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nerals-Lee and his son (the one just returned from captivity), Longstreet, Whiting, Wise, Hoke, Morgan (he was ordered by Gen. Cooper to desist from his enterprise in the West), Evans, and many others. Some fourteen attended St. Paul's (Episcopal) Church yesterday, where the President worships. Doubtless they are in consultation on the pressing needs of the country. About noon to-day a dispatch came from Lieut.-Col. Cole, Gen. Lee's principal commissary, at Orange Court House, dated 12th inst., saying the army was out of meat, and had but one day's rations of bread. This I placed in the hands of the Secretary myself, and he seemed roused by it. Half an hour after, I saw Col. Northrop coming out of the department with a pale face, and triumphant, compressed lips. He had indorsed on the dispatch, before it came — it was addressed to him — that the state of things had come which he had long and often predicted, and to avert which he had repeatedly suggested the remedy; but the Sec
sleep, to carrying one. At night he will sit by a fire in the field. Some of the clerks would shoot Mr. Memminger cheerfully. He will not pay them their salaries, on some trivial informality in the certificates; and while they are fighting and bleeding in his defense, their wives and children are threatened to be turned out of doors by the boarding-house keepers. March 4 Bright and frosty in the morning; warm and cloudy in the afternoon. The enemy have disappeared. On the 17th inst., Gen. Lee wrote the Secretary of War that he had received a letter from Gen. Longstreet, asking that Pickett's Division be in readiness to join him; also that a brigade of Gen. Buckner's Division, at Dalton, be sent him at once. He says the force immediately in front of him consists of the 4th, 11th, 9th, and 23d corps, besides a large body of cavalry from Middle Tennessee. Gen. Lee says the railroad from Chattanooga to Knoxville, being about completed, will enable the enemy to combine o
raiders. General Butler on the Eastern Shore. colonel Dahlgren's body. destitution of the army. strength of the Southwestern army. destitution of my family. protest from South Carolina. difficulty with P. Milmo & Co. Hon. J. W. Wall. March 1 Dark and raining. As the morning progressed, the city was a little startled by the sound of artillery in a northern direction, and not very distant. Couriers and horsemen from the country announced the approach of the enemy within the ouvision.-J. D. I hope it will be revised, and nine-tenths of its officers put in the army as conscripts. Raining this morning, and alternate clouds and sunshine during the day. One of the clerks who was in the engagement, Tuesday night, March 1st, informed me that the enemy's cavalry approached slowly up the hill, on the crest of which the battalion was lying. At the word, the boys rose and fired on their knees. He says the enemy delivered a volley before they retreated, killing two o
dent's indorsement, etc. as unfounded and injurious, etc. The President indorses this letter as follows: Unless this letter is designed to ask whether Col. M. is still in the army, or discharged by the appointment of a successor, I find nothing which changes the case since my indorsement referred to, as causing resentment and calling for vindication. Your orders were certainly official communications. Not having seen them, I can express no opinion upon their terms.-Jefferson Davis. March 2 A slight snow on the ground this morning-but bright and cool. Last night, after I had retired to bed, we heard a brisk cannonading, and volleys of musketry, a few miles distant. This morning an excitement, but no alarm, pervaded the city. It was certainly a formidable attempt to take the city by surprise. From the number of disgraceful failures heretofore, the last very recently, the enemy must have come to the desperate resolution to storm the city this time at all hazards. And
he damage done by the enemy to the railroads, etc. etc. I hope it was not a consultation upon any presumed necessity of the abandonment of the city! We were paid to-day in $5 bills. I gave $20 for half a cord of wood, and $60 for a bushel of common white cornfield beans. Bacon is yet $8 per pound; but more is coming to the city than usual, and a decline may be looked for, I hope. The farmers above tne city, who have been hoarding grain, meat, etc., will lose much by the raiders. March 3 Bright and frosty. Confused accounts of the raid in the morning papers. During the day it was reported that Col. Johnson's forces had been cut up this morning by superior numbers, and that Butler was advancing up the Peninsula with 15,000 men. The tocsin was sounded in the afternoon, and the militia called out; every available man being summoned to the field for the defense of the city. The opinion prevails that the plan to liberate the prisoners and capture Richmond is not fully d
