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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ved the post fund in the same way. There, however, was no profit except in the saving of flour by converting it into bread. In the spring of 1848 a party of officers obtained leave to visit Popocatapetl [Popocatepetl], the highest volcano in America, and to take an escort. I went with the party, many of whom afterwards occupied conspicuous positions before the country. Of those who went south, and attained high rank, there was Lieutenant Richard Anderson, who commanded a corps at Spottsylin going to Cuantla, descent enough had been made to occasion a material change in the climate and productions of the soil; but such is the case. In the morning we left a temperate climate where the cereals and fruits are those common to the United States; we halted in the evening in a tropical climate where the orange and banana, the coffee and the sugar-cane were flourishing. We had been travelling, apparently, on a plain all day, but in the direction of the flow of water. Soon after th
Tacubaya (Chihuahua, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 13
ies, with some silver, to accommodate the people who could not bet more than a few pennies at a time. In other booths silver formed the bulk of the capital of the bank, with a few doubloons to be changed if there should be a run of luck against the bank. In some there was no coin except gold. Here the rich were said to bet away their entire estates in a single day. All this is stopped now. For myself, I was kept somewhat busy during the winter of 1847-8. My regiment was stationed in Tacubaya. I was regimental quartermaster and commissary. General Scott had been unable to get clothing for the troops from the North. The men were becoming-well, they needed clothing. Material had to be purchased, such as could be obtained, and people employed to make it up into Yankee uniforms. A quartermaster in the city was designated to attend to this special duty; but clothing was so much needed that it was seized as fast as made up. A regiment was glad to get a dozen suits at a time. I h
Monterrey (Nuevo Leon, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 13
flour will make one hundred and forty pounds of bread. This saving was purchased by the commissary for the benefit of the fund. In the emergency the 4th infantry was laboring under, I rented a bakery in the city, hired bakers-Mexicans-bought fuel and whatever was necessary, and I also got a contract from the chief commissary of the army for baking a large amount of hard bread. In two months I made more money for the fund than my pay amounted to during the entire war. While stationed at Monterey I had relieved the post fund in the same way. There, however, was no profit except in the saving of flour by converting it into bread. In the spring of 1848 a party of officers obtained leave to visit Popocatapetl [Popocatepetl], the highest volcano in America, and to take an escort. I went with the party, many of whom afterwards occupied conspicuous positions before the country. Of those who went south, and attained high rank, there was Lieutenant Richard Anderson, who commanded a co
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Treaty of peace-mexican Bull fights-regimental quartermaster-trip to Popocatepetl-trip to the caves of Mexico The treaty of peace between the two countries was signed by the commissioners of each side early in February, 1848. It took a considerable time for it to reach Washington, receive the approval of the administration, and be finally ratified by the Senate. It was naturally supposed by the army that there would be no more fighting, and officers and men were of course anxious to get home, but knowing there must be delay they contented themselves as best they could. Every Sunday there was a bull fight for the amusement of those who would pay their fifty cents. I attended one of them-just one-not wishing to leave the country without having witnessed the national sport. The sight to me was sickening. I could not see how human beings could enjoy the sufferings of beasts, and often of men, as they seemed to do on these occasions. At these sports there are usually from fou
Acapulco (Guerrero, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 13
were entirely well and free from pain. The weather was clear and Popocatapetl stood out in all its beauty, the top looking as if not a mile away, and inviting us to return. About half the party were anxious to try the ascent again, and concluded to do so. The remainder-I was with the remainder-concluded that we had got all the pleasure there was to be had out of mountain climbing, and that we would visit the great caves of Mexico, some ninety miles from where we then were, on the road to Acapulco. The party that ascended the mountain the second time succeeded in reaching the crater at the top, with but little of the labor they encountered in their first attempt. Three of them-Anderson, Stone and Buckner-wrote accounts of their journey, which were published at the time. I made no notes of this excursion, and have read nothing about it since, but it seems to me that I can see the whole of it as vividly as if it were but yesterday. I have been back at Ameca Ameca, and the villa
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 13
