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es is wounded. There are 5000 militia in the trenches. August 12 Hot and dry. At 3 P. M. rained about three minutes. We are burning up. There is no war news. A rumor in the street says Atlanta has fallen. I don't believe it. Yesterday Gen. Hood said no important change had occurred, etc. I saw a soldier to-day from Gen. Early's army near Martinsburg, and the indications were that it was on the eve of crossing the Potomac. He left it day before yesterday, 10th inst. He says Kershaw's division was at Culpepper C. H., 50 miles from Early. Detachments of troops are daily passing through the city, northward. All is quiet below on the James River. Grant's campaign against Richmond is confessedly a failure. August 13 Hot and dry. Large green worms have attacked my tomatoes, and from the leaves are proceeding to the fruit. But not many of them will escape! I am warring on them. No war news, except the continuation of the movement of troops northward. Hampto
G. W. Randolph (search for this): chapter 42
herman), but the Secretary indorsed that perhaps the matter had as well be left to Gen. Lee. The President quietly indorsed that he concurred in the conclusion that all the movements of troops in Virginia had best be left to the discretion of Gen Lee. Gen. Hood telegraphs that no important change has occurred in front of Atlanta. There was some skirmishing yesterday, and shell thrown into Atlanta. My daughter Anne, after ten months residence in the country, returned to-day (with Miss Randolph, of Loudon Co.) in perfect health. She brought apples, eggs, a watermelon, cucumbers, etc. Mr. Davies sold my reel (German silver) to-day for $75, or about $3.20 in gold-enough to buy a cord of wood. I parted with it reluctantly, as I hope to catch fish yet. August 6 Hot and dry. The booming of cannon heard yesterday evening was from one of our batteries below Drewry's Bluff. The enemy answered from their batteries, the existence of which we had no knowledge of before.
uietly indorsed that he concurred in the conclusion that all the movements of troops in Virginia had best be left to the discretion of Gen Lee. Gen. Hood telegraphs that no important change has occurred in front of Atlanta. There was some skirmishing yesterday, and shell thrown into Atlanta. My daughter Anne, after ten months residence in the country, returned to-day (with Miss Randolph, of Loudon Co.) in perfect health. She brought apples, eggs, a watermelon, cucumbers, etc. Mr. Davies sold my reel (German silver) to-day for $75, or about $3.20 in gold-enough to buy a cord of wood. I parted with it reluctantly, as I hope to catch fish yet. August 6 Hot and dry. The booming of cannon heard yesterday evening was from one of our batteries below Drewry's Bluff. The enemy answered from their batteries, the existence of which we had no knowledge of before. No one was hurt. About the same time Gen. Beauregard sprung a mine under the enemy's mine, and blew it up
The enemy answered from their batteries, the existence of which we had no knowledge of before. No one was hurt. About the same time Gen. Beauregard sprung a mine under the enemy's mine, and blew it up, no doubt destroying many lives. This was succeeded by heavy, but, perhaps, harmless shelling along the lines. Another raiding party has been defeated and dispersed at Madison, Ga. But we have been unfortunate in a naval engagement in the lower bay, at Mobile. We have lost Admiral Buchanan's ram Tennessee, and several other steamers. One of the enemy's monitors was sunk. They had five vessels to our one. Battles are momentarily expected at Atlanta and Winchester. We have nothing Additional from the North. August 7 Hot and dry; but heavy rains in other parts of the State. The 1st Army Corps moved through the city last night, via the Central and Fredericksburg Railroads, and this morning Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry corps is passing in the same direction-9 A. M.
