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Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
f his own, he turned with the tenderest affection to the daughters of his brother Robert.-His public service of more than thirty years in the navy of the United States is well known. He entered it as a boy of fifteen, and faithfully served his country by land and sea in many climes and on many oceans. He was in Japan with Commodore Perry, commanding his flagship, when that inaccessible country was practically opened to the commerce of the world. He was Commandant of the Naval Academy at Annapolis, and afterward in command of the navy yard at Philadelphia. When the war of secession began he was stationed in Washington, but when Virginia seceded he did not hesitate to abandon the comforts and security of the present and ambitions of the future and cast his lot with his native State in a war which, from the very nature of things, there could be but little hope for a naval officer. Uninfluenced then by hope of either fame or fortune, he sadly parted with the friends and comrades of
Dungeness (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
under the generous roof and kindly influence of the hospitable daughter of a beloved brother soldier. He was landed at Dungeness, known as the most beautiful and attractive residence on the Georgia coast, and here he was lovingly received and tendethe injuries received in Baltimore, were intense. Mrs. Shaw, General Greene's daughter, said that after his arrival at Dungeness they still continued, and that a surgical operation was proposed as offering some hope of prolonging his life; but he ran old negro nurse, even as he did courage in the breasts of his soldiers. Not the least among the recollections of Dungeness is the fact that the last days of one of the great heroes of the Revolution were passed there; and when the flowers of arranged. The remains of Light-horse Harry, therefore, still rest amid the magnolias, cedars, and myrtles of beautiful Dungeness. In many respects this officer was one of the most remarkable men of his day. He was a patriot and soldier, whose pe
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
bly full; neither was it such a far cry from Shropshire to the near vicinity of London, a remove preparatory, possibly, to the still greater one across the Atlantic. mmendation. Introductis ad Latinum Blasoniam. By John Gibbons, Blue Man-tel, London, 1682. It is also said that he offered the exiled monarch an asylum in the Newes, indicating in themselves his enterprising genius. When he made his will in London, in 1663, he was returning on what proved to be his last voyage. He had with ughter. His eldest son, Richard, the third of the name, married and settled in London, though his children eventually returned to Virginia. Philip removed to Marylaut to embark for England to study it, under the direction of Bishop Porteus, of London, when stopped by hostilities between the mother country and her American colonirote a life of him in French, which has been well received by the people of that country, and was translated into English, in 1875, by Mr. George Litting, of London.
Oxfordshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
ted to Virginia in the reign of Charles I. He believed, however, from his inherited traditions and the Coat of Arms borne by his progenitors in this country, that his family came originally from Shropshire, England; and when the world rang with his name and fame, and he paid the usual penalty of greatness by being besieged with reiterated queries respecting his pedigree, this was all he would say. Others, however, took more interest in the subject; he was claimed by the Lees of Cheshire, Oxfordshire, Bucks, and Essex, as well as of Shropshire, and much was said and written pro and con both before and after his death. In recent years his genealogy has been very persistently and thoroughly investigated by those learned in antiquarian research, and their conclusion is in favor of Shropshire, though in 1663 the first emigrant, Colonel Richard Lee, made a will in which he states that he was lately of Stafford Langton in the county of Essex. Now, as we have every reason to believe tha
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
apidly in his new career. In the Northern Department at Brandywine, Germantown, Springfield, and in the operations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York, his address, cool courage, great ability, and unceasing activity as an outpost officer speeto 1795 he was Governor of Virginia, and was selected by President Washington to command the fifteen thousand men from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland, who were sent into western Pennsylvania to quell what was known as the Whisky Insurrection,western Pennsylvania to quell what was known as the Whisky Insurrection, which he successfully accomplished without bloodshed. This rebellion grew out of a resistance to a tax laid on distilled spirits. Washington accompanied him on the march as far as Bedford, Pa., and in a letter, dated October 20, 1794, to Henry Lee, Esq., commander in chief of the militia army on its march against the insurgents in certain counties of western Pennsylvania, says at its conclusion: In leaving the Army I have less regret, as I know I commit it to an able and faithful direction,
