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arlotte, N. C., says the fire there destroyed 70,000 bushels of grain, a large amount of sugar, molasses, clothing, blankets, etc. He knows not whether it was the result of design or accident. All his papers were consumed. A part of Conner's brigade on the way to South Carolina, 500 men, under Lieut.-Col. Wallace, refused to aid in saving property, but plundered it! This proves that the soldiers were all poor men, the rich having bought exemptions or details! Gen. Lee writes on the 8th instant, that the troops sailing out of James River are, he thinks, destined for another attack on Wilmington. But none have left the lines in front of him, etc. Gen. Lee also writes on the 9th instant, that the commissary agents have established a large traffic through our lines, in North Carolina, for supplies; and he desires the press to say nothing on the subject. Mr. Ould, to whom it appears the Secretary has written for his opinion (he was editor once, and fought a duel with Jennin
is papers were consumed. A part of Conner's brigade on the way to South Carolina, 500 men, under Lieut.-Col. Wallace, refused to aid in saving property, but plundered it! This proves that the soldiers were all poor men, the rich having bought exemptions or details! Gen. Lee writes on the 8th instant, that the troops sailing out of James River are, he thinks, destined for another attack on Wilmington. But none have left the lines in front of him, etc. Gen. Lee also writes on the 9th instant, that the commissary agents have established a large traffic through our lines, in North Carolina, for supplies; and he desires the press to say nothing on the subject. Mr. Ould, to whom it appears the Secretary has written for his opinion (he was editor once, and fought a duel with Jennings Wise, Mr. Seddon being his second), gives a very bad one on the condition of affairs. He says the people have confidence in Mr. Seddon, but not in President Davis, and a strong reconstruction pa
other article calling for a convention to abolish the Constitution and remove President Davis. Mr. Seward, United States Secretary of State, escorted Mrs. Foote to her hotel, upon her arrival in Washington. The following official telegram was received at the War Department last night: headquarters, January 15th, 1865. Hon. J. A. Seddon. Gen. Early reports that Gen. Rosser, at the head of three hundred men, surprised and captured the garrison at Beverly, Randolph County, on the 11th instant, killing and wounding a considerable number and taking five hundred and eighty prisoners. His loss slight. R. E. Lee. January 18 Cloudy and cool. Cannon heard down the river. No war news. But blockade-running at Wilmington has ceased; and common calico, now at $25 per yard, will soon be $50. The stupor in official circles continues, and seems likely to continue. A secret detective told the Assistant Secretary, yesterday, that a certain member of Congress was utter
oon would his great popularity vanish like the mist of the morning! Can it be possible that he has influenced the President's mind on this subject? Did he influence the mind of his father-in-law, G. W. Park Custis, to emancipate his hundreds of slaves? Gen. Lee would have been heir to all, as his wife was an only child. There's some mistake about it. The Secretary of State (still there!) informs the Secretary of War (still here!) that the gold he wrote about to the President on the 18th inst. for Gen. Hardee and for Mr. Conrad, is ready and subject to his order. Four steamers have run into Charleston with a large amount of commissary stores. This is providential. January 26 Clear and cold. No further news from the iron-clad fleet that went down the river. Beef is selling at $8 per pound this morning; wood at $150 per cord. Major Maynard, instead of bringing 120, gets in but 30 or 40 cords per day. I am out of wood, and must do my little cooking in the parlor w
January 1st (search for this): chapter 47
n Richmonhd. arrest of Hon. H. S. Foote. fall of Fort Fisher. views of Gen. Cobb. dismal. casualties of the War. peace commissioners for Washington. Sunday, January 1 Snowed a few inches in depth during the night-clear and cool morning. The new year begins with the new rumor that Gen. Hood has turned upon Gen. Thomas avidently. Gen. Withers, Alabama, denounces the inefficiency of the conscript system. Lieut. Beverly Kermon writes from the Rappahannock that thus far (to Jan. 1st) our movements (in connection with Capt. T. N. Conrad) are perfectly secret. The next day he was to go to the Potomac. What has the Secretary sent him there fo clerks think the money has been retained for speculative purposes. It remains to be seen whether the President will do anything in the premises. The grand New Year's dinner to the soldiers, as I supposed, has produced discontent in the army, from unequal distribution, etc. No doubt the speculators got control of it, and mad
January 2nd (search for this): chapter 47
