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Bayou Pierre Lake (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
orce of nearly sixty thousand men. Jackson is fifty miles east of Vicksburg and is connected with it by a railroad. My first problem was to capture Grand Gulf to use as a base. Bruinsburg is two miles from high ground. The bottom at that point is higher than most of the low land in the valley of the Mississippi, and a good road leads to the bluff. It was natural to expect the garrison from Grand Gulf to come out to meet us and prevent, if they could, our reaching this solid base. Bayou Pierre enters the Mississippi just above Bruinsburg and, as it is a navigable stream and was high at the time, in order to intercept us they had to go by Port Gibson, the nearest point where there was a bridge to cross upon. This more than doubled the distance from Grand Gulf to the high land back of Bruinsburg. No time was to be lost in securing this foothold. Our transportation was not sufficient to move all the army across the river at one trip, or even two; but the landing of the 13th cor
Rodney (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
It may be that the enemy will occupy positions back from the city, out of range of the gunboats, so as to make it desirable to run past Grand Gulf and land at Rodney. In case this should prove the plan, a signal will be arranged and you duly informed, when the transports are to start with this view. Or, it may be expedient fan army across but for a levee. I had had this explored before, as well as the east bank below to ascertain if there was a possible point of debarkation north of Rodney. It was found that the top of the levee afforded a good road to march upon. Porter, as was always the case with him, not only acquiesced in the plan, but volbout nine miles below, to find a landing; but that night a colored man came in who informed me that a good landing would be found at Bruinsburg, a few miles above Rodney, from which point there was a good road leading to Port Gibson some twelve miles in the interior. The information was found correct, and our landing was effected
Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
shore of the river where we might land above Grand Gulf. There was none practicable. Accordingly ts farther down the river and nearly opposite Grand Gulf. The loss of two steamers and six barges reuld land and move by forced marches to below Grand Gulf, re-embark rapidly and proceed to the lattersports can run down and debark the troops at Grand Gulf; one, that the transports can run by withouteye as I boarded the ship was sickening. Grand Gulf is on a high bluff where the river runs at tnd from the Louisiana side extending towards Grand Gulf, made by the river running nearly east from ation. Now that all our gunboats were below Grand Gulf it was possible that the enemy might fit outy-three thousand men. The enemy occupied Grand Gulf, Haines' Bluff and Jackson with a force of na railroad. My first problem was to capture Grand Gulf to use as a base. Bruinsburg is two milen. This more than doubled the distance from Grand Gulf to the high land back of Bruinsburg. No tim[9 more...]
Lake Saint Joseph, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
roops were set in motion for Hard Times, twenty-two miles farther down the river and nearly opposite Grand Gulf. The loss of two steamers and six barges reduced our transportation so that only 10,000 men could be moved by water. Some of the steamers that had got below were injured in their machinery, so that they were only useful as barges towed by those less severely injured. All the troops, therefore, except what could be transported in one trip, had to march. The road lay west of Lake St. Joseph. Three large bayous had to be crossed. They were rapidly bridged in the same manner as those previously encountered. On the 27th McClernand's corps was all at Hard Times, and McPherson's was following closely. I had determined to make the attempt to effect a landing on the east side of the river as soon as possible. Accordingly, on the morning of the 29th, McClernand was directed to embark all the troops from his corps that our transports and barges could carry. About 10,000 men
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
as possible. Accordingly, on the morning of the 29th, McClernand was directed to embark all the troops from his corps that our transports and barges could carry. About 10,000 men was so embarked. The plan was to have the navy silence the guns at Grand Gulf, and to have as many men as possible ready to debark in the shortest possible time under cover of the fire of the navy and carry the works by storm. The following order was issued: Note: On this occasion Governor Richard Yates, of Illinois, happened to be on a visit to the army, and accompanied me to Carthage. I furnished an ambulance for his use and that of some of the State officers who accompanied him. Perkins' Plantation, La., April 27, 1863 Major-General J. A. McClernand, Commanding 13th A. C. Commence immediately the embarkation of your corps, or so much of it as there is transportation for. Have put aboard the artillery and every article authorized in orders limiting baggage, except the men, and hold them in read
