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Two Taverns (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
whole division there the next day, July 1st, and get the shoes, to which Hill replied, None in the world. Buford, with his cavalry division, reached Gettysburg on the day Pettigrew made his visit, and threw out his pickets toward Cashtown and Hunterstown. In an order of march for July 1st, Meade, not knowing Lee was so near, directed the First and Eleventh Corps, under that excellent officer Reynolds, to Gettysburg; Third, to Emmittsburg; Second, Taneytown; Fifth, Hanover; Twelfth to Two Taverns; while the Sixth was to remain at Manchester, thirty-four miles from Gettysburg, and await orders. Heth, after his coveted shoes, reached McPherson's Heights, one mile west of Gettysburg, at 9 A. M. on July 1st, deployed two brigades on either side of the road, and advanced on the town. Promptly the few sputtering shots which first announced the skirmish line's opening told him that Buford's dismounted cavalry were blocking the way; and the great struggle which was to determine, li
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
aff. Meade's father served as a private soldier in the Pennsylvania troops to suppress the Whisky Insurrection in western Pennsylvania, and therefore was under General Lee's father, who commanded the forces raised for that purpose. He was afterward battle in the next few days could not be avoided. He determined to continue the move northward through Maryland into Pennsylvania, and force Lee to give battle before he could cross the Susquehanna. After two days march, he received informationtroops struck the portion of the Federal lines held by Webb's brigade, Second Corps, and from the stone wall drove two Pennsylvania regiments, capturing the three guns in charge of Lieutenant A. H. Cushing and mortally wounding this brave young offie high-water mark of Southern independence had been reached, and from that hour it began to ebb from the mountains of Pennsylvania until lost in the hills of Appomattox. It is all my fault, Lee exclaimed, and proceeded in person to rally and reform
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
bability Little Round Top too, for a plunging fire from big Round Top would have cleared its crest and sides of Federal troops. The Fifteenth Alabama, under the brave Colonel Oates, was on the extreme right of Hood's line, and advanced up the southern slope of the Round Top in the face of an incessant fire from behind rocks and crags that covered the mountain side thicker than gravestones in a city cemetery. Oates pushed forward until he reached the top of Round Top; the Forty-seventh, Alabama, on his left, also reached the top, where both regiments rested a short time, and were then ordered forward, and went down the north side of the mountain. Oates saw at a glance the great value of the position, but was obliged to obey orders and move on. With the whole division there, some higher officer with authority to act would have quickly placed artillery on its summit, and the next day from that point Lee would have been master of the situation. The Alabamians, after reaching
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
alf to show yourself a great general; order the army to advance while I take the cavalry, get in Lee's rear, and we will finish the campaign in a week. While this advice, if followed, might have been of great benefit to Lee, its most remarkable feature was its presumption. Thirty-six hours after Lee abandoned the field of Gettysburg, Meade, recalling Sedgwick, who had gone toward Fairfield, marched from Gettysburg south to Frederick, Md., thence slowly around by Middletown and the old Sharpsburg battlefield to Lee's position. While he was moving around the horseshoe, General Lee, with a good start, had gone across from heel to heel, and, had it not been for high water, would have been in Virginia before the last of the Army of the Potomac left the battlefield of Gettysburg. Meade telegraphed Halleck on the 6th that if he could get the Army of the Potomac in hand he would attack Lee if he had not crossed the river, but hoped if misfortune overtook him that a sufficient number
Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
llery were at Taneytown; the First Corps, at Marsh Creek, six miles from Longstreet and Hill at Cashtown; the Eleventh Corps, at Emmittsburg; Third, at Bridgeport; Twelfth, at Littletown; Second, at Uavalry guarded his left. Lee was rapidly concentrating. Longstreet and Hill were then near Cashtown, Hill's advance (Heth's division) being seven miles from Gettysburg, and Ewell at Heidelburg, nision, reached Gettysburg on the day Pettigrew made his visit, and threw out his pickets toward Cashtown and Hunterstown. In an order of march for July 1st, Meade, not knowing Lee was so near, directcribed as full of long ridges running north and south, as the mountains do. On Lee's route from Cashtown to Gettysburg one of these ridges is crossed at right angles one and a half mile west of Gettyut in motion by the Fairfield road which crossed the South Mountain range seven miles south of Cashtown, being the direct road to Williamsport; but the rain and mud so impeded progress that the rear
