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Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
the rear, back to his company in the front. It is rumored that Sheridan has cut the road between Gordonsville and Charlottesville, and between that place and Lynchburg. If this be true, he will probably strike south for the Danville Road. Then we shall have confusion here, and the famine intensified. There seems to be no concgress. It is the anniversary of the battle of Waterloo. If we gain the day, it will end the war. It is now said Gen. Early (with Ewell's corps) has reached Lynchburg, where a battle must occur. Gen. Ewell has been assigned to the command of this department, Gen. Ransom going West. We have advices (4 P. M.) of a terrifious disaster at all events, else there would be consternation in the city, for bad news flies fast, and cannot be kept back. There was fighting yesterday at Lynchburg,--no result known yet. Every Sunday I see how shabby my clothes have become, as every one else, almost, has a good suit in reserve. During the week all are
Wade Hampton (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
, like Indian summer. As I feared; there is trouble with Beauregard. He drew off his troops from in front of Bermuda Hundred to reinforce the fewer regiments at Petersburg, and saved that city, and Gen. Lee had to drive the enemy off again from the abandoned line. It is said Beauregard acted contrary to orders, and has been suspended from command by order of the President. At all events, Lee is at Petersburg. Sheridan's raiders are near the city again, followed and preceded by Wade Hampton and Fitz Lee. Their cannon has been heard all the morning. Mr. Secretary Memminger has resigned. June 21 Clear and warmer. Gen. Beauregard has not been removed from his command,--.it would be too great a shock to popular sentiment. The iron-clads went out this morning and proceeded down the river, supported by Custis Lee's brigade of local troops, including the Departmental Battalion, marching a dozen miles in the sun and dust. More will be on the sick list. June 22
Charleston, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
inridge has only 9000 and the enemy 18,000. Lieut.-Gen Holmes sends from Raleigh, N. C., a letter from Hon. T. Bragg, revealing the existence of a secret organization in communication with the enemy, styled the H. O. A.; and asking authority to arrest certain men supposed to be implicated. A letter was received from G. W. Lay, his son-in-law, by the Assistant Secretary of War, Judge Campbell, dated near Petersburg, stating that the Southern Express Company would bring articles from Charleston for him. That company seems to be more potential than ever. Cannonading was heard far down the Chickahominy this morning. And yet Lieut.-Gen. Ewell marched his corps to-day out the Brooke Road, just in the opposite direction! It is rumored that he is marching away for Washington! If he had transportation, and could march in that direction, no doubt it would be the speediest way of relieving Richmond. Gen. Lee, however, knows best. At the conclave of dignitaries, Hunter, Wigfal
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
non could be distinguished great crashes of musketry, as if whole divisions of infantry were firing at the word of command. It continued until 11 o'clock A. M., when it ceased. A dispatch from Lee stated that his line (behind breastworks, center and left) had been repeatedly assaulted, and every time the enemy was repulsed. The attack, it was supposed, was made to check a flanking movement made yesterday afternoon, by Gen. Ewell, on the enemy's left, to cut his communications with the White House, his base of supplies. No doubt the slaughter has been great! The dispatch from Beauregard indicates that he may be still on the other side of the river. It may be a ruse de guerre, or it may be that the general's enemies here (in the government) are risking everything to keep him from participation in the great battles. Mr. Hunter, being short and fat, rolls about like a pumpkin. He is everywhere, seeking tidings from the field. It is said the enemy, at last, has visited his
Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ays, his campaign will be noted a failure, even in the North. We learn to-day that gold is now at $2.15 in the North. The raiders are beginning to pay the penalty of their temerity; besides Hampton's fight with them, on this side the James River, we learn that W. H. F. Lee has struck them a blow on the south side. June 28 Bright and cool — a little rain last night. The Departmental Battalion is still kept out. They have built a line of fortifications four miles long — to Deep Bottom from near Chaffin's Farm. The Secretary of War intimates that these clerks are kept out by Gen. R. E. Lee. The superintendent of the Central Railroad informed the Secretary of War to-day that the road would be reopened to Staunton on Thursday (day after to-morrow), such is the slight damage done by the enemy. He asks that the bridge near Hanover Junction be defended, that being the only part of the road that can be much injured by a small raiding party. And he don't want the papers
