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Middletown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
give you an hour and a half to show yourself a great general; order the army to advance while I take the cavalry, get in Lee's rear, and we will finish the campaign in a week. While this advice, if followed, might have been of great benefit to Lee, its most remarkable feature was its presumption. Thirty-six hours after Lee abandoned the field of Gettysburg, Meade, recalling Sedgwick, who had gone toward Fairfield, marched from Gettysburg south to Frederick, Md., thence slowly around by Middletown and the old Sharpsburg battlefield to Lee's position. While he was moving around the horseshoe, General Lee, with a good start, had gone across from heel to heel, and, had it not been for high water, would have been in Virginia before the last of the Army of the Potomac left the battlefield of Gettysburg. Meade telegraphed Halleck on the 6th that if he could get the Army of the Potomac in hand he would attack Lee if he had not crossed the river, but hoped if misfortune overtook him t
Carlisle, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
anxious to attack before it could. He had already talked with Longstreet, who, following Hill's corps, joined him, at 5 P. M., the afternoon of July 1st, on Seminary Ridge, where both made a careful survey with glasses of the hostile heights opposite, and, it is presumed, attempted to impress him with the importance of an early attack next day, and later that night saw him again. On the same evening he rode into the town of Gettysburg, and met, in an arbor attached to a small house on the Carlisle road north of the town, Ewell, Early, and Rodes. The Confederate commander was anxious at first that Ewell and Hill should commence the battle, and seemed apprehensive that Longstreet might not get into position as soon as the conditions demanded, but finally yielded to the opinion expressed, that Longstreet should commence the battle by a forward movement on Hill's right, seize the commanding positions on the enemy's left, and envelop and enfilade the flank of the troops in front of th
Cemetery Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
wn, pursued by the Confederates. There had been an attempt to reform some of the Eleventh Corps as they passed over Cemetery Hill, but it had not been very successful. I presume there may have been one thousand or twelve hundred organized troops distant, and on the elevated tableland between the two runs the Emmittsburg road. Gettysburg lies at the base of Cemetery Hill, where the ridge bends in a curve, east, and then southeast, to an elevation called Culp's Hill. On Culp's Hill and e directed Ewell to assault with his whole corps. Johnson on the slopes of Culp's Hill to start first, then Early up Cemetery Hill, and Rodes to advance on Early's right. Johnson had in front a rugged and rocky mountain difficult of ascent-a napace of a mile. It was a grand spectacle, never before witnessed on this continent. Hunt reported he could see from Cemetery Hill the Southern guns stretched, apparently in one unbroken mass, from opposite the town to the peach orchard, the ridges
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 12: Gettysburg. The fifth commander of the Army of the Potomac was Major-General George Gordon Meade, then in command of the Fifth Corps. This officer was born in Cadiz, Spain, in December, 1815, and was consequently forty-six years old. He graduated at West Point in 1835, and was assigned to the artillery arm of the service. A year afterward he resigned from the army, but after six years was reappointed second lieutenant of the Topographical Engineers, and was in Mexico on General Patterson's staff. Meade's father served as a private soldier in the Pennsylvania troops to suppress the Whisky Insurrection in western Pennsylvania, and therefore was under General Lee's father, who commanded the forces raised for that purpose. He was afterward a merchant, a shipowner, and a navy agent in Cadiz, but shortly after his son's birth returned to the United States. In justice to this officer, it may be said that he protested against being placed in command of an army that ha
Culp's Hill (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
curve, east, and then southeast, to an elevation called Culp's Hill. On Culp's Hill and around this curve, and then south tCulp's Hill and around this curve, and then south to Round Top for three miles, was the Union battle line. Its shape has been not inaptly compared to a fish hook, with long siis extreme left was in front of Meade's refused right at Culp's Hill. Johnson's, Early's, and Rodes's divisions, in order narnoon. The Federal right was very strong. The woods on Culp's Hill enabled its defenders, with a multitude of axes and spad assault with his whole corps. Johnson on the slopes of Culp's Hill to start first, then Early up Cemetery Hill, and Rodes tt, and could not have sent troops to help Howard to hold Culp's Hill. Rodes reports: He had commenced to make the necessaick respectively. The Union flanks, five miles apart on Culp's Hill and the Round Tops, were almost impregnable and difficuleade told General Ewell, after the war, had he occu-pied Culp's Hill at 4 P. M., July 1st, it would have produced the with-dr
