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Robert Tyler (search for this): chapter 11
ied and Christianized upon the inauguration of the permanent government. January 11 We have three candidates in the field in this district for Congress: President Tyler, James Lyons, and Wm. II. McFarland. The first will, of course, walk over the track. January 12 Gen. Wise, whose headquarters are to be fixed at Nag's he government. Mr. Benjamin reminded me of Daniel Webster, when he used to make solemn declarations that his friends in office were likewise the partisans of President Tyler. January 17 A Mr. O. Hendricks, verylately of the U. S. Coast Survey, has returned from a tour of the coast of North Carolina, and has been commissioned January 25 The French players have been permitted by the Secretary to leave the country. But British subjects are now refused passports. January 26 President Tyler has been elected to Congress by an overwhelming majority. January 27 The Secretary of War has issued such a peremptory order to Gen. Wise, that the latt
W. H. McFarland (search for this): chapter 11
d he is a regular attendant at St. Paul's Church. I am rather inclined to credit the rumor that he intends to join the church. All his messages and proclamations indicate that he is looking to a mightier power than England for assistance. There is a general desire to have the cabinet modified and Christianized upon the inauguration of the permanent government. January 11 We have three candidates in the field in this district for Congress: President Tyler, James Lyons, and Wm. II. McFarland. The first will, of course, walk over the track. January 12 Gen. Wise, whose headquarters are to be fixed at Nag's Head on the beach near Roanoke Island, reports that the force he commands is altogether inadequate to defend the position. Burnside is said to have 20,000 men, besides a numerous fleet of gun-boats; and Gen. Wise has but 3000 effective men. January 13 The department leaves Gen. Wise to his superior officer, Gen. Huger, at Norfolk, who has 15,000 men. But I underst
J. H. Winder (search for this): chapter 11
tates the United States will soon come to them. Many believe that Burnside will get Norfolk. I think differently, but I may be mistaken. January 22 Some of the letter-carriers' passports from Mr. Benjamin, which have the countenance of Gen. Winder, are now going into Tennessee. What is this for? We shall see. January 23 Again the Northern papers give the most extravagant numbers to our army in Kentucky. Some estimates are as high as 150,000. I know, and Mr. Benjamin knows, thanerated around him. January 30 Some of the mysterious letter-carriers, who have just returned from their jaunt into Tennessee, are applying again for passports to Baltimore, Washington, etc. I refuse them, though they are recommended by Gen. Winder's men; but they will obtain what they want from the Secretary himself, or his Assistant Secretary. January 31 What if these men (they have passports) should be going to Washington to report the result of their reconnoissances in Tennesse
Judah P. Benjamin (search for this): chapter 11
nothing afloat to oppose to them. And there is no entente cordiale between Mr. Benjamin and any of our best generals. January 4 It is just as I feared. Gen. uate positions, and revolutions are mutable things. January 16 To-day, Mr. Benjamin, whom I met in the hall of the department, said, I don't grant any passportssports within thirty days; and these were not all agents of the government. Mr. Benjamin reminded me of Daniel Webster, when he used to make solemn declarations thatay be mistaken. January 22 Some of the letter-carriers' passports from Mr. Benjamin, which have the countenance of Gen. Winder, are now going into Tennessee. Wo our army in Kentucky. Some estimates are as high as 150,000. I know, and Mr. Benjamin knows, that Gen. Johnston has not exceeding 29,000 effective men. And the Se can he, a modest man and a Christian, aspire to such a position? Would not Mr. Benjamin throw his influence against such a suggestion? I trust the President will s
L. P. Walker (search for this): chapter 11
ment. Mr. Benjamin reminded me of Daniel Webster, when he used to make solemn declarations that his friends in office were likewise the partisans of President Tyler. January 17 A Mr. O. Hendricks, verylately of the U. S. Coast Survey, has returned from a tour of the coast of North Carolina, and has been commissioned a lieutenant by the Secretary of War. He says Burnside will take Roanoke Island, and that Wise and all his men will be captured. It is a man-trap. January 18 Gen. L. P. Walker, the first Secretary of War, is assigned to duty in the Southwest under Gen. Bragg. How can he obey the orders of one who was so recently under his command? I think it probable he will resign again before the end of the campaign. January 19 There has been a storm on the coast, sinking some of the enemy's ships. Col. Allen, of New Jersey, was lost. He was once at my house in Burlington, and professed to be friendly to the Southern cause. I think he said he owned land and sla
H. W. Allen (search for this): chapter 11