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
r eight thousand men, under General [John S.] Bowen. His hope was to hold me in check until reinforcements under [Gen. William W.] Loring could reach him from Vicksburg; but Loring did not come in time to render much assistance south of Port Gibson. Two brigades of McPherson's corps followed McClernand as fast as rations and ammunition could be issued, and were ready to take position upon the battlefield whenever the 13th corps could be got out of the way. The country in this part of Mississippi stands on edge, as it were, the roads running along the ridges except when they occasionally pass from one ridge to another. Where there are no clearings the sides of the hills are covered with a very heavy growth of timber and with undergrowth, and the ravines are filled with vines and canebrakes, almost impenetrable. This makes it easy for an inferior force to delay, if not defeat, a far superior one. Near the point selected by Bowen to defend, the road to Port Gibson divides, tak
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Attack on Grand Gulf-operations below Vicksburg On the 24th my headquarters were with the advaof it. It is as defensible upon its front as Vicksburg and, at that time, would have been just as i Sherman had not left his position above Vicksburg yet. On the morning of the 27th I ordered hicompel Pemberton to keep as much force about Vicksburg as I could, until I could secure a good footwards learned, created great confusion about Vicksburg and doubts about our real design. Sherman md eight gunboats which Porter had left above Vicksburg. He debarked his troops and apparently mree of relief scarcely ever equalled since. Vicksburg was not yet taken it is true, nor were its dtry, with a vast river and the stronghold of Vicksburg between me and my base of supplies. But I whousand men. Jackson is fifty miles east of Vicksburg and is connected with it by a railroad. My s the starting point of roads to Grand Gulf, Vicksburg and Jackson. McClernand's advance met th[1 more...]
Bruinsburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ng; but that night a colored man came in who informed me that a good landing would be found at Bruinsburg, a few miles above Rodney, from which point there was a good road leading to Port Gibson some The embarkation below Grand Gulf took place at De Shroon's, Louisiana, six miles above Bruinsburg, Mississippi. Early on the morning of 30th of April McClernand's corps and one division of McPhersoected with it by a railroad. My first problem was to capture Grand Gulf to use as a base. Bruinsburg is two miles from high ground. The bottom at that point is higher than most of the low land i, if they could, our reaching this solid base. Bayou Pierre enters the Mississippi just above Bruinsburg and, as it is a navigable stream and was high at the time, in order to intercept us they had te to cross upon. This more than doubled the distance from Grand Gulf to the high land back of Bruinsburg. No time was to be lost in securing this foothold. Our transportation was not sufficient to
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ight fit out boats in the Big Black with improvised armament and attempt to destroy these supplies. McPherson was at Hard Times with a portion of his corps, and the depot was protected by a part of his command. The night of the 29th I directed him to arm one of the transports with artillery and send it up to Perkins' plantation as a guard; and also to have the siege guns we had brought along moved there and put in position. The embarkation below Grand Gulf took place at De Shroon's, Louisiana, six miles above Bruinsburg, Mississippi. Early on the morning of 30th of April McClernand's corps and one division of McPherson's corps were speedily landed. When this was effected I felt a degree of relief scarcely ever equalled since. Vicksburg was not yet taken it is true, nor were its defenders demoralized by any of our previous moves. I was now in the enemy's country, with a vast river and the stronghold of Vicksburg between me and my base of supplies. But I was on dry ground
Port Gibson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
odney, from which point there was a good road leading to Port Gibson some twelve miles in the interior. The information was at the time, in order to intercept us they had to go by Port Gibson, the nearest point where there was a bridge to cross upoore sunset and McClernand was pushed on, hoping to reach Port Gibson and save the bridge spanning the Bayou Pierre before thestream in the presence of an enemy is always difficult. Port Gibson, too, is the starting point of roads to Grand Gulf, Vickernand's advance met the enemy about five miles west of Port Gibson at Thompson's plantation. There was some firing during did not come in time to render much assistance south of Port Gibson. Two brigades of McPherson's corps followed McClernand a Near the point selected by Bowen to defend, the road to Port Gibson divides, taking two ridges which do not diverge more thawed up our victory until night overtook us about two miles from Port Gibson; then the troops went into bivouac for the night.
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