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III. June, 1861 Troops pour into Richmond. beginning of hostilities. Gen. Lee made a full general. Major Gen. Polk. a battle expected at Manassas. June 1 In the absence of the Secretary, I arranged the furniture as well as I could, and took possession of the five offices I had selected. But no business, of con myself to be cicerone to the stranger. He was very grateful,--for a long time. Col. B. had graduated at West Point in the same class with the President and Bishop Polk, and subsequently, after following various pursuits, being once, I believe, a preacher, became settled as a teacher of mathematics at the University of Virginiawho has been whispering with Col. Bledsoe several times during the last week, attracted my attention to-day. And when he retired, Colonel B. informed me it was Bishop Polk, a classmate of his and the President's at West Point. He had just been appointed a major-general, and assigned to duty in the West, where he would rank Gen. P
Robert Tyler (search for this): chapter 4
the Carleton House. June 3 The Secretary arrived to-day, sick; and was accompanied by Major Tyler, himself unwell. And troops are beginning to arrive in considerable numbers. The precincts ry had a partiality for full letters, especially when addressing any of his friends; and that Major Tyler, who had returned, and was then sitting with the Secretary, rarely dismissed one from his pengain immediately, saying the Secretary was busy. He left the letters, however. Presently Major Tyler came out of the Secretary's room with several voluminous letters in his own handwriting, dulyhout delay, for military reasons. About this time the Secretary's health gave way again, and Major Tyler had another fit of indisposition totally disqualifying him for business. Hence I have nearly June 22 The Convention has appointed ten additional members to the Provisional Congress-President Tyler among them. It will be observed that my Diary goes on, including every day. Fighting for o
Sydney Johnston (search for this): chapter 4
hundred. That road to Richmond is a hard one to travel! But I learn there is a panic about Williamsburg. Several young men from that vicinity have shouldered their pens and are applying for clerkships in the departments. But most of the men of proper age in the literary institutions are volunteering in defense of their native land. June 12 Gen. Lee has been or is to be created a full general in the Confederate army, and will be assigned to duty here. He is third on the list, Sydney Johnston being second. From all I can see and infer, we shall make no attempt this year to invade the enemy's country. Our policy is to be defensive, and it will be severely criticised, for a vast majority of our people are for carrying the war into Africa without a moment's delay. The sequel will show which is right, the government or the people. At all events, the government will rule. June 13 Only one of the Williamsburg volunteers came into the department proper; and he will make h
Potterfield (search for this): chapter 4
oon occur, if the enemy, now in overwhelming numbers, should advance. The Northern papers say the Yankee army will celebrate the 4th of July in Richmond. Nous verrons. But no doubt hostilities have commenced. We have accounts of frightful massacres in Missouri, by German mercenaries. Hampton has been occupied by the enemy, a detachment having been sent from Fortress Monroe for that purpose. They also hold Newport News on the Peninsula! There are rumors of a fight at Philippi. One Col. Potterfield was surprised. If this be so, there is no excuse for him. I think the President will make short work of incompetent commanders. Now a blunder is worse than a crime. June 4 The Secretary is still sick. Having nothing better to do, and seeing that eight-tenths of the letters received are merely applications for commissions in the regular army — an organization without men-and none being granted from civil life, I employed myself writing certain articles for the press, hoping by th
To-day the Secretary refused to sign the colonel's letters, telling him to sign them himself-by order of the Secretary of War. June 10 Yesterday the colonel did not take so many letters to answer; and to-day he looked about him for other duties more congenial to his nature. June 11 It is coming in earnest! The supposed thunder, heard down the river yesterday, turns out to have been artillery. A fight has occurred at Bethel, and blood.-Yankee blood-has flowed pretty freely. Magruder was assailed by some five thousand Yankees at Bethel, on the Peninsula. His force was about nine hundred; but he was behind intrenchments. We lost but one man killed and five wounded. The enemy's loss is several hundred. That road to Richmond is a hard one to travel! But I learn there is a panic about Williamsburg. Several young men from that vicinity have shouldered their pens and are applying for clerkships in the departments. But most of the men of proper age in the literary instit