by the Secretary of War. He says Burnside will take Roanoke Island, and that Wise and all his men will be captured. It is a man-trap. January 18 Gen. L. P. Walker, the first Secretary of War, is assigned to duty in the Southwest under Gen. Bragg. How can he obey the orders of one who was so recently under his command? I think it probable he will resign again before the end of the campaign. January 19 There has been a storm on the coast, sinking some of the enemy's ships. Col. Allen, of New Jersey, was lost. He was once at my house in Burlington, and professed to be friendly to the Southern cause. I think he said he owned land and slaves in Texas. January 20 Mr. Memminger advertises to pay interest on certain government bonds in specie. That won't last long. He is paying 50 per cent. premium in treasury notes for the specie, and the bonds are given for treasury notes. What sort of financiering is this? January 21 A great number of Germans and others ar
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 11
tions that his friends in office were likewise the partisans of President Tyler. January 17 A Mr. O. Hendricks, verylately of the U. S. Coast Survey, has returned from a tour of the coast of North Carolina, and has been commissioned a lieutenant by the Secretary of War. He says Burnside will take Roanoke Island, and that Wise and all his men will be captured. It is a man-trap. January 18 Gen. L. P. Walker, the first Secretary of War, is assigned to duty in the Southwest under Gen. Bragg. How can he obey the orders of one who was so recently under his command? I think it probable he will resign again before the end of the campaign. January 19 There has been a storm on the coast, sinking some of the enemy's ships. Col. Allen, of New Jersey, was lost. He was once at my house in Burlington, and professed to be friendly to the Southern cause. I think he said he owned land and slaves in Texas. January 20 Mr. Memminger advertises to pay interest on certain gove
X. January, 1862 Seward gives up Mason and Slidell. great preparations of the enemy. Gen. Jackson betrayed. Mr. Memminger's blunders. exaggerated reports of our troops in Kentucky and Tennessee. January 1 Seward has cowered beneath the roar of the British Lion, and surrendered Mason and Slidell, who have been permitted to go on their errand to England. Now we must depend upon our own strong arms and stout hearts for defense. January 2 The enemy are making preparatioSlidell, who have been permitted to go on their errand to England. Now we must depend upon our own strong arms and stout hearts for defense. January 2 The enemy are making preparations to assail us everywhere. Roanoke Island, Norfolk, Beaufort, and Newbern; Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, Pensacola, and New Orleans are all menaced by numerous fleets on the sea-board, and in the West great numbers of iron-clad floating batteries threaten to force a passage down the Mississippi, while monster armies are concentrating for the invasion of Tennessee and the Cotton States. Will Virginia escape the scourge? Not she; here is the bulls-eye of the mark they aim at. January 3
John Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 11
d their families, as if this government was the property of the few men who happen to wield power at the present moment. Arrogance and presumption in the South must, sooner or later, have a fall. The great men who were the leaders of this revolution may be ignored, but they cannot be kept down by the smaller fry who aspire to wield the destinies of a great and patriotic people. Smith and Lovell, New York politicians and Street Commissioners, have been made major-generals, while Wise and Breckinridge are brigadiers. January 28 There must soon be collisions in the West on a large scale; but the system of lying, in vogue among the Yankees, most effectually defeats all attempts at reliable computation of numbers. They say we have 150,000 men in Tennessee and Kentucky, whereas we have not 60,000. Their own numbers they represent to be not exceeding 50,000, but I suspect they have three times that number. The shadows of events are crowding thickly upon us, and the events will spea
sland. He will deserve promotion. The government seems to have proscribed the great men of the past and their families, as if this government was the property of the few men who happen to wield power at the present moment. Arrogance and presumption in the South must, sooner or later, have a fall. The great men who were the leaders of this revolution may be ignored, but they cannot be kept down by the smaller fry who aspire to wield the destinies of a great and patriotic people. Smith and Lovell, New York politicians and Street Commissioners, have been made major-generals, while Wise and Breckinridge are brigadiers. January 28 There must soon be collisions in the West on a large scale; but the system of lying, in vogue among the Yankees, most effectually defeats all attempts at reliable computation of numbers. They say we have 150,000 men in Tennessee and Kentucky, whereas we have not 60,000. Their own numbers they represent to be not exceeding 50,000, but I suspect they hav
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