Lexington, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
d carriage, and muscular strength. When a colt he took the first premium at the Greenbrier Fair, under the name of Jeff Davis. General Grant also had a horse called Jeff Davis. The general changed his name to Traveler. He often rode him in Lexington after the war, and at his funeral Traveler followed the hearse. He was appraised by a board in August, 1864, at $4,600 in Confederate currency. Though Lee was ready to cover his face with his mantle and die like the Athenian, it would have high felt hat. He never carried arms, He always carried a pistol in the holster on the left of his sad-dle, because more convenient to reach when dismounted, and ammu-nition in the right holster. This pistol always hung over his bedpost in Lexington after the war and was discharged after his death — not a barrel missing fire. was always neat in dress and person, and on the most arduous marches looked smart and clean, and, what is very pleasing to an Englishman, he rides a handsome horse, w
Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ves and trains. Five hundred yards west of Little Round Top, and one hundred feet lower, is Devil's Den, a bold, rocky height, steep on its eastern face, but prolonged as a ridge to the west. It lies between two streams in the angle where they meet. The northern extremity is covered with huge bowlders and rocks, forming crevices and holes, the largest of which gives the name to the ridge. Gettysburg is the hub of the wheel, and the Baltimore, York, Harrisburg, Carlisle, Mummasburg, Chambersburg, Millerstown, Emmittsburg, and Taneytown roads the spokes. Lee's troops were distributed over a larger fishhook, surrounding the smaller or inner one; his extreme left was in front of Meade's refused right at Culp's Hill. Johnson's, Early's, and Rodes's divisions, in order named, were located on the curve and through the town to Seminary Ridge from left to right; then came Hill's corps, stretching south, and later, Longstreet's was formed on its right. The army smallest in numbers
Millerstown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
. Five hundred yards west of Little Round Top, and one hundred feet lower, is Devil's Den, a bold, rocky height, steep on its eastern face, but prolonged as a ridge to the west. It lies between two streams in the angle where they meet. The northern extremity is covered with huge bowlders and rocks, forming crevices and holes, the largest of which gives the name to the ridge. Gettysburg is the hub of the wheel, and the Baltimore, York, Harrisburg, Carlisle, Mummasburg, Chambersburg, Millerstown, Emmittsburg, and Taneytown roads the spokes. Lee's troops were distributed over a larger fishhook, surrounding the smaller or inner one; his extreme left was in front of Meade's refused right at Culp's Hill. Johnson's, Early's, and Rodes's divisions, in order named, were located on the curve and through the town to Seminary Ridge from left to right; then came Hill's corps, stretching south, and later, Longstreet's was formed on its right. The army smallest in numbers had the longe
Balaklava (Ukraine) (search for this): chapter 13
, under that fine officer Pettigrew, Heth having been wounded the day before)-were placed on Pickett's left, and two, Lane's and Scales's, about twentyfive hundred men of Pender's division, under Trimble, in a second line, while Wilcox's was to march on the extreme right to protect their flank. Thirteen thousand five hundred, or at most fourteen thousand troops, had been massed to attack an army, but with no more hope of success than had the Spartans at Thermopylae, the English cavalry at Balaklava, or the Old guard of the French at Waterloo. Pickett's division formed at 10.30 A. M. in line nearly parallel and in rear of the rise upon which runs the Emmittsburg road, but rather diagonally to the Union position at the contemplated point of attack. Kemper's right was one thousand eight hundred and sixty yards distant from it, while Pettigrew prolonged the line somewhat en echelon. Pickett's first formation was in one line, Armistead, Garnett, and Kemper from left to right. Garnet
Westminster (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
xth, on the field in time, and was solicitous about his depot of supplies at Westminster. As late as 3 P. M. on the 2d, and before he was attacked, he telegrapheand interpose between me and Washington, I shall fall back to my supplies at Westminster. Lee, impressed with the idea of whipping his opponent in detail, on the have moved toward Frederick on the 2d, and thus forced Meade to fall back to Westminster, but he could not hope to reach Baltimore or Washington, or a point between these cities before Meade. From Westminster cars could have conveyed the Union troops more rapidly than his could have marched, and if Meade had followed him towardangered his lines of communication. The closer the two armies approached Westminster the larger the numbers of the Unionists would grow. Lee could not move aroulry from that flank had been sent away early in the day to guard supplies at Westminster. Over the splendid scene of human courage and human sacrifice at Gettysburg
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