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R. G. H. Kean (search for this): chapter 14
tive police) have been arrested here, tried by court-martial, and condemned to be hung. There is an awful silence among the Baltimore detectives, which bodes no harm to the condemned. They will not be executed, though guilty. April 7 R. G. H. Kean, a young man, and a connection of Mr. Randolph, has been appointed Chief of the Bureau of War in place of Col. Bledsoe, resigned at last. Mr. Kean was, I believe, a lieutenant when Mr. Randolph was colonel, and acted as his adjutant. ApriMr. Kean was, I believe, a lieutenant when Mr. Randolph was colonel, and acted as his adjutant. April 8 Col. Bledsoe has been appointed Assistant Secretary of War by the President. Now he is in his glory, and has forgotten me. April 9 There are several young officers who have sheathed the sword, and propose to draw the pen in the civil service. To-day I asked of the department a month's respite from labor, and obtained it. But I remained in the city, and watched closely, still hoping I might serve the cause, or at least prevent more injury to it, from the wicked facility hitherto
Sydney Johnston (search for this): chapter 14
XIII. April, 1862 Gen. Beauregard succeeds Gen. Sydney Johnston. Dibble, the traitor. enemy at Fredericksburg. they say we will be subdued by the 15th of June. Lee rapidly concentrating at Richmond. Webster, the spy, hung. April 1 Gen. Sydney Johnston having fallen in battle, the command in the West devolvedGen. Sydney Johnston having fallen in battle, the command in the West devolved on Gen. Beauregard, whose recent defense at Island No.10 on the Mississippi, has revived his popularity. But, I repeat, he is a doomed man. April 2 Gen. Wise is here with his report of the Roanoke disaster. April 3 Congress is investigating the Roanoke affair. Mr. Benjamin has been denounced in Congress by Mr. Foote-but the work of preparation goes on night and day. April 28 We have rumors of an important cabinet meeting, wherein it was resolved to advise or command Gen. Johnston to evacuate Yorktown and retire toward Richmond! Also that Norfolk is to be given up! I don't believe it; Lee's name is not mentioned. April 29 Major G
o write by him; and I mean to tell the Judge Advocate so, if they give me an opportunity. April 11 The enemy are at Fredericksburg, and the Yankee papers say it will be all over with us by the 15th of June. I doubt that. April 12 The committee (Congressional) which have been investigating the Roanoke Island disaster have come to the conclusion, unanimously, and the House has voted accordingly, and with unanimity, that the blame and guilt of that great calamity rest solely upon Gen. Huger and Judah P. Benjamin. April 13 Gen. Wise now resolved to ask for another command, to make another effort in defense of his country. But, when he waited upon the Secretary of War, he ascertained that there was no brigade for him. Returning from thence, some of his officers, who had escaped the trap at Roanoke, crowded round him to learn the issue of his application. There is no Secretary of War I said he. What is Randolph? asked one. He is not Secretary of War! said
t Fredericksburg. they say we will be subdued by the 15th of June. Lee rapidly concentrating at Richmond. Webster, the spy, hung. April April 16 Troops are being concentrated rapidly in Virginia by Gen. Lee. April 17 To-day Congress passed an act providing for the temned, and hung. April 25 Gen. Wise, through the influence of Gen. Lee, who is a Christian gentleman as well as a consummate general, has but not with Beauregard. The President has unbounded confidence in Lee's capacity, modest as he is. Another change! Provost Marshal Goiswold, whose family is now in the enemy's country. April 26 Gen. Lee is doing good service in bringing forward reinforcements from the general. The President wisely agreed to the terms. April 27 Gen. Lee is calm-but the work of preparation goes on night and day. ApriRichmond! Also that Norfolk is to be given up! I don't believe it; Lee's name is not mentioned. April 29 Major Griswold is here, and
on. Mr. Benjamin is too powerful to be affected by such proofs of such small matters. April 5 Newbern, N. C., has fallen into the hands of the enemy! Our men, though opposed by greatly superior numbers, made a brave resistance, and killed and wounded 1000 of the invaders. The enemy were piloted up the river to Newbern by the same Mr. Dibble to whom I refused a passport, but to whom the Secretary of War granted one. The press everywhere is commenting on the case of Dibble-but Mordecai still sits at the gate. April 6 Two spies (Lincoln's detective police) have been arrested here, tried by court-martial, and condemned to be hung. There is an awful silence among the Baltimore detectives, which bodes no harm to the condemned. They will not be executed, though guilty. April 7 R. G. H. Kean, a young man, and a connection of Mr. Randolph, has been appointed Chief of the Bureau of War in place of Col. Bledsoe, resigned at last. Mr. Kean was, I believe, a lieutena
but not with Beauregard. The President has unbounded confidence in Lee's capacity, modest as he is. Another change! Provost Marshal Godwin, for rebuking the Baltimore chief of police, is to leave us, and to be succeeded by a Marylander, Major Griswold, whose family is now in the enemy's country. April 26 Gen. Lee is doing good service in bringing forward reinforcements from the South against the day of trial-and an awful day awaits us. It is understood that he made fully known to theApril 27 Gen. Lee is calm-but the work of preparation goes on night and day. April 28 We have rumors of an important cabinet meeting, wherein it was resolved to advise or command Gen. Johnston to evacuate Yorktown and retire toward Richmond! Also that Norfolk is to be given up! I don't believe it; Lee's name is not mentioned. April 29 Major Griswold is here, and so is a new batch of Marylanders. April 30 Troops from the South are coming in and marching down the Peninsula.
