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France (France) (search for this): chapter 40
l have ammunition and salt, even if the communication with Wilmington should be interrupted. No, the war must end, and is now near its end; and the Confederacy will achieve its independence. This of itself would suffice, but there may be a diversion in our favor in the North--a revolution there — a thing highly probable during the excitement of an embittered Presidential campaign. Besides, there may at any moment be foreign intervention. The United States can hardly escape a quarrel with France or England. It may occur with both. June 26 Hot and dry, but breezy. A dispatch from Gen. Lee, 9 P. M. last evening, says nothing of moment occurred along the lines yesterday. Our loss in the unsuccessful attempt of Gen. Haygood to storm a portion of the enemy's works, on Friday, was 97 killed and wounded, and 200 missing. Gen. Hampton dispatches Gen. Lee that he attacked the enemy's cavalry in Charles City County, Friday, and drove them out of their intrenchments, pursuing t
J. B. Sale (search for this): chapter 40
e Danville Road, the canal, etc. There is no foundation for any of them, so far as I can learn. June 23 Clear and warm. The news of the capture of 1600 Federals, 4 guns, etc., yesterday at Petersburg, has put the people here in better humor, which has been bad enough, made so by reported rapes perpetrated by negro soldiers on young ladies in Westmoreland County. There has been talk of vengeance, and no doubt such atrocities cause many more to perish than otherwise would die. A Mr. Sale, in the West, sends on an extract from a letter from Col.--, proposing to the government to sell cotton on the Mississippi River for sterling exchange in London, and indicating that in this manner he has large sums to his own credit there, besides $100,000 worth of cotton in this country. Col.--is a commissary, against whom grave charges have been made frequently, of speculation, etc., but was defended by the Commissary-General. Mr. Harvey, president Danville Railroad, telegraphs to G
orgia to reinforce Grant It seems Lincoln would give up his hopes of heaven, and plunge into hell, for the Presidency. The Commissary General says Lee must beat Grant before the latter is reinforced, or we are gone; for their destruction of the railroads, north and northwest, will ruin us — the southern roads being insufficient to transport stores for the army. My nephew, Col. R. H. Musser, trans-Mississippi, I am told by Senator Clark, was complimented on the field of victory by Gen. Taylor. His brigadier-general having fallen, Col. M. commanded the brigade. Last evening, about 6 P. M., a cloud nearly overhead assumed the shape of a section of our fortifications, the segment of a circle, with the triangle penetrating through from the north. These shapes were distinctly defined. Could the operations beneath have produced this phenomenon? was it accidental? or a portent of the future? God knows! June 5 Raining. The sudden booming of artillery, shelling our de
rday — if there was one. If the government is in possession of information, it is, for some purpose, studiously kept from the public, and why, I cannot imagine, unless there has been a disaster, or Beauregard has done something not approved. I do not think the people here appreciate the importance of the contest on the south side of the river. If Lee's army were broken, I doubt whether it would even attempt to regain the fortifications of Richmond, for then it might share the fate of Pemberton's army at Vicksburg. And the fall of Richmond would involve the fall of the State, and Virginia would immediately become a free State. June 20 A fog; subsequently dry and dusty, but the sun in a haze, like Indian summer. As I feared; there is trouble with Beauregard. He drew off his troops from in front of Bermuda Hundred to reinforce the fewer regiments at Petersburg, and saved that city, and Gen. Lee had to drive the enemy off again from the abandoned line. It is said Beaure
J. E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 40
ent! June 2 Very warm and cloudy. There was no general engagement yesterday, but heavy skirmishing, and several assaults at different points; and a dispatch from Gen. Lee says they resulted favorably to our arms. A dispatch from Gen. Johnston says his men are in good plight, after combats enough to make a battle, in all of which the enemy suffered most. The local troops (Custis's battalion, etc.) were ordered out today. I have not understood to what point they were ordered; bthe Republican party, and giving an opportunity for the Democrats to elect a President. If we can only subsist till then, we may have peace, and must have independence at all events. But there is discontent, in the Army of the West, with Gen. Johnston, and in the East with Bragg, and among the croakers with the President. New potatoes sold to-day for $5 per quart, $160 per bushel! Mr. Rhodes, Commissioner of Patents, told me to-day that Gen. Forrest, at last accounts, was at Tupelo
J. J. Pollard (search for this): chapter 40