of peace-mexican Bull fights-regimental quartermaster-trip to Popocatepetl-trip to the caves of Mexico The treaty of peace between the two countries was signed by the commissioners of each side eaa-and they are not an institution in any part of the country. During one of my recent visits to Mexico, bull fights were got up in my honor at Puebla and at Pachuca. I was not notified in advance soformance; but in both cases I civilly declined to attend. Another amusement of the people of Mexico of that day, and one which nearly all indulged in, male and female, old and young, priest and laleasure there was to be had out of mountain climbing, and that we would visit the great caves of Mexico, some ninety miles from where we then were, on the road to Acapulco. The party that ascended After a day's rest at Cuernavaca our party set out again on the journey to the great caves of Mexico. We had proceeded but a few miles when we were stopped, as before, by a guard and notified that
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ieved the post fund in the same way. There, however, was no profit except in the saving of flour by converting it into bread. In the spring of 1848 a party of officers obtained leave to visit Popocatapetl [Popocatepetl], the highest volcano in America, and to take an escort. I went with the party, many of whom afterwards occupied conspicuous positions before the country. Of those who went south, and attained high rank, there was Lieutenant Richard Anderson, who commanded a corps at Spottsylvania; Captain [H. H.] Sibley, a major-general, and, after the war, for a number of years in the employ of the Khedive of Egypt; Captain George Crittenden, a rebel general; S. B. Buckner, who surrendered Fort Donelson; and Mansfield Lovell, who commanded at New Orleans before that city fell into the hands of the National troops. Of those who remained on our side there were Captain Andrew Porter, Lieutenant C. P. Stone and Lieutenant Z. B. Tower. There were quite a number of other officers, w
Cuernavaca (Morelos, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 13
ermitted to occupy a vacant house outside the guard for the night, with the promise of a guide to put us on the road to Cuernavaca the next morning. Cuernavaca is a town west of Cuantla. The country through which we passed, between these two towCuernavaca is a town west of Cuantla. The country through which we passed, between these two towns, is tropical in climate and productions and rich in scenery. At one point, about half-way between the two places, the road goes over a low pass in the mountains in which there is a very quaint old town, the inhabitants of which at that day were howed no particular marks of architectural taste, mechanical skill or advanced civilization. The next day we went into Cuernavaca. After a day's rest at Cuernavaca our party set out again on the journey to the great caves of Mexico. We had procCuernavaca our party set out again on the journey to the great caves of Mexico. We had proceeded but a few miles when we were stopped, as before, by a guard and notified that the terms of the existing armistice did not permit us to go further in that direction. Upon convincing the guard that we were a mere party of pleasure seekers desiro
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): chapter 13
he edge of the town towards us. Our party halted, and I tied a white pocket handkerchief to a stick and, using it as a flag of truce, proceeded on to the town. Captains Sibley and Porter followed a few hundred yards behind. I was detained at the guard-house until a messenger could be dispatched to the quarters of the commanding general, who authorized that I should be conducted to him. I had been with the general but a few minutes when the two officers following announced themselves. The Mexican general reminded us that it was a violation of the truce for us to be there. However, as we had no special authority from our own commanding general, and as we knew nothing about the terms of the truce, we were permitted to occupy a vacant house outside the guard for the night, with the promise of a guide to put us on the road to Cuernavaca the next morning. Cuernavaca is a town west of Cuantla. The country through which we passed, between these two towns, is tropical in climate and p
Puebla (Puebla, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 13
confess that I felt sorry to see the cruelty to the bull and the horse. I did not stay for the conclusion of the performance; but while I did stay, there was not a bull killed in the prescribed way. Bull fights are now prohibited in the Federal District-embracing a territory around the City of Mexico, somewhat larger than the District of Columbia-and they are not an institution in any part of the country. During one of my recent visits to Mexico, bull fights were got up in my honor at Puebla and at Pachuca. I was not notified in advance so as [to] be able to decline and thus prevent the performance; but in both cases I civilly declined to attend. Another amusement of the people of Mexico of that day, and one which nearly all indulged in, male and female, old and young, priest and layman, was Monte playing. Regular feast weeks were held every year at what was then known as St. Augustin Tlalpam, eleven miles out of town. There were dealers to suit every class and condition
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