he slaves will certainly be lost. Thus we begin the new year-Heaven only knows how we shall end it! I trust we may be in a better condition then. Of one thing I am certain, the people are capable of achieving independence, if they only had capable men in all departments of the government. The President was at St. Paul's to-day, with a knit woolen cap on his head. Dr. Minnegerode preached a sermon against the croakers. His son has been appointed a midshipman by the President. January 2 Cold, and indications of snow. Offered the owner of our servant $400 per annum. He wants $150 and clothing for her. Clothing would cost perhaps $1000. It remains in abeyance. Saw Gen. Wise dancing attendance in the Secretary's room. He looks seasoned and well, and may be destined to play a leading part in human affairs yet, notwithstanding his hands have been so long bound by those who contrive to get possession. It is this very thing of keeping our great men in the backgroun
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 47
defense. The salaries of the clergymen have been raised by their congregations to $10,000 and $12,000. I hear that Dr. Woodbridge received a Christmas gift from his people of upwards of $4000, besides seven barrels of flour, etc. He owns his own house, his own servants, stocks, etc. Most of these fortunate ministers are natives of the North, but true to the Southern cause, so far as we know. God knows I am glad to hear of any one, and especially a minister, being made comfortable. January 3 Calm and quiet; indications of snow. By a communication sent to Congress, by the President, it is ascertained that 500,000 pairs shoes, 8,000,000 pounds bacon, 2,000,000 pounds saltpeter, 50 cannon, etc. etc., have been imported since Octoberr 1st, 1864. When the enemy's fleet threatened Wilmington, the brokers here (who have bribed the conscript officers) bought up all the coffee and sugar in the city. They raised the price of the former from $15 to $45 per pound, and the lat
January 4th (search for this): chapter 47
composed of the most treacherous and bottomless quicksands. The whole coast is scarcely equaled in the world for danger and fearful appearance, particularly when a strong easterly wind meets the ebb tide. It is an easy matter for a good pilot to run a vessel directly out to sea or into port; but in the stormy months, from October to April, no blockading vessel can lie at anchor in safety off the Carolina Coast. Therefore supplies will be brought in despite the keenest vigilance. January 4 Bright, but several inches of snow fell last night. The President wrote a long letter to the Secretary yesterday concerning the assignment of conscripts in Western North Carolina, at most only a few hundred, and the appointment of officers, etc. A small subject. Congress has passed a resolution calling on the Secretary of War for information concerning certain youths, alleged to have received passports to Europe, etc. Also one relating to the Commissary-General's traffic in Eas
January 5th (search for this): chapter 47
efficiency of the conscript system. Lieut. Beverly Kermon writes from the Rappahannock that thus far (to Jan. 1st) our movements (in connection with Capt. T. N. Conrad) are perfectly secret. The next day he was to go to the Potomac. What has the Secretary sent him there for? J. R. Bledsoe presents a design for a new flag, red, white, and blue cross, which Gen. Lee thinks both original and beautiful. Judge Campbell has a box of clothing, sent from London by J. B. Bloodgood. January 5 Clear and cold. It is understood now that Gen. Hood has crossed to the south side of the Tennessee River with the debris of his army. Gen. Butler has returned to Virginia from his fruitless North Carolina expedition. It is supposed we shall have active operations again before this city as soon as the weather and roads will permit. But it really does seem that the States respectively mean to take control of all their men not now in the Confederate States armies, and I appre
January 6th (search for this): chapter 47
n as between tweedledum and tweedledee. The prisoners of war (foreigners) that took the oath of allegiance and enlisted in the Confederate States service, are deserting back to the Federal service, under Gen. Sherman's promise of amnesty. January 6 Cloudy and thawing. No war news,--but it is known Sherman's army is not quiet, and must soon be heard from in spite of the interdict of the government. It is said Mr. Trenholm, Secretary of the Treasury, is in the market buying gold,d for their own use; exemptions, details, etc. If he were disposed, he could realize a million of dollars. It is said the Hon. A. R. Wright went North to get his son paroled, who is in prison there. Judge Campbell talks of resigning. January 6 Rained yesterday and last night. Clear and windy to-day. It is said the Blairs (who have been looked for on some sort of mission) turned back after arriving iq the camp of Gen. Grant. Of course they could not treat with this government
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