not entirely evacuated Bermuda Hundred; doubtless gone to Grant. The President rode out this morning toward the battle-field. Every one is confident of success, since Beauregard and Lee command. The Secretary of War granted a passport to Mr. Pollard, who wrote a castigating history of the first years of the war, to visit Europe. Pollard, however, was taken, and is now in the hands of the enemy, at New York. Another row with the Bureau of Conscription. Brig.-Gen. Chilton, Inspector-GePollard, however, was taken, and is now in the hands of the enemy, at New York. Another row with the Bureau of Conscription. Brig.-Gen. Chilton, Inspector-General, has been investigating operations in Mississippi, at the instance of Gen. Polk; and Col. Preston, Superintendent of the Bureau, disdains to answer their communications. My landlord, Mr. King, has not raised my rent! June 2 Very warm and cloudy. There was no general engagement yesterday, but heavy skirmishing, and several assaults at different points; and a dispatch from Gen. Lee says they resulted favorably to our arms. A dispatch from Gen. Johnston says his men are in
S. Basset French (search for this): chapter 40
hope we shall speedily have better times, and I think, unless some terrible misfortune happens to our arms, the invader will surely be soon hurled from our soil. What President Lincoln came to Grant for is merely conjecture-unquestionably he could not suggest any military enterprise more to our detriment than would occur to his generals. June 29 Clear and cool-afterward hazy. Marietta, June 27th. General Braxton Bragg. The enemy advanced on our whole line to-day. They assaulted French, Cheatham, Cleburn, Stevenson, and Quarles, by whom they were repulsed. On the rest of the line the skirmishing was severe. Their loss is supposed to be great. Ours is known to be small. J. E. Johnston, General. The dispatch from Gen. Johnston gives an encouraging account of the fight in Georgia. But a dispatch from the West states that reinforcements (20,000) for Sherman's army are marching from La Grange. It is reported and believed that Gen. Early, at the head of 25,000
ulars. Beauregard is on the right of our line; Lee's headquarters was at Yellow Tavern. He is sufe is confident of success, since Beauregard and Lee command. The Secretary of War granted a pasults at different points; and a dispatch from Gen. Lee says they resulted favorably to our arms. d; but it indicates the imminency of a battle. Lee has not less than 80,000 men — veterans. I eless, Beauregard is here with some 20,000, and Lee did fall back to the defenses of Richmond. o'clock A. M., when it ceased. A dispatch from Lee stated that his line (behind breastworks, centeexception of some Federals piled up in front of Lee's breastworks. A deserter says Grant intends to stink Lee out of his position, if nothing else will suffice. What a war, and for what? The Pres and yet, so far from striking down the army of Lee with superior numbers, we see, at this moment, and 200 missing. Gen. Hampton dispatches Gen. Lee that he attacked the enemy's cavalry in Charl[8 more...]
The Secretary of War granted a passport to Mr. Pollard, who wrote a castigating history of the first years of the war, to visit Europe. Pollard, however, was taken, and is now in the hands of the enemy, at New York. Another row with the Bureau of Conscription. Brig.-Gen. Chilton, Inspector-General, has been investigating operations in Mississippi, at the instance of Gen. Polk; and Col. Preston, Superintendent of the Bureau, disdains to answer their communications. My landlord, Mr. King, has not raised my rent! June 2 Very warm and cloudy. There was no general engagement yesterday, but heavy skirmishing, and several assaults at different points; and a dispatch from Gen. Lee says they resulted favorably to our arms. A dispatch from Gen. Johnston says his men are in good plight, after combats enough to make a battle, in all of which the enemy suffered most. The local troops (Custis's battalion, etc.) were ordered out today. I have not understood to what po
o send 6000 more troops to Western Virginia, as Breckinridge has only 9000 and the enemy 18,000. Lieut.-Gen Holmes sends from Raleigh, N. C., a letter from Hon. T. Bragg, revealing the existence of a secret organization in communication with the enemy, styled the H. O. A.; and asking authority to arrest certain men supposed to charges have been made frequently, of speculation, etc., but was defended by the Commissary-General. Mr. Harvey, president Danville Railroad, telegraphs to Gen. Bragg to send troops without delay, or the road will be ruined by the raiders. Bragg sends the paper to the Secretary of War, saying there are no troops but those inBragg sends the paper to the Secretary of War, saying there are no troops but those in the army of Gen. Lee, and the reserves, the latter now being called out. Ten days ago, Mr. Secretary Seddon had fair warning about this road. June 24 Hot and hazy; dry. The news (in the papers) of the cutting of our railroad communications with the South creates fresh apprehension among the croakers. But at 12 M. we
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