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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 27
who differed so radically with them on questions of government. I told him the troops would continue to occupy that church for the present, and that they would not be called upon to hear disloyal sentiments proclaimed from the pulpit. This closed the argument on the first point. Then came the second. The complainant said that he wanted the papers restored to him which had been surrendered to the provost-marshal under protest; he was a lawyer, and before the establishment of the Confederate States government had been the attorney for a number of large business houses at the North; that his government had confiscated all debts due alien enemies, and appointed commissioners, or officers, to collect such debts and pay them over to the government : but in his case, owing to his high standing, he had been permitted to hold these claims for collection, the responsible officials knowing that he would account to the government for every dollar received. He said that his government, wh
Rienzi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
eft as monuments to the skill of the engineer, and others were constructed in a few days, plainer in design but suited to the command available to defend them. I disposed the troops belonging to the district in conformity with the situation as rapidly as possible. The forces at Donelson, Clarksville and Nashville, with those at Corinth and along the railroad eastward, I regarded as sufficient for protection against any attack from the west. The Mobile and Ohio railroad was guarded from Rienzi. south of Corinth, to Columbus; and the Mississippi Central railroad from Jackson, Tennessee, to Bolivar. Grand Junction and La Grange on the Memphis railroad were abandoned. South of the Army of the Tennessee, and confronting it, was [Earl] Van Dorn, with a sufficient force to organize a movable army of thirty-five to forty thousand men, after being reinforced by [Sterling] Price from Missouri. This movable force could be thrown against either Corinth, Bolivar or Memphis; and the bes
Dover, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
is very comfortable summer home at Manitou Springs, Colorado. I reminded him of the above incident, and this drew from him the response that he was thankful now he had not captured me. I certainly was very thankful too. My occupation of Memphis as district headquarters did not last long [three weeks]. The period, however, was marked by a few incidents which were novel to me. Up to that time I had not occupied any place in the South where the citizens were at home in any great numbers. Dover was within the fortifications at Fort Donelson, and, as far as I remember, every citizen was gone. There were no people living at Pittsburg landing, and but very few at Corinth. Memphis, however, was a populous city, and there were many of the citizens remaining there who were not only thoroughly impressed with the justice of their cause, but who thought that even the Yankee soldiery must entertain the same views if they could only be induced to make an honest confession. It took hours of
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ost, who was a thorough Southern gentleman fully convinced of the justice of secession. After dinner, seated in the capacious porch, he entertained me with a recital of the services he was rendering the cause. He was too old to be in the ranks himself-he must have been quite seventy then-but his means enabled him to be useful in other ways. In ordinary times the homestead where he was now living produced the bread and meat to supply the slaves on his main plantation, in the lowlands of Mississippi. Now he raised food and forage on both places, and thought he would have that year a surplus sufficient to feed three hundred families of poor men who had gone into the war and left their families dependent upon the patriotism of those better off. The crops around me looked fine, and I had at the moment an idea that about the time they were ready to be gathered the Yankee troops would be in the neighborhood and harvest them for the benefit of those engaged in the suppression of the rebel
Booneville (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ty on his staff. During the advance on Corinth a vacancy occurred in the colonelcy of the 2d Michigan cavalry. Governor Blair, of Michigan, telegraphed General Halleck asking him to suggest the name of a professional soldier for the vacancy, saying he would appoint a good man without reference to his State. Sheridan was named; and was so conspicuously efficient that when Corinth was reached he was assigned to command a cavalry brigade in the Army of the Mississippi. He was in command at Booneville on the 1st of July with two small regiments, when he was attacked by a force full three times as numerous as his own. By very skilful manoeuvres and boldness of attack he completely routed the enemy. For this he was made a brigadiergeneral and became a conspicuous figure in the army about Corinth. On this account I was sorry to see him leaving me. His departure was probably fortunate, for he rendered distinguished services in his new field. Granger and Sheridan reached Louisville be
