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Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 42
dge that Grant sustained a terrible disaster at Petersburg, losing in killed, wounded, and missing 5000. They say the negro troops caused the failure, by running back and breaking the lines of the whites. The blacks were pushed forward in front, and suffered most. From the same source we learn that our troops have penetrated Pennsylvania, and laid the city of Chambersburg in ashes. This may be so, as they have burned some half dozen of our towns, and are now daily throwing shell into Charleston, Atlanta, and Petersburg. A letter to the Secretary from J. Thompson, in Canada (per Capt. Hines), was received to-day. He says the work will not probably begin before the middle of August., I know not what sort of work. But he says much caution is necessary. I suppose it to be the destruction of the Federal army depots, etc. in the United States. Public meetings and the public press continue to denounce in unmeasured terms the high schedule of prices recently sanctioned by the C
e to dislodge the enemy from Deep Bottom, on this side of the river, and to select three or four batteries to render the navigation of the James River difficult and dangerous. Col. P. says he must have some 1500 cavalry, etc. Letters from Mr. McRae, our agent abroad, show that our finances and credit are improving wonderfully, and that the government will soon have a great many fine steamers running the blockade. Mr. McR. has contracted for eight steel-clad steamers with a single firm, Frazer, Trenholm & Co.-the latter now our Secretary of the Treasury. The President indorsed a cutting rebuke to both the Secretary of War and--Mr. (now Lieut.-Col.) Melton, A. A. General's office, to day. It was on an order for a quartermaster at Atlanta to report here and settle his accounts. Mr. M. had written on the order that it was issued by order of the President. The President said he was responsible for all orders issued by the War Department, but it was a great presumption of any off
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 42
t assert that still another raiding party, besides Stoneman's, was dispersed or captured. It is rumored to-day that Beauregard has sprung a mine under Grant's fortifications. This may be so. Later. It was not so. August 4 Clear and hot. rom their batteries, the existence of which we had no knowledge of before. No one was hurt. About the same time Gen. Beauregard sprung a mine under the enemy's mine, and blew it up, no doubt destroying many lives. This was succeeded by heavy, d our lines, the operations on this side of the river having been more a feint to draw our forces away; another that Gen. Beauregard attacked the enemy, finding their troops in large force had crossed over to this side, and this in the absence of Ge War was with the President from 11 A. M. till 3 P. M. This might be on appointments and promotions, and it might be on Beauregard. About 5 P. M. brisk artillery firing was heard in a southeast direction, which increased in rapidity, and apparent
inia triumphs over the assaults of Grant, all will go well. August 2 Bright and hot. At 4 P. M. a cloud rising. Fear my wife, and daughter Fannie, and Custis (who has a days' furlough), who went this morning per Fredericksburg Railroad into Hanover County to gather blackberries, will be caught in a rain. Nevertheless, the rain is wanted. Assistant Secretary Campbell is again allowing doubtful characters to pass out of the Confederate States to the United States; among these is Dr. McClure, the embalmer, who, too, carried others out for bribes. The Signal Bureau gives information to-day of Grant's purpose to spring the mine already sprung, also of a raid, that was abandoned, north and west of Richmond. They say Grant has now but 70,000 men, there being only a few men left at Washington. Can the agents paid by the Signal Bureau be relied on? Gen. Bragg telegraphs from Columbus, Ga., that Gen. Roddy has been ordered to reassemble his forces in North Alabama, to cut
Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 42
Central and Fredericksburg Railroads, and this morning Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry corps is passing in the same direction-9 A. Mompted by President Lincoln, who is no general. Honor to Lee!-the savior of his country! and the noble band of heroes whrs there are in a critical condition. A dispatch from Gen. Lee states that Gen. Bradley Johnson's brigade of cavalry washad crossed over to this side, and this in the absence of Gen. Lee, he taking the responsibility. Be this as it may, some sfficial announcement of the work of yesterday afternoon. Gen. Lee's dispatch says we captured 2700 prisoners near Petersburnor to sustain him. The price of flour has fallen again; Lee's victory frightening the dealers. Robert Hill, commissireet, gave me two pounds of coffee to-day when I told him of Lee's dispatch. It was accepted, of course, and is worth some $ worth some $20 per pound. Guns are heard down the river again this evening, and all are wondering what Lee is doing now.
