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Jonathan H. Morgan (search for this): chapter 17
ing in the city to attend their suffering relations, and to recover the remains of those who were slain. July 7 Gen. Huger has been relieved of his command. He retains his rank and pay as major-general of ordnance. Gen. Pope, Yankee, has been assigned to the command of the army of invasion in Northern Virginia, and Gen. Halleck has been made commanding general, to reside in Washington. Good! The Yankees are disgracing McClellan, the best general they have. July 8 Glorious Col. Morgan has dashed into Kentucky, whipped everything before him, and got off unharmed. He had but little over a thousand men, and captured that number of prisoners. Kentucky will rise in a few weeks. July 9 Lee has turned the tide, and I shall not be surprised if we have a long career of successes. Bragg, and Kirby Smith, and Loring are in motion at last, and Tennessee and Kentucky, and perhaps Missouri, will rise again in Rebellion. July 10 -I forgot to note in its place a feat of
Robert Ould (search for this): chapter 17
Xvi. July, 1862 Terrific fighting. anxiety to visit the battle-field. Lee prepares for other battles. hope for the Union extinct. Gen. Lee brings forward conscripts. Gen. Cobb appointed to arrange exchange of prisoners. Mr. Ould as agent. Pope, the braggart, comes upon the stage. meets a braggart's fate. the war transferred to Northern Virginia. July 1 To-day Gen. Magruder led his division into action at Malvern Hill, it is said, contrary to the judgment of other commaing the war of 1812, and all men taken hereafter will be released on parole within ten days after their capture. We have some 8000 prisoners in this city, and altogether, I dare say, a larger number than the enemy have of our men. July 12 Mr. Ould has been appointed agent to effect exchanges of paroled men. He is also acting as judge advocate. July 13 We have some of Gen. Pope's proclamations and orders. He is simply a braggart, and will meet a braggart's fate. He announces his pu
y the detectives, Winder being ignorant. July 25 More Northern papers received to-day, containing news from the South. Most fortunately, they can know nothing reliable of what is passing within Gen. Lee's lines. The responsibility of keeping his gates closed against spies rests in a great measure on myself, and I endeavor to keep even our own people in profound ignorance of what transpires there. July 26 There is a pause in the depreciation of C. S. securities. July 27 Gen. Lovell, it is said, will be tried by a courtmartial. The same has been said of Generals Magruder and Huger. But I doubt it. July 28 The Examining Board of Surgeons, established by the Secretary of War, has been abolished by order of Gen. Lee. It was the only idea of the Secretary yet developed, excepting the handing over of the whole business of passports to Gen. Winder. July 29 Pope's army, greatly reinforced, are committing shocking devastations in Culpepper and Orange Counties.
ttles in the Valley. But history will do him justice. [My chronicles are designed to assist history, and to supply the smaller incidents and details which the grand historian would be likely to omit.] July 1 Ith.-Gen. Howell Cobb has been sent down the river under flag of truce to negotiate a cartel with Gen. I)ix for the exchange of prisoners. It was decided that the exchange should be conducted on the basis agreed to between the United States and the British Government during the war of 1812, and all men taken hereafter will be released on parole within ten days after their capture. We have some 8000 prisoners in this city, and altogether, I dare say, a larger number than the enemy have of our men. July 12 Mr. Ould has been appointed agent to effect exchanges of paroled men. He is also acting as judge advocate. July 13 We have some of Gen. Pope's proclamations and orders. He is simply a braggart, and will meet a braggart's fate. He announces his purpose to subsist
July, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 17
Xvi. July, 1862 Terrific fighting. anxiety to visit the battle-field. Lee prepares for other battles. hope for the Union extinct. Gen. Lee brings forward conscripts. Gen. Cobb appointed to arrange exchange of prisoners. Mr. Ould as agent. Pope, the braggart, comes upon the stage. meets a braggart's fate. the war transferred to Northern Virginia. July 1 To-day Gen. Magruder led his division into action at Malvern Hill, it is said, contrary to the judgment of other commanders. The enemy's batteries commanded all the approaches in most advantageous position, and fearful was the slaughter. A wounded soldier, fresh from the field to-night, informs me that our loss in killed in this engagement will amount to as many as have fallen in all the others combined. July 2 More fighting to-day. The enemy, although their batteries were successfully defended last night at Malvern Hill, abandoned many guns after the charges ceased, and retreated hastily. The grand a