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
nstructed in a few days, plainer in design but suited to the command available to defend them. I disposed the troops belonging to the district in conformity with the situation as rapidly as possible. The forces at Donelson, Clarksville and Nashville, with those at Corinth and along the railroad eastward, I regarded as sufficient for protection against any attack from the west. The Mobile and Ohio railroad was guarded from Rienzi. south of Corinth, to Columbus; and the Mississippi Centralen required to repair the railroad as he advanced, the march could have been made in eighteen days at the outside, and Chattanooga must have been reached by the National forces before the rebels could have possibly got there. The road between Nashville and Chattanooga could easily have been put in repair by other troops, so that communication with the North would have been opened in a short time after the occupation of the place by the National troops. If Buell had been permitted to move in
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
it, was [Earl] Van Dorn, with a sufficient force to organize a movable army of thirty-five to forty thousand men, after being reinforced by [Sterling] Price from Missouri. This movable force could be thrown against either Corinth, Bolivar or Memphis; and the best that could be done in such event would be to weaken the points not the war broke out. He was promoted to a captaincy in May, 1861, and before the close of the year managed in some way, I do not know how, to get East. He went to Missouri. Halleck had known him as a very successful young officer in managing campaigns against the Indians on the Pacific coast, and appointed him acting-quartermaster in south-west Missouri. There was no difficulty in getting supplies forward while Sheridan served in that capacity; but he got into difficulty with his immediate superiors because of his stringent rules for preventing the use of public transportation for private purposes. He asked to be relieved from further duty in the capacity
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
repair the Memphis and Charleston railroad as he advanced. Troops had been sent north by Halleck along the line of the Mobile and Ohio railroad to put it in repair as far as Columbus. Other troops were stationed on the railroad from Jackson, Tennessee, to Grand Junction, and still others on the road west to Memphis. The remainder of the magnificent army of 120,000 men which entered Corinth on the 30th of May had now become so scattered that I was put entirely on the defensive in a teinth and along the railroad eastward, I regarded as sufficient for protection against any attack from the west. The Mobile and Ohio railroad was guarded from Rienzi. south of Corinth, to Columbus; and the Mississippi Central railroad from Jackson, Tennessee, to Bolivar. Grand Junction and La Grange on the Memphis railroad were abandoned. South of the Army of the Tennessee, and confronting it, was [Earl] Van Dorn, with a sufficient force to organize a movable army of thirty-five to forty t
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
e was thankful now he had not captured me. I certainly was very thankful too. My occupation of Memphis as district headquarters did not last long [three weeks]. The period, however, was marked by a few incidents which were novel to me. Up to that time I had not occupied any place in the South where the citizens were at home in any great numbers. Dover was within the fortifications at Fort Donelson, and, as far as I remember, every citizen was gone. There were no people living at Pittsburg landing, and but very few at Corinth. Memphis, however, was a populous city, and there were many of the citizens remaining there who were not only thoroughly impressed with the justice of their cause, but who thought that even the Yankee soldiery must entertain the same views if they could only be induced to make an honest confession. It took hours of my time every day to listen to complaints and requests. The latter were generally reasonable, and if so they were granted; but the complaints
Grand Junction (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
long the line of the Mobile and Ohio railroad to put it in repair as far as Columbus. Other troops were stationed on the railroad from Jackson, Tennessee, to Grand Junction, and still others on the road west to Memphis. The remainder of the magnificent army of 120,000 men which entered Corinth on the 30th of May had now become Mobile and Ohio railroad was guarded from Rienzi. south of Corinth, to Columbus; and the Mississippi Central railroad from Jackson, Tennessee, to Bolivar. Grand Junction and La Grange on the Memphis railroad were abandoned. South of the Army of the Tennessee, and confronting it, was [Earl] Van Dorn, with a sufficient forceChattanooga and his wagon train marching overland to join him at Rome. Price was at this time at Holly Springs, Mississippi, with a large force, and occupied Grand Junction as an outpost. I proposed to the genera-Lin-chief to be permitted to drive him away, but was informed that, while I had to judge for myself, the best use to
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