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ecretary of War, has been abolished by order of Gen. Lee. It was the only idea of the Secretary yet developed, excepting the handing over of the whole business of passports to Gen. Winder. July 29 Pope's army, greatly reinforced, are committing shocking devastations in Culpepper and Orange Counties. His brutal orders, and his bragging proclamations, have wrought our men to such a pitch of exasperation that, when the day of battle comes, there will be, must be terrible slaughter. July 30 Both Gen. Jackson and Gen. Stuart were in the department to-day. Their commands have preceded them, and must be near Orange C. H. by this time. These war-worn heroes (neither of them over forty years of age) attracted much attention. Everybody wished to see them; and if they had lingered a few minutes longer in the hall, a crowd would have collected, cheering to the echo. This they avoided, transacting their business in the shortest possible space of time, and then escaping observati
transpires there. July 26 There is a pause in the depreciation of C. S. securities. July 27 Gen. Lovell, it is said, will be tried by a courtmartial. The same has been said of Generals Magruder and Huger. But I doubt it. July 28 The Examining Board of Surgeons, established by the Secretary of War, has been abolished by order of Gen. Lee. It was the only idea of the Secretary yet developed, excepting the handing over of the whole business of passports to Gen. Winder. July 29 Pope's army, greatly reinforced, are committing shocking devastations in Culpepper and Orange Counties. His brutal orders, and his bragging proclamations, have wrought our men to such a pitch of exasperation that, when the day of battle comes, there will be, must be terrible slaughter. July 30 Both Gen. Jackson and Gen. Stuart were in the department to-day. Their commands have preceded them, and must be near Orange C. H. by this time. These war-worn heroes (neither of them over
ortunately, they can know nothing reliable of what is passing within Gen. Lee's lines. The responsibility of keeping his gates closed against spies rests in a great measure on myself, and I endeavor to keep even our own people in profound ignorance of what transpires there. July 26 There is a pause in the depreciation of C. S. securities. July 27 Gen. Lovell, it is said, will be tried by a courtmartial. The same has been said of Generals Magruder and Huger. But I doubt it. July 28 The Examining Board of Surgeons, established by the Secretary of War, has been abolished by order of Gen. Lee. It was the only idea of the Secretary yet developed, excepting the handing over of the whole business of passports to Gen. Winder. July 29 Pope's army, greatly reinforced, are committing shocking devastations in Culpepper and Orange Counties. His brutal orders, and his bragging proclamations, have wrought our men to such a pitch of exasperation that, when the day of bat
and the Secretary signed it as follows: Richmond, July 18th, 1862. Brig.-Gen. J. H. Winder. Sir :--The passports issued by J. B. Jones from this Department to pass the lines of the Confederate armies, and the lines of the Confederate States, are granted by my direction, evidences of which are on file in the Passport Office. Respectfully, G. W. Randolph, Secretary of War. This, one of the ladies delivered to him. I hope I am now done with Gen. Winder and his Plug Ugly dynasty. July 19 This morning early, while congratulating myself on the evidence of some firmness and independence in the new Secretary, I received the following note: Richmond, July 19th, 1862. Mr. J. B. Jones. Sir :--I have just been directed by the Secretary of War that he has turned over the whole business of passports to Gen. Winder, and that applications for passports will not be received at this office at all. Very respectfully, A. G. Bledsoe, Asst. Sec. War. Of course I ceased opera
nscripts, and pays very little attention to McClellan on the Peninsula, knowing no further enterprises will be attempted by the enemy in that quarter for some time to come. July 17 The people are too jubilant, I fear, over our recent successes near the city. A great many skulkers from the army are seen daily in the streets, and it is said there are 3000 men here subject to conscript duty, who have not been enrolled. The business of purchasing substitutes is prevailing alarmingly. July 18 To-day several ladies applied in person to the Secretary of War for passports to Norfolk and Baltimore, and he sent me written orders to grant them. They next applied to Gen. Winder to go with the flag of truce, exhibiting their passports. He repudiated them, however, and sent the ladies back to me, saying he wanted something with the Secretary's signature, showing me to be authorized to sign them. I wrote such a note as I supposed he wanted, and the Secretary signed it as follows: R
July 23rd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 17