James A. Campbell (search for this): chapter 42
s befallen us there. No doubt the wires have been cut by the raiders, and roads also. It is a critical time in Georgia. But if Virginia triumphs over the assaults of Grant, all will go well. August 2 Bright and hot. At 4 P. M. a cloud rising. Fear my wife, and daughter Fannie, and Custis (who has a days' furlough), who went this morning per Fredericksburg Railroad into Hanover County to gather blackberries, will be caught in a rain. Nevertheless, the rain is wanted. Assistant Secretary Campbell is again allowing doubtful characters to pass out of the Confederate States to the United States; among these is Dr. McClure, the embalmer, who, too, carried others out for bribes. The Signal Bureau gives information to-day of Grant's purpose to spring the mine already sprung, also of a raid, that was abandoned, north and west of Richmond. They say Grant has now but 70,000 men, there being only a few men left at Washington. Can the agents paid by the Signal Bureau be relied
00. They say the negro troops caused the failure, by running back and breaking the lines of the whites. The blacks were pushed forward in front, and suffered most. From the same source we learn that our troops have penetrated Pennsylvania, and laid the city of Chambersburg in ashes. This may be so, as they have burned some half dozen of our towns, and are now daily throwing shell into Charleston, Atlanta, and Petersburg. A letter to the Secretary from J. Thompson, in Canada (per Capt. Hines), was received to-day. He says the work will not probably begin before the middle of August., I know not what sort of work. But he says much caution is necessary. I suppose it to be the destruction of the Federal army depots, etc. in the United States. Public meetings and the public press continue to denounce in unmeasured terms the high schedule of prices recently sanctioned by the Commissary and Quartermaster's bureaus. And, although the schedule has been modified, much odium wil
curred in the conclusion that all the movements of troops in Virginia had best be left to the discretion of Gen Lee. Gen. Hood telegraphs that no important change has occurred in front of Atlanta. There was some skirmishing yesterday, and shell ry was surprised and routed on the 7th inst. by Averill. He has directed that Gen. J. be relieved. A dispatch from Gen. Hood (Atlanta, Ga.) says no important change in affair has occurred since yesterday, except that Major- Gen..Bates is woundere burning up. There is no war news. A rumor in the street says Atlanta has fallen. I don't believe it. Yesterday Gen. Hood said no important change had occurred, etc. I saw a soldier to-day from Gen. Early's army near Martinsburg, and thet is rumored that Pemberton lost more batteries; but it is only rumor, so far. Nor have we anything definite from Early or Hood. Bacon has fallen to $5 and $6 per pound, flour to $175 per barrel. I hope we shall get some provisions from the Sout
J. Thompson (search for this): chapter 42
Xli. August, 1864 From the Northern papers. letter from J. Thompson, Canada. from Mr. McRae, our foreign agent. dispatch from Major Gen. Maury. General order no. 65. battle of Reams's Station. August 1 Hot and clear; but it rained yesterday threequarters of an hour in the afternoon. Our loss in the affair at Petersburg is about 800, the enemy's 3500. We captured 2000 small arms. We have nothing yet from Atlanta, but no doubt there has been another battle. I netrated Pennsylvania, and laid the city of Chambersburg in ashes. This may be so, as they have burned some half dozen of our towns, and are now daily throwing shell into Charleston, Atlanta, and Petersburg. A letter to the Secretary from J. Thompson, in Canada (per Capt. Hines), was received to-day. He says the work will not probably begin before the middle of August., I know not what sort of work. But he says much caution is necessary. I suppose it to be the destruction of the Federal
en no guns heard to-day. August 18 Cloudy and pleasant. Still we have no authentic account of the details of the fights on the north side of the James River. We know we lost two brigadier-generals, and that we captured some 600 prisoners. Of the number killed and wounded on either side is all conjecture, although a semi-official statement makes our loss but light. Nevertheless, I happen to know that the President rode out yesterday, and remained until late in the night: for Mr. Craddock, his special detective (and formerly his messenger), whom he sent for to accompany him, assures me while on the field there was a flag of truce to bury the dead, and that the slaughter had been large. Our cavalry had suffered; but he thinks the enemy's infantry lost many more men than all our slain together. He says, moreover, that only one negro prisoner reached the city. The rest, thrust forward, being killed on the field in action, I suppose. At 2 P. M. a rumor began to be expan
Bragg telegraphs from Columbus, Ga., that Gen. Roddy has been ordered to reassemble his forces in North Alabama, to cut Sherman's communications. The news from Georgia is more cheering. The commissioners (of prices) have reduced the schedule with Early, but he was sick. The enemy's account of our loss in the battle before Atlanta is exaggerated greatly. Sherman's army is doomed, I think. Seven P. M. No rain here, but my family were drenched in a hard shower at Hanover Junctioen. Morgan is probably on a raid in Northwest Virginia and in Pennsylvania. Morgan proposed going into Georgia (rear of Sherman), but the Secretary indorsed that perhaps the matter had as well be left to Gen. Lee. The President quietly indorsed thown here. D. H. Maury, Major-General. Gen. Taylor will cross the Mississippi with 4000 on the 18th of this month. Sherman must get Atlanta quickly, or not at all. August 16 Warm and cloudy. There are movements of interest of the arm
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