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XIII. April, 1862 Gen. Beauregard succeeds Gen. Sydney Johnston. Dibble, the traitor. enemy at Fredericksburg. they say we will be subdued by the 15th of June. Lee rapidly concentrating at Richmond. Webster, the spy, hung. April 1 Gen. Sydney Johnston having fallen in battle, the command in the West devolved on Gen. Beauregard, whose recent defense at Island No.10 on the Mississippi, has revived his popularity. But, I repeat, he is a doomed man. April 2 Gen. Wise is here with his report of the Roanoke disaster. April 3 Congress is investigating the Roanoke affair. Mr. Benjamin has been denounced in Congress by Mr. Foote and others as the sole cause of the calamities which have befallen the country. I wrote a letter to the President, offering to show that I had given no passport to Mr. Dibble, the traitor, and also the evidences, in his own handwriting, that Mr. Benjamin granted it. April 4 The enemy are shelling our camp at Yorktown. I c
XIII. April, 1862 Gen. Beauregard succeeds Gen. Sydney Johnston. Dibble, the traitor. enemy at Fredericksburg. they say we will be subdued by the 15th of June. Lee rapidly concentrating at Richmond. Webster, the spy, hung. April 1 Gen. Sydney Johnston having fallen in battle, the command in the West devolved on Gen. Beauregard, whose recent defense at Island No.10 on the Mississippi, has revived his popularity. But, I repeat, he is a doomed man. April 2 Gen. Wise is here with his report of the Roanoke disaster. April 3 Congress is investigating the Roanoke affair. Mr. Benjamin has been denounced in Congress by Mr. Foote and others as the sole cause of the calamities which have befallen the country. I wrote a letter to the President, offering to show that I had given no passport to Mr. Dibble, the traitor, and also the evidences, in his own handwriting, that Mr. Benjamin granted it. April 4 The enemy are shelling our camp at Yorktown. I c
Gen. Sydney Johnston. Dibble, the traitor. enemy at Fredericksburg. they say we will be subdued by the 15th of June. Lee rapidly concentrating at Richmond. Webster, the spy, hung. April 1 Gen. Sydney Johnston having fallen in battle, the command in the West devolved on Gen. Beauregard, whose recent defense at Island No.10 on the Mississippi, has revived his popularity. But, I repeat, he is a doomed man. April 2 Gen. Wise is here with his report of the Roanoke disaster. April 3 Congress is investigating the Roanoke affair. Mr. Benjamin has been denounced in Congress by Mr. Foote and others as the sole cause of the calamities which have befallen the country. I wrote a letter to the President, offering to show that I had given no passport to Mr. Dibble, the traitor, and also the evidences, in his own handwriting, that Mr. Benjamin granted it. April 4 The enemy are shelling our camp at Yorktown. I can hear the reports of the guns, of a damp evening. W
I repeat, he is a doomed man. April 2 Gen. Wise is here with his report of the Roanoke disaster. April 3 Congress is investigating the Roanoke affair. Mr. Benjamin has been denounced in Congress by Mr. Foote and others as the sole cause of the calamities which have befallen the country. I wrote a letter to the President, offering to show that I had given no passport to Mr. Dibble, the traitor, and also the evidences, in his own handwriting, that Mr. Benjamin granted it. April 4 The enemy are shelling our camp at Yorktown. I can hear the reports of the guns, of a damp evening. We are sending back defiance with our guns. The President has not taken any notice of my communication. Mr. Benjamin is too powerful to be affected by such proofs of such small matters. April 5 Newbern, N. C., has fallen into the hands of the enemy! Our men, though opposed by greatly superior numbers, made a brave resistance, and killed and wounded 1000 of the invaders. T
wrote a letter to the President, offering to show that I had given no passport to Mr. Dibble, the traitor, and also the evidences, in his own handwriting, that Mr. Benjamin granted it. April 4 The enemy are shelling our camp at Yorktown. I can hear the reports of the guns, of a damp evening. We are sending back defiance with our guns. The President has not taken any notice of my communication. Mr. Benjamin is too powerful to be affected by such proofs of such small matters. April 5 Newbern, N. C., has fallen into the hands of the enemy! Our men, though opposed by greatly superior numbers, made a brave resistance, and killed and wounded 1000 of the invaders. The enemy were piloted up the river to Newbern by the same Mr. Dibble to whom I refused a passport, but to whom the Secretary of War granted one. The press everywhere is commenting on the case of Dibble-but Mordecai still sits at the gate. April 6 Two spies (Lincoln's detective police) have been