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
atively safe. If the Army of the Potomac did not want a battle, it could fall back on the defenses of Washington. If the Army of Northern Virginia declined the encounter, it could withdraw to the Richmond line. At this period it was determined to re-enforce General Bragg in the West with two divisions of Longstreet's corps, to enable him to defeat the Federal General Rosecrans, which he did at Chickamauga, while the third division-Pickett's — should be detached for duty south of the James River. Meade then crossed over the Rappahannock and occupied Culpeper and the country between the two rivers, so as to be closer to Lee should he decide to resume offensive operations, but his plans were set aside by troops being detached from him also. The Eleventh and Twelfth Corps under Hooker were sent West, and a considerable number to South Carolina and New York --to this latter place to prevent riots resulting from an enforcement of the recruiting draft. Meade and Lee for some wee
Williamsport (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ed as could bear transportation, back to the Potomac at Williamsport under a cavalry escort, and was busy in burying his deaeven miles south of Cashtown, being the direct road to Williamsport; but the rain and mud so impeded progress that the rearwn, Md., on the 6th, the same day his trains arrived at Williamsport, a few miles distant. On account of the swollen condite of defense skillfully traced to cover the river from Williamsport to Falling Waters, and confidently awaited the subsidend his flanks in the retreat and had saved his trains at Williamsport from an attack of the Union cavalry before his army reanted to know if they deemed it expedient to move toward Williamsport through Emmittsburg, or if his enemy was retreating, shroyed, the rebellion would be over. While waiting at Williamsport General Lee received the news of the capture (by raidinth the Army of Northern Virginia recrossed the river at Williamsport, and on the pontoon bridge at Falling Water, which had
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ee responsible for one of them seized him. Gradually the conclusion was reached that perhaps he was occupying a position which might be filled by one who could render greater service with the means at command. On August 8th, from his camp in Orange, General Lee wrote the Southern President that the general remedy for the want of success in a military commander is his removal, and that his reflections had prompted him to propose to your Excellency the propriety of selecting another commanderderable number to South Carolina and New York --to this latter place to prevent riots resulting from an enforcement of the recruiting draft. Meade and Lee for some weeks, with reduced forces, simply observed each other. From his camp near Orange Court House, August 23, 1863, General Lee wrote Mrs. Lee that he hears his son is doing well, is walking about, and has everything he wants except his liberty. You may see that a distinguished arrival at Washington is chronicled in the papers of that
Chickamauga (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
The relative location of the hostile forces made partial reduction of their numbers comparatively safe. If the Army of the Potomac did not want a battle, it could fall back on the defenses of Washington. If the Army of Northern Virginia declined the encounter, it could withdraw to the Richmond line. At this period it was determined to re-enforce General Bragg in the West with two divisions of Longstreet's corps, to enable him to defeat the Federal General Rosecrans, which he did at Chickamauga, while the third division-Pickett's — should be detached for duty south of the James River. Meade then crossed over the Rappahannock and occupied Culpeper and the country between the two rivers, so as to be closer to Lee should he decide to resume offensive operations, but his plans were set aside by troops being detached from him also. The Eleventh and Twelfth Corps under Hooker were sent West, and a considerable number to South Carolina and New York --to this latter place to preve
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
e 5th. With the exception of the loss of some wagons and ambulances by cavalry attacks, there was no interruption to the retrograde movement. Lee reached Hagerstown, Md., on the 6th, the same day his trains arrived at Williamsport, a few miles distant. On account of the swollen condition of the Potomac from recent rains, and flanks in the retreat and had saved his trains at Williamsport from an attack of the Union cavalry before his army reached there, and had a creditable affair at Hagerstown. Six days after his arrival, Meade, marching from Gettysburg by a different route from that pursued by Lee, began to deploy his legions in his front. Lee'sr labors and hardships manfully. Our noble men are cheerful and confident. I constantly remember you in my thoughts and prayers. On July 12th, in camp near Hagerstown, Lee heard his son had been carried to Fort Monroe, and wrote: The consequences of war are horrid enough at best surrounded by all the amelioration of civilizat
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