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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
A short time since, it was said, Johnston was prevented from advancing for want of rations. April 25 A bright and beautiful day; southern breezes. No reliable war news; but there are rumors that our victory at Shreveport was a great one. Nothing additional from North Carolina, though something further must soon occur there. It is said the enemy's killed and wounded at Plymouth amounted to only 100: ours 300; but we got 2500 prisoners. President Lincoln has made a speech at Baltimore, threatening retaliation for the slaughter at Fort Pillow--which was stormed. Lieut.-Gen. Polk telegraphs that our forces have captured and burnt one of the enemy's gun-boats at Yazoo City-first taking out her guns, eight rifled 24-pounders. To-day Mr. Memminger, in behalf of the ladies in his department, presented a battle-flag to the Department Battalion for its gallant conduct in the repulse of Dahlgren's raid. But the ladies leave early in the morning for South Carolina. T
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
in the afternoon. This is the anniversary of the first gun of the war, fired at Fort Sumter. It is still said and believed that Gen. Lee will take the initiative, and attack Grant. The following shows that we have had another success: Mobile, April 11th, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper, A. & I. General. The following report was received at Baton Rouge, on the 3d inst., from the Surgeon-General of Banks's army: We met the enemy near Shreveport. Union force repulsed with great loss. How many can you accommodate in hospitals at Baton Rouge? Steamer Essex, or Benton, destroyed by torpedoes in Red River, and a transport captured by Confederates. Farragut reported preparing to attack Mobile. Six monitors coming to him. The garrisons of New Orleans and Baton Rouge were very much reduced for the purpose of increasing Banks's forces. D. H. Maury, Major-General Commanding. April 13 A clear, but cool day. Again planted corn, the other having rotted. There is an unoff
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
then this famine would not have been upon us, and there would have been abundance of grain in the army depots of Virginia. April 30 Federal papers now admit that Gen. Banks has been disastrously beaten in Louisiana. They also admit their calamity at Plymouth, N. C. Thus in Louisiana, Florida, West Tennessee, and North Carolina the enemy have sustained severe defeats: their losses amounting to some 20,000 men, 100 guns, half a dozen war steamers, etc. etc. Gen. Burnside has left Annapolis and gone to Grant-whatever the plan was originally; and the work of concentration goes on for a decisive clash of arms in Virginia. And troops are coming hither from all quarters, like streamlets flowing into the ocean. Our men are confident, and eager for the fray. The railroad companies say they can transport 10,000 bushels corn, daily, into Virginia. That will subsist 200,000 men and 25,000 horses. And in June the Piedmont connection will be completed. The great battle ma
Grant Run (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
t has already some 10,000,000 pounds of bacon in Alabama; and that if the other States, east of the Mississippi, furnish a proportional amount, there will be 60,000,000 pounds-enough to feed our armies twelve months. The Commissary-General's estimates for the next six months are for 400,000 men. April 23 A bright day, with southern breezes. It is rumored and believed that Gen. Lee's army is in motion. If this be so, we shall Soon hear of a fight, or a foot race. And how can Grant run away, when Mr. Chase, the Federal Secretary of the Treasury, openly proclaims ruin to the finances unless they speedily achieve success in the field? I think he must fight; and I am sure he will be beaten, for Lee's strength is probably underestimated. We are also looking to hear more news from North Carolina; and Newbern will probably be stormed next, since storming is now the order of the day. April 24 Cloudy and windy, but warm. We have none of the details yet of the stor
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
it. From this it seems that the Secretary is not only not to be gratified by the appointment, but is really kept in ignorance of army movements in contemplation! Major Griswold has resigned, at last. He did not find his position a bed of roses. I believe he abandons the Confederate States service altogether, and will attend to the collection of claims, and the defense of prisoners, probably arrested by Major Carrington, his successor in office. To-day I saw two conscripts from Western Virginia conducted to the cars (going to Lee's army) in chains. It made a chill shoot through my breast. I doubt its policy, though they may be peculiar offenders. The benevolent Capt. Warner, being persecuted by the Commissary-General for telling the truth in regard to the rations, etc., is settling his accounts as rapidly as possible, and will resign his office. He says he will resume his old business, publishing books, etc. April 11 Rained all night, but clear most of the day.
