the offensivbefore this reaches you that our success at Gettysburg was not so great as reported. In fact, that[25 more...]
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ation for incompetent officers, resulting from an excess of good-nature. The intelligent and impartial critic must admit the offensive dispositions of Lee skillful; the Union left on the 2d to a late hour was most vulnerable, and upon it the attack was designed; while the assault on the 3d, if not surrounded with as many chances of success as on the former day, was made at a point where, if successful, he would have secured the great roads to Baltimore and Washington. It was not unlike Napoleon's tactics at Waterloo; the artillery fire was opened there on the allied right, and Reille directed to carry Hougoumont, but the real plan of the great soldier was to break through Wellington's left center, which he ordered to be assaulted with D'Erlon's whole corps supported by Loban's, to drive back the allies on their own right, and secure the great road to Brussels before the helmets of the Prussian squadrons could be seen on the heights of St. Lambert. Lee, too, was infused with the c
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Awakened from sleep by General Hardee, the War Department messenger, he had not much time to get any knowledge of them from Hooker, while a battle in the next few days could not be avoided. He determined to continue the move northward through Maryland into Pennsylvania, and force Lee to give battle before he could cross the Susquehanna. After two days march, he received information that Lee was concentrating and coming toward him, and he at once began to prepare the line of Pipe Creek to st be, from their well-known high charactershe disobeyed orders when he attacked with one third and not with his whole corps. Lee knew all the facts, for, in addition to what was said to Ewell, Early, and Pendleton, he told Governor Carroll, of Maryland, that the battle would have been gained if General Longstreet had obeyed the order given him and attacked early instead of late; that Longstreet was a brilliant soldier when once engaged, but the hardest man to move in my army. At 1 A. M. on
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