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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
from their batteries, the existence of which we had no knowledge of before. No one was hurt. About the same time Gen. Beauregard sprung a mine under the enemy's mine, and blew it up, no doubt destroying many lives. This was succeeded by heavy, but, perhaps, harmless shelling along the lines. Another raiding party has been defeated and dispersed at Madison, Ga. But we have been unfortunate in a naval engagement in the lower bay, at Mobile. We have lost Admiral Buchanan's ram Tennessee, and several other steamers. One of the enemy's monitors was sunk. They had five vessels to our one. Battles are momentarily expected at Atlanta and Winchester. We have nothing Additional from the North. August 7 Hot and dry; but heavy rains in other parts of the State. The 1st Army Corps moved through the city last night, via the Central and Fredericksburg Railroads, and this morning Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry corps is passing in the same direction-9 A. M. All this indica
Madison, Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
ot and dry. The booming of cannon heard yesterday evening was from one of our batteries below Drewry's Bluff. The enemy answered from their batteries, the existence of which we had no knowledge of before. No one was hurt. About the same time Gen. Beauregard sprung a mine under the enemy's mine, and blew it up, no doubt destroying many lives. This was succeeded by heavy, but, perhaps, harmless shelling along the lines. Another raiding party has been defeated and dispersed at Madison, Ga. But we have been unfortunate in a naval engagement in the lower bay, at Mobile. We have lost Admiral Buchanan's ram Tennessee, and several other steamers. One of the enemy's monitors was sunk. They had five vessels to our one. Battles are momentarily expected at Atlanta and Winchester. We have nothing Additional from the North. August 7 Hot and dry; but heavy rains in other parts of the State. The 1st Army Corps moved through the city last night, via the Central and
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
s been defeated and dispersed at Madison, Ga. But we have been unfortunate in a naval engagement in the lower bay, at Mobile. We have lost Admiral Buchanan's ram Tennessee, and several other steamers. One of the enemy's monitors was sunk. Theyaines and Powell are lost — the latter blown up. Gen. Maury telegraphs for infantry, has some 4000 men for the defense of Mobile, etc. Our raiders, under McCausland and Bradley Johnson, it is said were surprised and defeated last Sunday, with losf the movement of troops northward. Hampton's division of cavalry, at least three brigades, passed this morning. From Mobile and Atlanta we have nothing of interest. Flour is falling: it is now $200 per barrel-$500 a few weeks ago; and bacon y tomatoes are beginning to mature-better late than never. The following official dispatch was received on Saturday: Mobile, August 11th. Nothing later from Fort Morgan. The wires are broken. Gen. Forrest drove the enemy's advance out of Ox
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
s rumored that Pemberton lost more batteries; but it is only rumor, so far. Nor have we anything definite from Early or Hood. Bacon has fallen to $5 and $6 per pound, flour to $175 per barrel. I hope we shall get some provisions from the South this week. Sowed turnip-seed in every available spot of my garden to-day. My tomatoes are beginning to mature-better late than never. The following official dispatch was received on Saturday: Mobile, August 11th. Nothing later from Fort Morgan. The wires are broken. Gen. Forrest drove the enemy's advance out of Oxford last night. All the particulars of the Fort Gaines surrender known, are that the commanding officer communicated with the enemy, and made terms, without authority. His fort was in good condition, the garrison having suffered little. He made no reply to repeated orders and signals from Gen. Page to hold his fort, and surrendered upon conditions not known here. D. H. Maury, Major-General. Gen. Taylo
Washington (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
t is said were surprised and defeated last Sunday, with loss of 400 men, 500 horses, and 4 pieces of artillery. A rumor prevails that Early has gained another victory near Winchester. No news yet from our agent sent to North Carolina to purchase supplies, but we learn flour and bacon are not held one quarter as high there as here. I do sincerely hope Grant's raiders will keep quiet until I can get something to eat! August 11 Hot and dry. Dispatches from secret agents at Washington state that Grant and his staff have arrived, that half his army preceded him, and the remainder will soon follow. The campaign is considered a disastrous failure, and it is anticipated that henceforth the scene of operations is to be transferred from Richmond to Washington. They say President Lincoln's face expresses great terror, and affairs there are in a critical condition. A dispatch from Gen. Lee states that Gen. Bradley Johnson's brigade of cavalry was surprised and routed on the
