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Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
ad been great delay in obtaining the authority of Congress for the raising of the troops asked for by the administration. A bill was before the National Legislature from early in the session of 1846-7, authorizing the creation of ten additional regiments for the war to be attached to the regular army, but it was the middle of February before it became a law. Appointments of commissioned officers had then to be made; men had to be enlisted, the regiments equipped and the whole transported to Mexico. It was August before General Scott received reinforcement sufficient to warrant an advance. His moving column, not even now more than ten thousand strong, was in four divisions, commanded by Generals Twiggs, Worth, Pillow and Quitman. There was also a cavalry corps under General [William S.] Harney, composed of detachments of the 1st, 2d, and 3d dragoons. The advance commenced on the 7th of August with Twiggs's division in front. The remaining three divisions followed, with an interval
Perote, Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
March to Jalapa-battle of Cerro Gordo-Perote-Puebla-Scott and Taylor General Scott had less than twelve thousand men at Vera Cruz. He had been promised by the administration a very much larger force, or claimed that he had, and he was a man ofre were at that time but two roads from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico that could be taken by an army; one by Jalapa and Perote, the other by Cordova and Orizaba, the two coming together on the great plain which extends to the City of Mexico after tze and fortify in our front. Worth's division was selected to go forward to secure this result. The division marched to Perote on the great plain, not far from where the road debouches from the mountains. There is a low, strong fort on the plain is reduced Scott's force in the field to about five thousand men. Early in May [May 8], Worth, with his division, left Perote and marched on to Puebla. The roads were wide and the country open except through one pass in a spur of mountains coming
Monterrey (Nuevo Leon, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
risoners were paroled, the artillery parked and the small arms and ammunition destroyed. The battle of Buena Vista was probably very important to the success of General Scott at Cerro Gordo and in his entire campaign from Vera Cruz to the great plains, reaching to the City of Mexico. The only Army Santa Anna had to protect his capital and the mountain passes west of Vera Cruz, was the one he had with him confronting General Taylor. It is not likely that he would have gone as far north as Monterey to attack the United States troops when he knew his country was threatened with invasion further south. When Taylor moved to Saltillo and then advanced on to Buena Vista, Santa Anna crossed the desert confronting the invading army, hoping no doubt to crush it and get back in time to meet General Scott in the mountain passes west of Vera Cruz. His attack on Taylor was disastrous to the Mexican army, but, notwithstanding this, he marched his army to Cerro Gordo, a distance not much short of
Saltillo (Coahuila, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
mportant to the success of General Scott at Cerro Gordo and in his entire campaign from Vera Cruz to the great plains, reaching to the City of Mexico. The only Army Santa Anna had to protect his capital and the mountain passes west of Vera Cruz, was the one he had with him confronting General Taylor. It is not likely that he would have gone as far north as Monterey to attack the United States troops when he knew his country was threatened with invasion further south. When Taylor moved to Saltillo and then advanced on to Buena Vista, Santa Anna crossed the desert confronting the invading army, hoping no doubt to crush it and get back in time to meet General Scott in the mountain passes west of Vera Cruz. His attack on Taylor was disastrous to the Mexican army, but, notwithstanding this, he marched his army to Cerro Gordo, a distance not much short of one thousand miles by the line he had to travel, in time to intrench himself well before Scott got there. If he had been successful a
Puebla (Puebla, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
March to Jalapa-battle of Cerro Gordo-Perote-Puebla-Scott and Taylor General Scott had less than twelve thousand men at Vera Cruz. He had been promised by the administration a very much larger f thousand men. Early in May [May 8], Worth, with his division, left Perote and marched on to Puebla. The roads were wide and the country open except through one pass in a spur of mountains comingh of special note, except that while lying at the town of Amozoque — an easy day's march east of Puebla — a body of the enemy's cavalry, two or three thousand strong, was seen to our right, not more tnts, was sent against them and they soon disappeared. On the 15th of May we entered the city of Puebla. General Worth was in command at Puebla until the latter end of May, when General Scott arriPuebla until the latter end of May, when General Scott arrived. Here, as well as on the march up, his restlessness, particularly under responsibilities, showed itself. During his brief command he had the enemy hovering around near the city, in vastly superi