iculars. Beauregard is on the right of our line; Lee's headquarters was at Yellow Tavern. He is sufficiently recovered to direct the battle. Butler has mostly if not entirely evacuated Bermuda Hundred; doubtless gone to Grant. The President rode out this morning toward the battle-field. Every one is confident of success, since Beauregard and Lee command. The Secretary of War granted a passport to Mr. Pollard, who wrote a castigating history of the first years of the war, to visit Europe. Pollard, however, was taken, and is now in the hands of the enemy, at New York. Another row with the Bureau of Conscription. Brig.-Gen. Chilton, Inspector-General, has been investigating operations in Mississippi, at the instance of Gen. Polk; and Col. Preston, Superintendent of the Bureau, disdains to answer their communications. My landlord, Mr. King, has not raised my rent! June 2 Very warm and cloudy. There was no general engagement yesterday, but heavy skirmishing, a
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
service as a private, though the head of a bureau. This evening at 7 o'clock we heard artillery in the direction of Lee's army. June 12 Cold and cloudy. Some firing again this morning, supposed to be merely an artillery duel. Heard from Oustis, in pencil mark on the back of envelope; and he has applied for and obtained a transfer from ordnance duty in the rear, back to his company in the front. It is rumored that Sheridan has cut the road between Gordonsville and Charlottesville, and between that place and Lynchburg. If this be true, he will probably strike south for the Danville Road. Then we shall have confusion here, and the famine intensified. There seems to be no concert among the military commanders, and no unity of purpose among civil functionaries. They mistrust one another, and the people begin to mistrust them all. Meantime the President remains inflexible. All has been quiet to-day. I suppose the enemy is fortifying, with an intention to move
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 40
o day, Gen. Beauregard's plan, dated May 14th. It was addressed to Gen. Bragg, Commanding Confederate States armies. He suggested the falling back on the defenses of Richmond, and detaching 15,000 tt of his position, if nothing else will suffice. What a war, and for what? The Presidency (United States), perhaps! I learn that the Departmental Battalion, near Bottom's Bridge, has been move them. A pontoon train passed down the river to-day, on this side, one captured from the United States, and brought from Gordonsville. If Grant crosses, Lee will cross, still holding the inside the head of Ewell's corps (commanded by Gen. Early) crossed the Rappahannock, yesterday, at United States Ford. If this be so, there must be consternation in Washington; and the government there witered Presidential campaign. Besides, there may at any moment be foreign intervention. The United States can hardly escape a quarrel with France or England. It may occur with both. June 26 H
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ttle rain last night. The Departmental Battalion is still kept out. They have built a line of fortifications four miles long — to Deep Bottom from near Chaffin's Farm. The Secretary of War intimates that these clerks are kept out by Gen. R. E. Lee. The superintendent of the Central Railroad informed the Secretary of War to-day that the road would be reopened to Staunton on Thursday (day after to-morrow), such is the slight damage done by the enemy. He asks that the bridge near Hanover Junction be defended, that being the only part of the road that can be much injured by a small raiding party. And he don't want the papers to say anything about the reopening of the road. The news from the North, that Congress has refused to repeal the $300 clause in their military bill-allowing drafted men to buy out at $300 each-and the rise of gold to $2.30 for $1-together with the apparent or real inertia of Grant, seem to inspire great confidence in our people to-day. They think the w
Yellow Tavern (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
64 Beauregard's plan. the battle. defeat near Staunton. fight at Petersburg. decision about Marylanders Beauregard in disgrace. dispatch from Gen. J. E. Johnston. June 1 Bright and warm. At 71 A. M. cannon and musketry heard northeast of the city, which either ceased or receded out of hearing at 12 M.; or else the hum of the city drowned the sounds of battle. Up to 3 P. M. we have no particulars. Beauregard is on the right of our line; Lee's headquarters was at Yellow Tavern. He is sufficiently recovered to direct the battle. Butler has mostly if not entirely evacuated Bermuda Hundred; doubtless gone to Grant. The President rode out this morning toward the battle-field. Every one is confident of success, since Beauregard and Lee command. The Secretary of War granted a passport to Mr. Pollard, who wrote a castigating history of the first years of the war, to visit Europe. Pollard, however, was taken, and is now in the hands of the enemy, at New Yo
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