a passion with a passport in his hand which I had given, a week before, to Mr. Collier, of Petersburg, on the order of the Assistant Secretary of War-threatening me with vengeance and the terrors of Castle Godwin, his Bastile if I granted any more passports to Petersburg where he was military commander, that city being likewise under martial law. I simply uttered a defiance, and he departed, boiling over with rage. July 23 To-day I received the following note from the Secretary: July 23D, 1862. J. B. Jones, Esq. Sir :--You will not issue passports except to persons going to the camps near — Richmond. Passports elsewhere will be granted by Brig.-Gen. Winder. Respectfully, Geo. W. Randolph, Secretary of War. July 24 Already the flood-gates of treasonable intelligence flowing North seem to be thrown wide open. The Baltimore papers contain a vast amount of information concerning our condition, movements in progress, and projected enterprises. And to crown all,
ut we fired too high in the dark, and did but little execution. Our shells fell beyond the enemy's camp on the opposite side of the river. We lost a few men, by accident, mostly. But hereafter in each bush they fear an officer. July 16 Gen. Lee is hurrying up reinforcements from the South, old regiments and conscripts, and pays very little attention to McClellan on the Peninsula, knowing no further enterprises will be attempted by the enemy in that quarter for some time to come. July 17 The people are too jubilant, I fear, over our recent successes near the city. A great many skulkers from the army are seen daily in the streets, and it is said there are 3000 men here subject to conscript duty, who have not been enrolled. The business of purchasing substitutes is prevailing alarmingly. July 18 To-day several ladies applied in person to the Secretary of War for passports to Norfolk and Baltimore, and he sent me written orders to grant them. They next applied to G
river was filled with gun-boats and transports. At a signal, all the guns were fired, at short range, too, for some minutes with great rapidity, and then the batteries were withdrawn. I happened to be awake, and could not conjecture what the rumpus meant. But we fired too high in the dark, and did but little execution. Our shells fell beyond the enemy's camp on the opposite side of the river. We lost a few men, by accident, mostly. But hereafter in each bush they fear an officer. July 16 Gen. Lee is hurrying up reinforcements from the South, old regiments and conscripts, and pays very little attention to McClellan on the Peninsula, knowing no further enterprises will be attempted by the enemy in that quarter for some time to come. July 17 The people are too jubilant, I fear, over our recent successes near the city. A great many skulkers from the army are seen daily in the streets, and it is said there are 3000 men here subject to conscript duty, who have not been
July 18th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 17
veral ladies applied in person to the Secretary of War for passports to Norfolk and Baltimore, and he sent me written orders to grant them. They next applied to Gen. Winder to go with the flag of truce, exhibiting their passports. He repudiated them, however, and sent the ladies back to me, saying he wanted something with the Secretary's signature, showing me to be authorized to sign them. I wrote such a note as I supposed he wanted, and the Secretary signed it as follows: Richmond, July 18th, 1862. Brig.-Gen. J. H. Winder. Sir :--The passports issued by J. B. Jones from this Department to pass the lines of the Confederate armies, and the lines of the Confederate States, are granted by my direction, evidences of which are on file in the Passport Office. Respectfully, G. W. Randolph, Secretary of War. This, one of the ladies delivered to him. I hope I am now done with Gen. Winder and his Plug Ugly dynasty. July 19 This morning early, while congratulating myself on
ithin his lines. July 22 To-day Gen. Winder came into my office in a passion with a passport in his hand which I had given, a week before, to Mr. Collier, of Petersburg, on the order of the Assistant Secretary of War-threatening me with vengeance and the terrors of Castle Godwin, his Bastile if I granted any more passports to Petersburg where he was military commander, that city being likewise under martial law. I simply uttered a defiance, and he departed, boiling over with rage. July 23 To-day I received the following note from the Secretary: July 23D, 1862. J. B. Jones, Esq. Sir :--You will not issue passports except to persons going to the camps near — Richmond. Passports elsewhere will be granted by Brig.-Gen. Winder. Respectfully, Geo. W. Randolph, Secretary of War. July 24 Already the flood-gates of treasonable intelligence flowing North seem to be thrown wide open. The Baltimore papers contain a vast amount of information concerning our condit
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