Jalapa (Tabasco, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
March to Jalapa-battle of Cerro Gordo-Perote-Puebla-Scott and Taylor General Scott had less than twelve thousand men at the City of Mexico that could be taken by an army; one by Jalapa and Perote, the other by Cordova and Orizaba, the two comi absolutely necessary to have enough to supply the army to Jalapa, sixty-five miles in the interior and above the fevers of enced. On the 8th of April, Twiggs's division started for Jalapa. He was followed very soon by Patterson, with his divisionemy at Cerro Gordo, some fifty miles west, on the road to Jalapa, and went into camp at Plan del Rio [Rio del Plan], about urs of the mountains some twelve to fifteen miles east of Jalapa, and Santa Anna had selected this point as the easiest to feat. After the battle the victorious army moved on to Jalapa, where it was in a beautiful, productive and healthy country, far above the fevers of the coast. Jalapa, however, is still in the mountains, and between there and the great plain th
Orizaba (Veracruz, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
of veracity. Twelve thousand was a very small army with which to penetrate two hundred and sixty miles into an enemy's country, and to besiege the capital; a city, at that time, of largely over one hundred thousand inhabitants. Then, too, any line of march that could be selected led through mountain passes easily defended. In fact, there were at that time but two roads from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico that could be taken by an army; one by Jalapa and Perote, the other by Cordova and Orizaba, the two coming together on the great plain which extends to the City of Mexico after the range of mountains is passed. It was very important to get the army away from Vera Cruz as soon as possible, in order to avoid the yellow fever, or vomito, which usually visits that city early in the year, and is very fatal to persons not acclimated; but transportation, which was expected from the North, was arriving very slowly. It was absolutely necessary to have enough to supply the army to Jal
Vera Cruz (Veracruz, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
l Scott had less than twelve thousand men at Vera Cruz. He had been promised by the administration, there were at that time but two roads from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico that could be taken bywas very important to get the army away from Vera Cruz as soon as possible, in order to avoid the y the 13th of April before this division left Vera Cruz. The leading division ran against the en18th of April. General Scott had remained at Vera Cruz to hasten preparations for the field; but on Cerro Gordo and in his entire campaign from Vera Cruz to the great plains, reaching to the City of his capital and the mountain passes west of Vera Cruz, was the one he had with him confronting GenGeneral Scott in the mountain passes west of Vera Cruz. His attack on Taylor was disastrous to theng now only nine or ten thousand men west of Vera Cruz, and the time of some four thousand of them indefinite period even if their line back to Vera Cruz should be cut off. It being ascertained that[1 more...]
Cerro Gordo, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
April before this division left Vera Cruz. The leading division ran against the enemy at Cerro Gordo, some fifty miles west, on the road to Jalapa, and went into camp at Plan del Rio [Rio del Plarations for the capture of the position held by Santa Anna and of the troops holding it. Cerro Gordo is one of the higher spurs of the mountains some twelve to fifteen miles east of Jalapa, anded. The battle of Buena Vista was probably very important to the success of General Scott at Cerro Gordo and in his entire campaign from Vera Cruz to the great plains, reaching to the City of Mexico Taylor was disastrous to the Mexican army, but, notwithstanding this, he marched his army to Cerro Gordo, a distance not much short of one thousand miles by the line he had to travel, in time to intn successful at Buena Vista his troops would no doubt have made a more stubborn resistance at Cerro Gordo. Had the battle of Buena Vista not been fought Santa Anna would have had time to move leisur
Buena Vista (Baja Caifornia Norte, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 10
g General Taylor. It is not likely that he would have gone as far north as Monterey to attack the United States troops when he knew his country was threatened with invasion further south. When Taylor moved to Saltillo and then advanced on to Buena Vista, Santa Anna crossed the desert confronting the invading army, hoping no doubt to crush it and get back in time to meet General Scott in the mountain passes west of Vera Cruz. His attack on Taylor was disastrous to the Mexican army, but, notwithstanding this, he marched his army to Cerro Gordo, a distance not much short of one thousand miles by the line he had to travel, in time to intrench himself well before Scott got there. If he had been successful at Buena Vista his troops would no doubt have made a more stubborn resistance at Cerro Gordo. Had the battle of Buena Vista not been fought Santa Anna would have had time to move leisurely to meet the invader further south and with an army not demoralized nor depleted by defeat.
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