Hanover County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
arms. We have nothing yet from Atlanta, but no doubt there has been another battle. I hope no disaster has befallen us there. No doubt the wires have been cut by the raiders, and roads also. It is a critical time in Georgia. But if Virginia triumphs over the assaults of Grant, all will go well. August 2 Bright and hot. At 4 P. M. a cloud rising. Fear my wife, and daughter Fannie, and Custis (who has a days' furlough), who went this morning per Fredericksburg Railroad into Hanover County to gather blackberries, will be caught in a rain. Nevertheless, the rain is wanted. Assistant Secretary Campbell is again allowing doubtful characters to pass out of the Confederate States to the United States; among these is Dr. McClure, the embalmer, who, too, carried others out for bribes. The Signal Bureau gives information to-day of Grant's purpose to spring the mine already sprung, also of a raid, that was abandoned, north and west of Richmond. They say Grant has now but
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
enounce in unmeasured terms the high schedule of prices recently sanctioned by the Commissary and Quartermaster's bureaus. And, although the schedule has been modified, much odium will attach to all concerned in it. A large farmer, at the rates fixed for his products, would realize, perhaps, $200,000 per annum. August 5 Hot and dry. I hope there will be a rain-cloud this evening. No war news, except a letter from Gen. Lee, indicating that Gen. Morgan is probably on a raid in Northwest Virginia and in Pennsylvania. Morgan proposed going into Georgia (rear of Sherman), but the Secretary indorsed that perhaps the matter had as well be left to Gen. Lee. The President quietly indorsed that he concurred in the conclusion that all the movements of troops in Virginia had best be left to the discretion of Gen Lee. Gen. Hood telegraphs that no important change has occurred in front of Atlanta. There was some skirmishing yesterday, and shell thrown into Atlanta. My daughter A
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 42
bes. The Signal Bureau gives information to-day of Grant's purpose to spring the mine already sprung, also of a raid, that was abandoned, north and west of Richmond. They say Grant has now but 70,000 men, there being only a few men left at Washington. Can the agents paid by the Signal Bureau be relied on? Gen. Bragg telegraphs from Columbus, Ga., that Gen. Roddy has been ordered to reassemble his forces in North Alabama, to cut Sherman's communications. The news from Georgia is mord his staff have arrived, that half his army preceded him, and the remainder will soon follow. The campaign is considered a disastrous failure, and it is anticipated that henceforth the scene of operations is to be transferred from Richmond to Washington. They say President Lincoln's face expresses great terror, and affairs there are in a critical condition. A dispatch from Gen. Lee states that Gen. Bradley Johnson's brigade of cavalry was surprised and routed on the 7th inst. by Averill.
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
2000 small arms. We have nothing yet from Atlanta, but no doubt there has been another battle. my's account of our loss in the battle before Atlanta is exaggerated greatly. Sherman's army is doare now daily throwing shell into Charleston, Atlanta, and Petersburg. A letter to the Secretar no important change has occurred in front of Atlanta. There was some skirmishing yesterday, and shell thrown into Atlanta. My daughter Anne, after ten months residence in the country, returned one. Battles are momentarily expected at Atlanta and Winchester. We have nothing Additional fay. It was on an order for a quartermaster at Atlanta to report here and settle his accounts. Mr. be relieved. A dispatch from Gen. Hood (Atlanta, Ga.) says no important change in affair has occdes, passed this morning. From Mobile and Atlanta we have nothing of interest. Flour is fal on the 18th of this month. Sherman must get Atlanta quickly, or not at all. August 16 Warm [2 more...]
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
Bradley Johnson, it is said were surprised and defeated last Sunday, with loss of 400 men, 500 horses, and 4 pieces of artillery. A rumor prevails that Early has gained another victory near Winchester. No news yet from our agent sent to North Carolina to purchase supplies, but we learn flour and bacon are not held one quarter as high there as here. I do sincerely hope Grant's raiders will keep quiet until I can get something to eat! August 11 Hot and dry. Dispatches from secretline. We have now some further details of the battle of Tuesday. Our loss was 1000; the enemy's, it is said, 5000 to 8000. It is now, 5 P. M., raining gently, thank Heaven! To-day we had a distribution of meats, etc. brought from North Carolina by our agent. Custis and I invested $200: we have received 26 pounds bacon and 24 smoked herrings — worth here about $200. Half the money remains in the agent's hands, for which we expect to get 300 pounds of flour — if the enemy will let th
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