be affected by such proofs of such small matters. April 5 Newbern, N. C., has fallen into the hands of the enemy! Our men, though opposed by greatly superior numbers, made a brave resistance, and killed and wounded 1000 of the invaders. The enemy were piloted up the river to Newbern by the same Mr. Dibble to whom I refused a passport, but to whom the Secretary of War granted one. The press everywhere is commenting on the case of Dibble-but Mordecai still sits at the gate. April 6 Two spies (Lincoln's detective police) have been arrested here, tried by court-martial, and condemned to be hung. There is an awful silence among the Baltimore detectives, which bodes no harm to the condemned. They will not be executed, though guilty. April 7 R. G. H. Kean, a young man, and a connection of Mr. Randolph, has been appointed Chief of the Bureau of War in place of Col. Bledsoe, resigned at last. Mr. Kean was, I believe, a lieutenant when Mr. Randolph was colonel, a
ed up the river to Newbern by the same Mr. Dibble to whom I refused a passport, but to whom the Secretary of War granted one. The press everywhere is commenting on the case of Dibble-but Mordecai still sits at the gate. April 6 Two spies (Lincoln's detective police) have been arrested here, tried by court-martial, and condemned to be hung. There is an awful silence among the Baltimore detectives, which bodes no harm to the condemned. They will not be executed, though guilty. April 7 R. G. H. Kean, a young man, and a connection of Mr. Randolph, has been appointed Chief of the Bureau of War in place of Col. Bledsoe, resigned at last. Mr. Kean was, I believe, a lieutenant when Mr. Randolph was colonel, and acted as his adjutant. April 8 Col. Bledsoe has been appointed Assistant Secretary of War by the President. Now he is in his glory, and has forgotten me. April 9 There are several young officers who have sheathed the sword, and propose to draw the pen i
ctive police) have been arrested here, tried by court-martial, and condemned to be hung. There is an awful silence among the Baltimore detectives, which bodes no harm to the condemned. They will not be executed, though guilty. April 7 R. G. H. Kean, a young man, and a connection of Mr. Randolph, has been appointed Chief of the Bureau of War in place of Col. Bledsoe, resigned at last. Mr. Kean was, I believe, a lieutenant when Mr. Randolph was colonel, and acted as his adjutant. April 8 Col. Bledsoe has been appointed Assistant Secretary of War by the President. Now he is in his glory, and has forgotten me. April 9 There are several young officers who have sheathed the sword, and propose to draw the pen in the civil service. To-day I asked of the department a month's respite from labor, and obtained it. But I remained in the city, and watched closely, still hoping I might serve the cause, or at least prevent more injury to it, from the wicked facility hithert
etectives, which bodes no harm to the condemned. They will not be executed, though guilty. April 7 R. G. H. Kean, a young man, and a connection of Mr. Randolph, has been appointed Chief of the Bureau of War in place of Col. Bledsoe, resigned at last. Mr. Kean was, I believe, a lieutenant when Mr. Randolph was colonel, and acted as his adjutant. April 8 Col. Bledsoe has been appointed Assistant Secretary of War by the President. Now he is in his glory, and has forgotten me. April 9 There are several young officers who have sheathed the sword, and propose to draw the pen in the civil service. To-day I asked of the department a month's respite from labor, and obtained it. But I remained in the city, and watched closely, still hoping I might serve the cause, or at least prevent more injury to it, from the wicked facility hitherto enjoyed by spies to leave the country. April 10 The condemned spies have implicated Webster, the letter-carrier, who has had so ma
April 10th (search for this): chapter 14
t Secretary of War by the President. Now he is in his glory, and has forgotten me. April 9 There are several young officers who have sheathed the sword, and propose to draw the pen in the civil service. To-day I asked of the department a month's respite from labor, and obtained it. But I remained in the city, and watched closely, still hoping I might serve the cause, or at least prevent more injury to it, from the wicked facility hitherto enjoyed by spies to leave the country. April 10 The condemned spies have implicated Webster, the letter-carrier, who has had so many passports. He will hang, probably. Gen. Winder himself, and his policemen, wrote home by him. I don't believe him any more guilty than many who used to write by him; and I mean to tell the Judge Advocate so, if they give me an opportunity. April 11 The enemy are at Fredericksburg, and the Yankee papers say it will be all over with us by the 15th of June. I doubt that. April 12 The committe
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