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Essex County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
plies. No doubt the slaughter has been great! The dispatch from Beauregard indicates that he may be still on the other side of the river. It may be a ruse de guerre, or it may be that the general's enemies here (in the government) are risking everything to keep him from participation in the great battles. Mr. Hunter, being short and fat, rolls about like a pumpkin. He is everywhere, seeking tidings from the field. It is said the enemy, at last, has visited his great estates in Essex County; but he'll escape loss by hook or by crook. He has made enormously by his crops and his mills: nevertheless, he would sacrifice all for the Presidency-and independence. The President, yesterday, forbade details from the Department Battalion to remain in the city. The Southern Express Company has bribed the quartermasters, and is at its work again, using fine horses and stout details that should be in the army. Its wagon was at the department to-day with a box of bacon for Judge
London, Madison County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ederals, 4 guns, etc., yesterday at Petersburg, has put the people here in better humor, which has been bad enough, made so by reported rapes perpetrated by negro soldiers on young ladies in Westmoreland County. There has been talk of vengeance, and no doubt such atrocities cause many more to perish than otherwise would die. A Mr. Sale, in the West, sends on an extract from a letter from Col.--, proposing to the government to sell cotton on the Mississippi River for sterling exchange in London, and indicating that in this manner he has large sums to his own credit there, besides $100,000 worth of cotton in this country. Col.--is a commissary, against whom grave charges have been made frequently, of speculation, etc., but was defended by the Commissary-General. Mr. Harvey, president Danville Railroad, telegraphs to Gen. Bragg to send troops without delay, or the road will be ruined by the raiders. Bragg sends the paper to the Secretary of War, saying there are no troops but t
York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
resident, and the President to Gen. B., who sends them now to the Secretary. Gen. V. calls loudly for reinforcements to save Staunton, and says Gen. W. E. Jones, who commanded, was killed. Col. Lee says, We have been pretty badly whipped. Gen. Bragg knows of no reinforcements that can be sent, and says Gen. R. E. Lee has command there as well as here, and was never interfered with. Gen. B. says he had tendered Gen. Lee his services, but they had not been accepted. Small heads of early York cabbage sold in market to-day at $3, or $5 for two. At that rate, I got about $10 worth out of my garden. Mine are excellent, and so far abundant, as well as the lettuce, which we have every day. My snap beans and beets will soon come on. The little garden is a little treasure. June 7 Rained in the night, clear and cool in the morning. Gen. Breckinridge's division started toward the Valley early this morning. All is quiet near the city; but firing has been heard in the directi
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 40
The news of the capture of 1600 Federals, 4 guns, etc., yesterday at Petersburg, has put the people here in better humor, which has been bad enough, made so by reported rapes perpetrated by negro soldiers on young ladies in Westmoreland County. There has been talk of vengeance, and no doubt such atrocities cause many more to perish than otherwise would die. A Mr. Sale, in the West, sends on an extract from a letter from Col.--, proposing to the government to sell cotton on the Mississippi River for sterling exchange in London, and indicating that in this manner he has large sums to his own credit there, besides $100,000 worth of cotton in this country. Col.--is a commissary, against whom grave charges have been made frequently, of speculation, etc., but was defended by the Commissary-General. Mr. Harvey, president Danville Railroad, telegraphs to Gen. Bragg to send troops without delay, or the road will be ruined by the raiders. Bragg sends the paper to the Secretary of
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ock A. M. Now if any one were to tell these things to the President, he would not believe him. June 14 Clear and cool. Gen. Grant has changed his base-disappearing from the front of Lee in the night. He is supposed to be endeavoring to get his army below the city, and in communication with Butler on the south side. A. dispatch from Gen. Lee says Gen. Hampton has defeated Sheridan. Forrest has gained a victory in the West. Lincoln has been nominated-Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee, for Vice-President. Gen. Whiting writes that supplies from abroad are coming in abundantly at Wilmington, N. C. If we can only preserve our communications with the South, I regard the campaign, if not the war, pretty nearly at an end, and Richmond safe! Grant has failed, after doing his utmost to take Richmond. He has shattered a great army to no purpose; while Lee's army is as strong as ever. This is true generalship in Lee. But Grant can get more men. June 15 Clear and
