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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war. Search the whole document.

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Quaker (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
with walnut hulls, and made them light or dark brown, as we wished. Then we ripped up our tarlatan partydresses of red, white, blue, or buff, some all gold and silver bespangled, to trim hats with. Neighbor would divide with neighbor the tarlatan for trimming purposes, and some would go quite a distance for only enough to trim a hat. For the plumes of our hats or bonnets the feathers of the old drake answered admirably, and were often plucked, as many will remember, for that very purpose. Quaker or Shaker bonnets were also woven by the women of Alabama out of the bulrushes that grew very tall in marshy places. These rushes were placed in the opening of the threads of warp by hand, and were woven the same as if the shuttle had passed them through. Those the width of the warp were always used. The bonnets were cut in shape and lined with tarlatan. The skirt of the Shaker was made of single sleyed cloth, as we called it. In common woven heavy cloth two threads of warp were pass
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
th was dyed. how shoes, thread, hats, and bonnets were manufactured There was some pleasant rivalry as to who should be the most successful in producing the brightest and clearest tinge of color on thread or cloth. Most of the women of southern Alabama had small plats of ground for cultivating the indigo bush, for making indigo blue, or indigo mud, as it was sometimes called. The indigo weed also grew abundantly in the wild state in our vicinage. Those who did not care to bother with indor only enough to trim a hat. For the plumes of our hats or bonnets the feathers of the old drake answered admirably, and were often plucked, as many will remember, for that very purpose. Quaker or Shaker bonnets were also woven by the women of Alabama out of the bulrushes that grew very tall in marshy places. These rushes were placed in the opening of the threads of warp by hand, and were woven the same as if the shuttle had passed them through. Those the width of the warp were always used