ated this, said it was right and proper for him to go-even without orders. He goes without a blanket, preferring not to sleep, to carrying one. At night he will sit by a fire in the field. Some of the clerks would shoot Mr. Memminger cheerfully. He will not pay them their salaries, on some trivial informality in the certificates; and while they are fighting and bleeding in his defense, their wives and children are threatened to be turned out of doors by the boarding-house keepers. March 4 Bright and frosty in the morning; warm and cloudy in the afternoon. The enemy have disappeared. On the 17th inst., Gen. Lee wrote the Secretary of War that he had received a letter from Gen. Longstreet, asking that Pickett's Division be in readiness to join him; also that a brigade of Gen. Buckner's Division, at Dalton, be sent him at once. He says the force immediately in front of him consists of the 4th, 11th, 9th, and 23d corps, besides a large body of cavalry from Middle Tenne
desired, and its place filled with troops from South Carolina, etc., where operations will probably soon cease. The Secretary sent this to the President. The President sent it back to day, indorsed, How can Pickett's division be replaced?-J. D. Henly's Battalion returned this evening; and Custis can resume his school, unless he should be among the list doomed to the rank in the field, for which he is physically incapable, as Surgeon Garnett, the President's physician, has certified. March 5 Clear and pleasant, after a slight shower in the morning. The raid is considered at an end, and it has ended disastrously for the invaders. Some extraordinary memoranda were captured from the raiders, showing a diabolical purpose, and creating a profound sensation here. The cabinet have been in consultation many hours in regard to it, and I have reason to believe it is the present purpose ta deal summarily with the captives taken with Dahlgren, but the sober second thought will
Lee's army. He has abundance in Georgia and South Carolina, but cannot get transportation. He says the last barrel of flour from Lynchburg has gone to the army. We have news from the West that Morgan and his men will be in the saddle in a few days. After all, Mr. Lyon's house was not touched by any of the enemy's shells. But one shell struck within 300 yards of one house in Clay Street, and not even the women and children were alarmed. The price of a turkey to-day is $60. March 6 My birthday-55. Bright and frosty; subsequently warm and pleasant; No news. But some indignation in the streets at the Adjutant-General's (Cooper) order, removing the clerks and putting them in the army, just when they had, by their valor, saved the capital from flames and the throats of the President and his cabinet from the knives of the enemy. If the order be executed, the heads of the government will receive and merit execration. It won't be done. March 7 Bright and frosty
key to-day is $60. March 6 My birthday-55. Bright and frosty; subsequently warm and pleasant; No news. But some indignation in the streets at the Adjutant-General's (Cooper) order, removing the clerks and putting them in the army, just when they had, by their valor, saved the capital from flames and the throats of the President and his cabinet from the knives of the enemy. If the order be executed, the heads of the government will receive and merit execration. It won't be done. March 7 Bright and frosty morning; cloudy and warm in the evening. Cannon and musketry were heard this morning some miles northwest of the city. Probably Gen. Hampton fell in with one of the lost detachments of the raiders, seeking a way of escape. This attempt to surprise Richmond was a disgraceful failure. The Secretary of War has gone up to his farm for a few days to see the extent of injury done him by the enemy. Mr. Benjamin and Assistant Secretary Campbell are already allowing m
disgraceful failure. The Secretary of War has gone up to his farm for a few days to see the extent of injury done him by the enemy. Mr. Benjamin and Assistant Secretary Campbell are already allowing men to pass to the United States, and even directly to Washington. Surely the injury done us by information thus conveyed to the enemy hitherto, ought to be a sufficient warning. Gen. Bragg has resolved to keep a body of 1500 cavalry permanently within the city and its vicinity. March 8 An application of Capt. C. B. Duffield, for a lieutenant-colonelcy, recommended by Col. Preston, came back from the President to-day. It was favorably indorsed by the Secretary, but Gen. Cooper marked it adversely, saying the Assistant Adjutant-General should not execute the Conscription act, and finally, the President simply said, The whole organization requires revision.-J. D. I hope it will be revised, and nine-tenths of its officers put in the army as conscripts. Raining this m
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