Baton Rouge (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
t. The following shows that we have had another success: Mobile, April 11th, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper, A. & I. General. The following report was received at Baton Rouge, on the 3d inst., from the Surgeon-General of Banks's army: We met the enemy near Shreveport. Union force repulsed with great loss. How many can you accommodate in hospitals at Baton Rouge? Steamer Essex, or Benton, destroyed by torpedoes in Red River, and a transport captured by Confederates. Farragut reported preparing to attack Mobile. Six monitors coming to him. The garrisons of New Orleans and Baton Rouge were very much reduced for the purpose of increasing Banks's forces. Baton Rouge were very much reduced for the purpose of increasing Banks's forces. D. H. Maury, Major-General Commanding. April 13 A clear, but cool day. Again planted corn, the other having rotted. There is an unofficial report that one of our torpedo boats struck the Federal war steamer Minnesota yesterday, near Newport News, and damaged her badly. I learn (from an official source) to-day that
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ms ruin to the finances unless they speedily achieve success in the field? I think he must fight; and I am sure he will be beaten, for Lee's strength is probably underestimated. We are also looking to hear more news from North Carolina; and Newbern will probably be stormed next, since storming is now the order of the day. April 24 Cloudy and windy, but warm. We have none of the details yet of the storming of Plymouth, except the brief dispatches in the newspapers; nor any reliabuld be cheap at that price! April 29 A letter from Major-Gen. Hoke, dated Plymouth, April 25th, and asking the appointment of Lieut.-Col. Dearing to a brigadiership, says his promotion is desired to lead a brigade in the expedition against Newbern. The President directs the Secretary to appoint him temporarily for the expedition. Soon we shall know the result. By flag of truce boat, it is understood Northern papers admit a Federal defeat on the Red River, the storming of Plymouth, e
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ment of the capital; and many of our people will regard it as a preliminary to the evacuation of Richmond. It is more the effect of extortion and high prices, than apprehension of the city being taken by the enemy. April 20 A clear morning, but a cold, cloudy day. The following dispatch from Gen. Forrest shows that the bloody work has commenced in earnest: Demopolis, Ala., April 19th. to Gen. S. Cooper. The following dispatch has just been received from Gen. Forrest, dated Jackson, Tenn., April 15th. L. Polk, Lieut.-General. I attacked Fort Pillow on the morning of the 12th inst., with a part of Bell's and McCulloch's brigades, numbering--, under Brig.-Gen. J. R. Chalmers. After a short fight we drove the enemy, seven hundred strong, into the fort, under cover of their gun-boats, and demanded a surrender, which was declined by Major L. W. Booth, commanding United States forces. I stormed the fort, and after a contest of thirty minutes captured the entire garriso
Yazoo City (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
e rumors that our victory at Shreveport was a great one. Nothing additional from North Carolina, though something further must soon occur there. It is said the enemy's killed and wounded at Plymouth amounted to only 100: ours 300; but we got 2500 prisoners. President Lincoln has made a speech at Baltimore, threatening retaliation for the slaughter at Fort Pillow--which was stormed. Lieut.-Gen. Polk telegraphs that our forces have captured and burnt one of the enemy's gun-boats at Yazoo City-first taking out her guns, eight rifled 24-pounders. To-day Mr. Memminger, in behalf of the ladies in his department, presented a battle-flag to the Department Battalion for its gallant conduct in the repulse of Dahlgren's raid. But the ladies leave early in the morning for South Carolina. The President still says that many of the government officers and employees must be sent away, if transportation cannot be had to feed them here as well as the armies. April 26 Another tru
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
umor that the non combating population will be required to leave, to avoid transportation of food to the city. Corn is selling at $1.25 per bushel in Georgia and Alabama; here, at $40-such is the deplorable condition of the railroads, or rather of the management of them. Col. Northrop, Commissary-General, said to-day that Gen. Lelanted by an excitement of another kind. A report was circulated and believed that the President resolved yesterday to remove the government to South Carolina or Alabama; and the commotion was very great. The President's salary is insufficient to meet his housekeeping expenditures; and Mrs. D. has become, very naturally, somewhatre making unnecessary impressments, leaving to each negro only four ounces of bacon per day. He says the government has already some 10,000,000 pounds of bacon in Alabama; and that if the other States, east of the Mississippi, furnish a proportional amount, there will be 60,000,000 pounds-enough to feed our armies twelve months.
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