April 18th (search for this): chapter 14
al of the publishers have confessed a fear of having their offices closed, if they dare to speak the sentiments struggling for utterance. It is, indeed, a reign of terror! Every Virginian, and other loyal citizens of the Southmembers of Congress and all-must now, before obtaining Gen. Winder's permission to leave the city for their homes, bow down before the aliens in the Provost Marshal's office, and subscribe to an oath of allegiance, while a file of bayonets are pointed at his back! April 18 The President is thin and haggard; and it has been whispered on the street that he will immediately be baptized and confirmed. I hope so, because it may place a great gulf between him and the descendant of those who crucified the Saviour. Nevertheless, some of his enemies allege that professions of Christianity have sometimes been the premeditated accompaniments of usurpations. It was so with Cromwell and with Richard III. Who does not remember the scene in Shakspeare, where Richard
April 17th (search for this): chapter 14
ne. He is not Secretary of War! said he; he is merely a clerk, an underling, and cannot hold up his head in his humiliating position. He never will be able to hold up his head, sir. April 14 There will soon be hard fighting on the Peninsula. April 15 Gen. Beauregard has written to Gen. Wise, offering him a command in his army, if the government will consent to it. It will not be consented to. April 16 Troops are being concentrated rapidly in Virginia by Gen. Lee. April 17 To-day Congress passed an act providing for the termination of martial law within thirty days after the meeting of the next session. This was as far as they could venture; for, indeed, a majority seem to be intimidated at the glitter of bayonets in the streets, wielded by the authority of martial law. The press, too, has taken the alarm, and several of the publishers have confessed a fear of having their offices closed, if they dare to speak the sentiments struggling for utterance. It
April 16th (search for this): chapter 14
n. There is no Secretary of War I said he. What is Randolph? asked one. He is not Secretary of War! said he; he is merely a clerk, an underling, and cannot hold up his head in his humiliating position. He never will be able to hold up his head, sir. April 14 There will soon be hard fighting on the Peninsula. April 15 Gen. Beauregard has written to Gen. Wise, offering him a command in his army, if the government will consent to it. It will not be consented to. April 16 Troops are being concentrated rapidly in Virginia by Gen. Lee. April 17 To-day Congress passed an act providing for the termination of martial law within thirty days after the meeting of the next session. This was as far as they could venture; for, indeed, a majority seem to be intimidated at the glitter of bayonets in the streets, wielded by the authority of martial law. The press, too, has taken the alarm, and several of the publishers have confessed a fear of having their offic
April 15th (search for this): chapter 14
was no brigade for him. Returning from thence, some of his officers, who had escaped the trap at Roanoke, crowded round him to learn the issue of his application. There is no Secretary of War I said he. What is Randolph? asked one. He is not Secretary of War! said he; he is merely a clerk, an underling, and cannot hold up his head in his humiliating position. He never will be able to hold up his head, sir. April 14 There will soon be hard fighting on the Peninsula. April 15 Gen. Beauregard has written to Gen. Wise, offering him a command in his army, if the government will consent to it. It will not be consented to. April 16 Troops are being concentrated rapidly in Virginia by Gen. Lee. April 17 To-day Congress passed an act providing for the termination of martial law within thirty days after the meeting of the next session. This was as far as they could venture; for, indeed, a majority seem to be intimidated at the glitter of bayonets in the
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