Big Lick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
he might also have been the author of the Declaration of American Independence in place of Thomas Jefferson. His services to the cause of the colony were great, and their struggle for independence was sustained by his tongue and pen. He was a great orator, an accomplished scholar, a learned debater, and a renowned statesman in that period of our country's history. His father's brother, Henry Lee, the fifth son of the second Richard, married a Miss Bland, a great-aunt of John Randolph, of Roanoke. His only daughter married a Fitzhugh. His son Henry married Miss Grymes, and left a family of six sons and four daughters. Henry, the eldest, was the well-known Light-horse Harry of the Revolutionary War, the father of Robert E. Lee. He and Richard Henry Lee are frequently confounded, and their relationship has often been the subject of inquiry. Richard Henry Lee's father, Thomas, and Henry Lee's grandfather, Henry, were brothers. The former was therefore a first cousin of the latter
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
passage in a New England schooner bound from Nassau to New Providence and Boston. On nearing the coast of the United States he became so much worse that he requested the captain to direct his course to Cumberland Island, lying off the coast of Georgia. He knew that his former trusted friend, General Nathanael Greene, had an estate there, and that there resided his married daughter, Mrs. James Shaw. Next to dying within the limits of his native State he preferred to furl the flag of a celebrbeautiful and attractive residence on the Georgia coast, and here he was lovingly received and tenderly cared for. From the window of his sick-room an extensive view of the Atlantic Ocean, of Cumberland Sound, and the low-lying verdant shores of Georgia could be seen upon the one side, while upon the other lay attractive gardens and groves of oranges and olives, while grand live oaks swayed solemnly to and fro loaded with pendent moss. General Henry Lee's sufferings, consequent upon the inju
Westmoreland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
built in the shape of the letter H, and not far from the banks of the Potomac. Upon the roof were summer houses, with chimneys for columns, where the band played in the evenings, and the ladies and gentlemen promenaded. Thomas Lee was buried at Pope's Creek Church, five miles from Stratford. George Washington was baptized at this church, and in the early days his family, the Lees, Paynes, and other prominent families of the neighborhood worshiped there. It has been said that as Westmoreland County is distinguished above all other counties in Virginia as the birthplace of genius, so, perhaps, no other Virginian could boast so many distinguished sons as President Thomas Lee. General Washington, in 1771, wrote: I know of no country that can produce a family all distinguished as clever men, as our Lees. These sons in order of age were: Philip Ludwell, Richard Henry, Thomas, Francis Lightfoot, Henry, and Arthur. Matilda, the first wife of General Henry Lee, the father of General R
Essex (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
; he was claimed by the Lees of Cheshire, Oxfordshire, Bucks, and Essex, as well as of Shropshire, and much was said and written pro and con both before and after his death. In recent years his genealogy has been very persistently and thoroughly investigated by those learned in antiquarian research, and their conclusion is in favor of Shropshire, though in 1663 the first emigrant, Colonel Richard Lee, made a will in which he states that he was lately of Stafford Langton in the county of Essex. Now, as we have every reason to believe that he was a younger son, the parental nest was probably full; neither was it such a far cry from Shropshire to the near vicinity of London, a remove preparatory, possibly, to the still greater one across the Atlantic. He certainly used the arms of the Shropshire Lees. Colonel Lee's devotion to the House of Stuart was notorious, and had been often proved even by the manner of dating his will — viz., The 6th of February, in the sixteenth year of
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
who dwell to-day in the powerful republic of America. Here, from England, in 1665, settled the grd he was chosen the first President of the United States. This little county was not satisfied wit8, to consider the Federal Constitution, a United States Senator, envoy to France, England, and Spay. James Madison, fourth President of the United States, was born in the adjoining county of King n Marshall, afterward Chief Justice of the United States, and Edmund Randolph; while in the ranks o question of serving under the flag of the United States or of obeying the will of Virginia, he dree and Boston. On nearing the coast of the United States he became so much worse that he requested the war in the Southern Department of the United States. Two editions of it had been exhausted, an more than thirty years in the navy of the United States is well known. He entered it as a boy of husband in the hope that the armies of the United States would gain victories over the troops of th[1 more...]
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