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
they never would be called out except to defend the fortifications of the city, built by negroes! June 27 Bright and hot-afterward light showers. By the papers we learn that President Lincoln has been on a visit to Grant's army. If Grant does not accomplish some great wonder in a few days, his campaign will be noted a failure, even in the North. We learn to-day that gold is now at $2.15 in the North. The raiders are beginning to pay the penalty of their temerity; besides Hampton's fight with them, on this side the James River, we learn that W. H. F. Lee has struck them a blow on the south side. June 28 Bright and cool — a little rain last night. The Departmental Battalion is still kept out. They have built a line of fortifications four miles long — to Deep Bottom from near Chaffin's Farm. The Secretary of War intimates that these clerks are kept out by Gen. R. E. Lee. The superintendent of the Central Railroad informed the Secretary of War to-day tha
Staunton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
Xxxix. June, 1864 Beauregard's plan. the battle. defeat near Staunton. fight at Petersburg. decision about Marylanders Beauregard in disgrace. dispa shells and sharpshooters. We have met with a defeat. in the Valley, near Staunton, which place has probably fallen. A letter from Gen. Bragg, this morning, in ds them now to the Secretary. Gen. V. calls loudly for reinforcements to save Staunton, and says Gen. W. E. Jones, who commanded, was killed. Col. Lee says, We havefficial report shows that we lost no arms or ordnance stores of consequence at Staunton. Communications will be restored in that direction soon. The Valley and Westilroad informed the Secretary of War to-day that the road would be reopened to Staunton on Thursday (day after to-morrow), such is the slight damage done by the enemyported and believed that Gen. Early, at the head of 25,000 men, marched out of Staunton on Monday toward the North. I hope it may not prove a recruiting measure for
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
one. If the government is in possession of information, it is, for some purpose, studiously kept from the public, and why, I cannot imagine, unless there has been a disaster, or Beauregard has done something not approved. I do not think the people here appreciate the importance of the contest on the south side of the river. If Lee's army were broken, I doubt whether it would even attempt to regain the fortifications of Richmond, for then it might share the fate of Pemberton's army at Vicksburg. And the fall of Richmond would involve the fall of the State, and Virginia would immediately become a free State. June 20 A fog; subsequently dry and dusty, but the sun in a haze, like Indian summer. As I feared; there is trouble with Beauregard. He drew off his troops from in front of Bermuda Hundred to reinforce the fewer regiments at Petersburg, and saved that city, and Gen. Lee had to drive the enemy off again from the abandoned line. It is said Beauregard acted contrary
Tupelo (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
the Republican party, and giving an opportunity for the Democrats to elect a President. If we can only subsist till then, we may have peace, and must have independence at all events. But there is discontent, in the Army of the West, with Gen. Johnston, and in the East with Bragg, and among the croakers with the President. New potatoes sold to-day for $5 per quart, $160 per bushel! Mr. Rhodes, Commissioner of Patents, told me to-day that Gen. Forrest, at last accounts, was at Tupelo, Miss., doing nothing,--Gen. Wheeler, his junior in years, superior in rank, to whom he is again subordinated by the potency of Gen. Cooper's red tape, having most of his men. Robert Tyler has been with the Departmental Battalion at Bottom's Bridge, doing service as a private, though the head of a bureau. This evening at 7 o'clock we heard artillery in the direction of Lee's army. June 12 Cold and cloudy. Some firing again this morning, supposed to be merely an artillery duel.
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ed back by overwhelming numbers from the outer line of defenses. To-day it is reported that they are fighting again at Petersburg, and great masses of troops are in motion. The war will be determined, perhaps, by the operations of a day or two; and much anxiety is felt by all. A letter from Hon. G. A. Henry, on the Danville Railroad, saying only 1000 men were there to defend it, with but two cannon without appropiate ammunition! Soon after a dispatch came from Col. Withers, at Danville, stating it was reported 10,000 of the enemy were approaching the road, and only thirty-two miles distant. He called for reinforcements, but stated his belief that the number of the enemy was exaggerated. I delivered these to the Secretary myself, finding him engaged writing a long letter to Gen. Kirby Smith, beyond the Mississippi! In this moment of doubt and apprehension, I saw Mr. Randolph, formerly Secretary of War, and Mr. G. A. Myers, his law colleague, at the telegraph office
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