C. J. McRae (search for this): chapter 42
Xli. August, 1864 From the Northern papers. letter from J. Thompson, Canada. from Mr. McRae, our foreign agent. dispatch from Major Gen. Maury. General order no. 65. battle of Reams's Station. August 1 Hot and clear; but it rained yesterday threequarters of an hour in the afternoon. Our loss in the affair at Petersburg is about 800, the enemy's 3500. We captured 2000 small arms. We have nothing yet from Atlanta, but no doubt there has been another battle. I ce to dislodge the enemy from Deep Bottom, on this side of the river, and to select three or four batteries to render the navigation of the James River difficult and dangerous. Col. P. says he must have some 1500 cavalry, etc. Letters from Mr. McRae, our agent abroad, show that our finances and credit are improving wonderfully, and that the government will soon have a great many fine steamers running the blockade. Mr. McR. has contracted for eight steel-clad steamers with a single firm, F
— the failure of Grant's mad Bull campaign, prompted by President Lincoln, who is no general. Honor to Lee!-the savior of his country! and the noble band of heroes whom he has led to victory!-but first to God. August 8 Hot and dry. There are rumors of battles near Winchester and in Georgia. Mr. Benjamin writes the Secretary of War for a passport for --, who is going to New York, for our service. In the assault on the fortifications near Petersburg last week, it is said Hancock's (enemy's) corps lost half its men. Watermelons have sold at $20 each; corn, $10 per dozen ears; and everything else in the markets in proportion. My yellow tomatoes are just maturing. The dry weather has ruined nearly everything else in the garden. August 9 Very hot; very dry; very dusty. The President has directed the late Gen. (now Lieut.--Col.) Pemberton to organize a mortar and cavalry force to dislodge the enemy from Deep Bottom, on this side of the river, and to s
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 42
below the window-sill of the chamber on the second floor, where Custis and Tom were lying. Some one, I suppose, had heedlessly fired his gun, after returning from the fortifications. Well, the papers to-day fall below the official announcement of the work of yesterday afternoon. Gen. Lee's dispatch says we captured 2700 prisoners near Petersburg on the Weldon Road. No other particulars are given, and the affair is still in mystery, for some purpose, perhaps. It is rumored that Gen. Hampton captured 4000 men last night or this morning; but I doubt. Without that, the week's work is good-Grant losing from 10,000 to 15,000 men. A few more weeks, at that rate, will consume his army, and then---peace? Gen. Bragg complains, in a letter to the Secretary of War, that the orders of the department, and of the Adjutant-General, are not furnished him, which must diminish, if persisted in, his usefulness in the important position to which the President has called him. They, are all
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 42
o spring the mine already sprung, also of a raid, that was abandoned, north and west of Richmond. They say Grant has now but 70,000 men, there being only a few men left at Washington. Can the agents paid by the Signal Bureau be relied on? Gen. Bragg telegraphs from Columbus, Ga., that Gen. Roddy has been ordered to reassemble his forces in North Alabama, to cut Sherman's communications. The news from Georgia is more cheering. The commissioners (of prices) have reduced the schedule: is rumored that Gen. Hampton captured 4000 men last night or this morning; but I doubt. Without that, the week's work is good-Grant losing from 10,000 to 15,000 men. A few more weeks, at that rate, will consume his army, and then---peace? Gen. Bragg complains, in a letter to the Secretary of War, that the orders of the department, and of the Adjutant-General, are not furnished him, which must diminish, if persisted in, his usefulness in the important position to which the President has ca
er. The following official dispatch was received on Saturday: Mobile, August 11th. Nothing later from Fort Morgan. The wires are broken. Gen. Forrest drove the enemy's advance out of Oxford last night. All the particulars of the Fort Gaines surrender known, are that the commanding officer communicated with the enemy, and made terms, without authority. His fort was in good condition, the garrison having suffered little. He made no reply to repeated orders and signals from Gen. Page to hold his fort, and surrendered upon conditions not known here. D. H. Maury, Major-General. Gen. Taylor will cross the Mississippi with 4000 on the 18th of this month. Sherman must get Atlanta quickly, or not at all. August 16 Warm and cloudy. There are movements of interest of the armies below, from the fact that we have as yet no authentic account of the fighting during the last few days. I fear we have not been so successful as usual. The enemy is reported to be
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