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Wm T. Early (search for this): chapter 42
gested by a farmer in office. Gen. Lee writes that he had directed Morgan to co-operate with Early, but he was sick. The enemy's account of our loss in the battle before Atlanta is exaggeratelast Sunday, with loss of 400 men, 500 horses, and 4 pieces of artillery. A rumor prevails that Early has gained another victory near Winchester. No news yet from our agent sent to North Carolinesterday Gen. Hood said no important change had occurred, etc. I saw a soldier to-day from Gen. Early's army near Martinsburg, and the indications were that it was on the eve of crossing the Potomay before yesterday, 10th inst. He says Kershaw's division was at Culpepper C. H., 50 miles from Early. Detachments of troops are daily passing through the city, northward. All is quiet below on Pemberton lost more batteries; but it is only rumor, so far. Nor have we anything definite from Early or Hood. Bacon has fallen to $5 and $6 per pound, flour to $175 per barrel. I hope we shall
James A. Seddon (search for this): chapter 42
the Richmond. Guns were heard, and I suppose we made a demonstration both by land and water. Cavalry (Hampton's) still pass northward. They ride as if they grew to the horses. As they trot past, they can be seen cutting and dividing large round watermelons, and none are permitted to fall. Occasionally a staring negro in the street is astonished by the crushing of a rind on his head. I never saw melons and other fruit so abundant; but they are held so high I cannot indulge. Mr. Seddon draws 75 pounds rice per month, his family being fifty; and gets 12 pads cotton yarn from the State distribution. I shall get 10 pounds rice, at 50 cents-retail price, $2; and perhaps 1 pad-5 pounds-yarn for $45; my family being seven. August 15 Cloudy, damp, and pleasant. A rain fell last night, wetting the earth to a considerable depth; and the wind being southeast, we look for copious showers — a fine season for turnips, etc. Cannon was distinctly heard from my garden yester
Judah P. Benjamin (search for this): chapter 42
ugh Lee's cavalry corps is passing in the same direction-9 A. M. All this indicates a transferrence of the scene of operations nearer the enemy's country — the relief of Richmond — the failure of Grant's mad Bull campaign, prompted by President Lincoln, who is no general. Honor to Lee!-the savior of his country! and the noble band of heroes whom he has led to victory!-but first to God. August 8 Hot and dry. There are rumors of battles near Winchester and in Georgia. Mr. Benjamin writes the Secretary of War for a passport for --, who is going to New York, for our service. In the assault on the fortifications near Petersburg last week, it is said Hancock's (enemy's) corps lost half its men. Watermelons have sold at $20 each; corn, $10 per dozen ears; and everything else in the markets in proportion. My yellow tomatoes are just maturing. The dry weather has ruined nearly everything else in the garden. August 9 Very hot; very dry; very dusty. Th
nt and his staff have arrived, that half his army preceded him, and the remainder will soon follow. The campaign is considered a disastrous failure, and it is anticipated that henceforth the scene of operations is to be transferred from Richmond to Washington. They say President Lincoln's face expresses great terror, and affairs there are in a critical condition. A dispatch from Gen. Lee states that Gen. Bradley Johnson's brigade of cavalry was surprised and routed on the 7th inst. by Averill. He has directed that Gen. J. be relieved. A dispatch from Gen. Hood (Atlanta, Ga.) says no important change in affair has occurred since yesterday, except that Major- Gen..Bates is wounded. There are 5000 militia in the trenches. August 12 Hot and dry. At 3 P. M. rained about three minutes. We are burning up. There is no war news. A rumor in the street says Atlanta has fallen. I don't believe it. Yesterday Gen. Hood said no important change had occurred, etc. I saw a
odge the enemy from Deep Bottom, on this side of the river, and to select three or four batteries to render the navigation of the James River difficult and dangerous. Col. P. says he must have some 1500 cavalry, etc. Letters from Mr. McRae, our agent abroad, show that our finances and credit are improving wonderfully, and that the government will soon have a great many fine steamers running the blockade. Mr. McR. has contracted for eight steel-clad steamers with a single firm, Frazer, Trenholm & Co.-the latter now our Secretary of the Treasury. The President indorsed a cutting rebuke to both the Secretary of War and--Mr. (now Lieut.-Col.) Melton, A. A. General's office, to day. It was on an order for a quartermaster at Atlanta to report here and settle his accounts. Mr. M. had written on the order that it was issued by order of the President. The President said he was responsible for all orders issued by the War Department, but it was a great presumption of any officer in t
August 5th (search for this): chapter 42