ey are sold by the detectives, Winder being ignorant. July 25 More Northern papers received to-day, containing news from the South. Most fortunately, they can know nothing reliable of what is passing within Gen. Lee's lines. The responsibility of keeping his gates closed against spies rests in a great measure on myself, and I endeavor to keep even our own people in profound ignorance of what transpires there. July 26 There is a pause in the depreciation of C. S. securities. July 27 Gen. Lovell, it is said, will be tried by a courtmartial. The same has been said of Generals Magruder and Huger. But I doubt it. July 28 The Examining Board of Surgeons, established by the Secretary of War, has been abolished by order of Gen. Lee. It was the only idea of the Secretary yet developed, excepting the handing over of the whole business of passports to Gen. Winder. July 29 Pope's army, greatly reinforced, are committing shocking devastations in Culpepper and Ora
the same papers the passports given them by Gen. Winder. I doubt not they are sold by the detectives, Winder being ignorant. July 25 More Northern papers received to-day, containing news from the South. Most fortunately, they can know nothing reliable of what is passing within Gen. Lee's lines. The responsibility of keeping his gates closed against spies rests in a great measure on myself, and I endeavor to keep even our own people in profound ignorance of what transpires there. July 26 There is a pause in the depreciation of C. S. securities. July 27 Gen. Lovell, it is said, will be tried by a courtmartial. The same has been said of Generals Magruder and Huger. But I doubt it. July 28 The Examining Board of Surgeons, established by the Secretary of War, has been abolished by order of Gen. Lee. It was the only idea of the Secretary yet developed, excepting the handing over of the whole business of passports to Gen. Winder. July 29 Pope's army, great
ed by Brig.-Gen. Winder. Respectfully, Geo. W. Randolph, Secretary of War. July 24 Already the flood-gates of treasonable intelligence flowing North seem to be thrown wide open. The Baltimore papers contain a vast amount of information concerning our condition, movements in progress, and projected enterprises. And to crown all, these rascals publish in the same papers the passports given them by Gen. Winder. I doubt not they are sold by the detectives, Winder being ignorant. July 25 More Northern papers received to-day, containing news from the South. Most fortunately, they can know nothing reliable of what is passing within Gen. Lee's lines. The responsibility of keeping his gates closed against spies rests in a great measure on myself, and I endeavor to keep even our own people in profound ignorance of what transpires there. July 26 There is a pause in the depreciation of C. S. securities. July 27 Gen. Lovell, it is said, will be tried by a courtmart
ore passports to Petersburg where he was military commander, that city being likewise under martial law. I simply uttered a defiance, and he departed, boiling over with rage. July 23 To-day I received the following note from the Secretary: July 23D, 1862. J. B. Jones, Esq. Sir :--You will not issue passports except to persons going to the camps near — Richmond. Passports elsewhere will be granted by Brig.-Gen. Winder. Respectfully, Geo. W. Randolph, Secretary of War. July 24 Already the flood-gates of treasonable intelligence flowing North seem to be thrown wide open. The Baltimore papers contain a vast amount of information concerning our condition, movements in progress, and projected enterprises. And to crown all, these rascals publish in the same papers the passports given them by Gen. Winder. I doubt not they are sold by the detectives, Winder being ignorant. July 25 More Northern papers received to-day, containing news from the South. Most for
of passports to Gen. Winder. July 29 Pope's army, greatly reinforced, are committing shocking devastations in Culpepper and Orange Counties. His brutal orders, and his bragging proclamations, have wrought our men to such a pitch of exasperation that, when the day of battle comes, there will be, must be terrible slaughter. July 30 Both Gen. Jackson and Gen. Stuart were in the department to-day. Their commands have preceded them, and must be near Orange C. H. by this time. These war-worn heroes (neither of them over forty years of age) attracted much attention. Everybody wished to see them; and if they had lingered a few minutes longer in the hall, a crowd would have collected, cheering to the echo. This they avoided, transacting their business in the shortest possible space of time, and then escaping observation. They have yet much work to do. July 31 Gen. Breckinridge has beaten the Yankees at Baton Rouge, but without result, as we have no co-operating fleet.
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