Memminger (search for this): chapter 4
opriety of aggressive movements with his command. All his purposed advances were countermanded. The policy of the government is to be economical of the men. We have but a limited, the enemy an inexhaustible number. June 22 The Convention has appointed ten additional members to the Provisional Congress-President Tyler among them. It will be observed that my Diary goes on, including every day. Fighting for our homes and holy altars, there is no intermission on Sunday. It is true, Mr. Memminger came in the other day with a proposition to cease from labor on Sunday, but our Secretary made war on it. The President, however, goes to church very regularly-St. Paul's. On last Sunday the President surprised me. It was before church time, and I was working alone. No one else was in the large room, and the Secretary himself had gone home, quite ill. I thought I heard some one approaching lightly from behind, but wrote on without looking up; even when he had been standing some time
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 4
re beginning to arrive in considerable numbers. The precincts of the city will soon be a series of encampments. The regiments are drilled here, and these mostly forwarded to Manassas, where a battle must soon occur, if the enemy, now in overwhelming numbers, should advance. The Northern papers say the Yankee army will celebrate the 4th of July in Richmond. Nous verrons. But no doubt hostilities have commenced. We have accounts of frightful massacres in Missouri, by German mercenaries. Hampton has been occupied by the enemy, a detachment having been sent from Fortress Monroe for that purpose. They also hold Newport News on the Peninsula! There are rumors of a fight at Philippi. One Col. Potterfield was surprised. If this be so, there is no excuse for him. I think the President will make short work of incompetent commanders. Now a blunder is worse than a crime. June 4 The Secretary is still sick. Having nothing better to do, and seeing that eight-tenths of the letters r
A. T. Bledsoe (search for this): chapter 4
to duty. I saw at a glance how the land lay. It was Col. A. T. Bledsoe, lately of the University of Virginia; and he had beo room in his office for him. June 8 This morning Col. Bledsoe came in with his letters, some fifty in number, looking. He went to work with hearty good-will. June 14 Col. Bledsoe has given up writing almost entirely, but he groans as appreciated, a thing I never knew. All I know is that Col. Bledsoe has been appointed by the President to fill an importanthe correspondence of the department on my hands, since Col. Bledsoe has ceased to write. June 17 To-day there was a rion and intellectual face, who has been whispering with Col. Bledsoe several times during the last week, attracted my attentne 24 To-day I was startled by the announcement from Col. Bledsoe that he would resign soon, and that it was his purpose l in a good humor. He showed me the two first words: Dear Bledsoe. He said nothing more about resigning. I must get mor
R. E. Lee (search for this): chapter 4
III. June, 1861 Troops pour into Richmond. beginning of hostilities. Gen. Lee made a full general. Major Gen. Polk. a battle expected at Manassas. June 1 In the absence of the Secretary, I arranged the furniture as well as I could, and took possession of the five offices I had selected. But no business, of course, could be done before his arrival. Yet an immense mass of business was accumulatingletters by the hundreds were demanding attention. And I soon found, as th Several young men from that vicinity have shouldered their pens and are applying for clerkships in the departments. But most of the men of proper age in the literary institutions are volunteering in defense of their native land. June 12 Gen. Lee has been or is to be created a full general in the Confederate army, and will be assigned to duty here. He is third on the list, Sydney Johnston being second. From all I can see and infer, we shall make no attempt this year to invade the enemy
here-and will not be known until after-years,--that we have not enough ammunition at Manassas to fight a battle. There are not percussion caps enough in our army for a serious skirmish. It will be obviated in a few weeks; and until then I pray there may be no battle. But if the enemy advance, our brave men will give them the cold steel. We must win the first battle at all hazards, and at any cost; and, after that,--how long after? --we must win the last! June 19 Yesterday I saw Colonel Bartow, still accompanied by young Lamar, his aid. I wish all our officers were inspired by the same zeal and determination that they are. And are they not? June 20 Gov. Wise has been appointed brigadier-general, of a subsequent date to General Floyd's commission. He goes to the West, where laurels grow; but I think it will be difficult to win them by any one acting in a subordinate capacity, and especially by generals appointed from civil life. They are the aversion of the West Pointer
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