he says much caution is necessary. I suppose it to be the destruction of the Federal army depots, etc. in the United States. Public meetings and the public press continue to denounce in unmeasured terms the high schedule of prices recently sanctioned by the Commissary and Quartermaster's bureaus. And, although the schedule has been modified, much odium will attach to all concerned in it. A large farmer, at the rates fixed for his products, would realize, perhaps, $200,000 per annum. August 5 Hot and dry. I hope there will be a rain-cloud this evening. No war news, except a letter from Gen. Lee, indicating that Gen. Morgan is probably on a raid in Northwest Virginia and in Pennsylvania. Morgan proposed going into Georgia (rear of Sherman), but the Secretary indorsed that perhaps the matter had as well be left to Gen. Lee. The President quietly indorsed that he concurred in the conclusion that all the movements of troops in Virginia had best be left to the discretion of
August 6th (search for this): chapter 42
t no important change has occurred in front of Atlanta. There was some skirmishing yesterday, and shell thrown into Atlanta. My daughter Anne, after ten months residence in the country, returned to-day (with Miss Randolph, of Loudon Co.) in perfect health. She brought apples, eggs, a watermelon, cucumbers, etc. Mr. Davies sold my reel (German silver) to-day for $75, or about $3.20 in gold-enough to buy a cord of wood. I parted with it reluctantly, as I hope to catch fish yet. August 6 Hot and dry. The booming of cannon heard yesterday evening was from one of our batteries below Drewry's Bluff. The enemy answered from their batteries, the existence of which we had no knowledge of before. No one was hurt. About the same time Gen. Beauregard sprung a mine under the enemy's mine, and blew it up, no doubt destroying many lives. This was succeeded by heavy, but, perhaps, harmless shelling along the lines. Another raiding party has been defeated and dispersed
August 3rd (search for this): chapter 42
es, $30 per bushel for wheat, and $50 for bacon, were suggested by a farmer in office. Gen. Lee writes that he had directed Morgan to co-operate with Early, but he was sick. The enemy's account of our loss in the battle before Atlanta is exaggerated greatly. Sherman's army is doomed, I think. Seven P. M. No rain here, but my family were drenched in a hard shower at Hanover Junction, and what was worse, they got no blackberries, the hot sun having dried the sap in the bushes. August 3 Cloudy, but no rain. The press dispatches last night assert that still another raiding party, besides Stoneman's, was dispersed or captured. It is rumored to-day that Beauregard has sprung a mine under Grant's fortifications. This may be so. Later. It was not so. August 4 Clear and hot. All quiet at Petersburg. President Lincoln was at Fortress Monroe on Sunday last, after the explosion and its failure. The Northern papers acknowledge that Grant sustained a terr
August 4th (search for this): chapter 42
ed, I think. Seven P. M. No rain here, but my family were drenched in a hard shower at Hanover Junction, and what was worse, they got no blackberries, the hot sun having dried the sap in the bushes. August 3 Cloudy, but no rain. The press dispatches last night assert that still another raiding party, besides Stoneman's, was dispersed or captured. It is rumored to-day that Beauregard has sprung a mine under Grant's fortifications. This may be so. Later. It was not so. August 4 Clear and hot. All quiet at Petersburg. President Lincoln was at Fortress Monroe on Sunday last, after the explosion and its failure. The Northern papers acknowledge that Grant sustained a terrible disaster at Petersburg, losing in killed, wounded, and missing 5000. They say the negro troops caused the failure, by running back and breaking the lines of the whites. The blacks were pushed forward in front, and suffered most. From the same source we learn that our troops have
August 9th (search for this): chapter 42
les near Winchester and in Georgia. Mr. Benjamin writes the Secretary of War for a passport for --, who is going to New York, for our service. In the assault on the fortifications near Petersburg last week, it is said Hancock's (enemy's) corps lost half its men. Watermelons have sold at $20 each; corn, $10 per dozen ears; and everything else in the markets in proportion. My yellow tomatoes are just maturing. The dry weather has ruined nearly everything else in the garden. August 9 Very hot; very dry; very dusty. The President has directed the late Gen. (now Lieut.--Col.) Pemberton to organize a mortar and cavalry force to dislodge the enemy from Deep Bottom, on this side of the river, and to select three or four batteries to render the navigation of the James River difficult and dangerous. Col. P. says he must have some 1500 cavalry, etc. Letters from Mr. McRae, our agent abroad, show that our finances and credit are improving wonderfully, and that the go
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