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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
in some way, the nickname of Old Solitude. Soon after the formation of Taylor's cabinet, Webster and Ewing happened to meet at an evening party. As they approached each other, Webster, who was in fine spirits, uttered, in his deepest bass tones, the wellknown lines,-- O Solitude, where are the charms That sages have seen in thy face? The evening of Tuesday I dined with Mr. Chase, the Secretary of the Treasury, of whom I painted a portrait in 1855, upon the close of his term as United States Senator. He said during the dinner, that, shortly after the dedication of the cemetery at Gettysburg, the President told this story at a cabinet meeting. Thad. Stevens was asked by some one, the morning of the day appointed for that ceremony, where the President and Mr. Seward were going. To Gettysburg, was the reply. But where are Stanton and Chase? continued the questioner. At home, at work, was the surly answer; let the dead bury the dead. This was some months previous to the
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ening of Tuesday I dined with Mr. Chase, the Secretary of the Treasury, of whom I painted a portrait in 1855, upon the close of his term as United States Senator. He said during the dinner, that, shortly after the dedication of the cemetery at Gettysburg, the President told this story at a cabinet meeting. Thad. Stevens was asked by some one, the morning of the day appointed for that ceremony, where the President and Mr. Seward were going. To Gettysburg, was the reply. But where are Stanton Gettysburg, was the reply. But where are Stanton and Chase? continued the questioner. At home, at work, was the surly answer; let the dead bury the dead. This was some months previous to the Baltimore Convention, when it was thought by some of the leaders of the party, that Mr. Lincoln's chances for a re-nomination were somewhat dubious. Levee night occurring weekly, during the regular season, was always a trying one to the President. Whenever sympathy was expressed for him, however, he would turn it off playfully, asserting that the
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
to high positions in a democratic government — the tribute those filling them were compelled to pay to the public. Great men, said Mr. Lincoln, have various estimates. When Daniel Webster made his tour through the West years ago, he visited Springfield among other places, where great preparations had been made to receive him. As the procession was going through the town, a barefooted little darkey boy pulled the sleeve of a man named T., and asked,--What the folks were all doing down the street? Why, Jack, was the reply, the biggest man in the world is coming. Now, there lived in Springfield a man by the name of G.,--a very corpulent man, Jack darted off down the street, but presently returned, with a very disappointed air. Well, did you see him? inquired T. Yees, returned Jack; but laws — he ain't half as big as old G. Shortly afterward, he spoke of Mr. Ewing, who was in both President Harrison's and President Taylor's cabinet. Those men, said he, were, you know, when ele
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 14
e should henceforth have nothing to do with the Rebels. Mr. Lincoln sat quietly through the story, his face in half shadow.always opposed to his joining them. Your word, rejoined Mr. Lincoln dryly, what do I know about your word? He finally took , one of the gentlemen claimed to be an acquaintance of Mrs. Lincoln; this, however, received but little attention, and the . Oh, said she, he was a captain. A captain! rejoined Mr. Lincoln, indeed!--rather too big a fish to set free simply upon riend reiterated the assertion of his acquaintance with Mrs. Lincoln. Instantly the President's hand was upon the bell-ropeswered the summons. Cornelius, take this man's name to Mrs. Lincoln, and ask her what she knows of him. The boy presently ospital chaplains, and he greatly desired such a place. Mr. Lincoln replied rather curtly, that he could do nothing for him.carelessly tossed aside, never to be thought of again by Mr. Lincoln. Subsequently the sermon fell into my hands. The on
hat position the lady's husband held in the Rebel service. Oh, said she, he was a captain. A captain! rejoined Mr. Lincoln, indeed!--rather too big a fish to set free simply upon his taking the oath. If he was an officer, it is proof positive that he has been a zealous rebel; I cannot release him. Here the lady's friend reiterated the assertion of his acquaintance with Mrs. Lincoln. Instantly the President's hand was upon the bell-rope. The usher in attendance answered the summons. Cornelius, take this man's name to Mrs. Lincoln, and ask her what she knows of him. The boy presently returned, with the reply that the Madam (as she was called by the servants) knew nothing of him whatever. The man said it was very strange. Well, it is just as I suspected, said the President. The party made one more attempt to enlist his sympathy, but without effect. It is of no use, was the reply; I cannot release him; and the trio withdrew, the lady in high displeasure. Next came a Metho
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ntinued examination of the court-martial cases, to the great vexation of a score of political applicants, whom I could hear impatiently pacing the floor of the hall and waiting-room. At one o'clock, however, the doors were thrown open, and the throng admitted and dismissed, as rapidly as possible. I was much amused and interested, later in the day, in a variety of characters who presented themselves. First was an elderly lady, plainly but comfortably dressed, whose son was a prisoner in Baltimore. Her story, spun out to some length, was briefly this: Her son had been serving in the Rebel army. He heard that his sister was lying dead at home, and his mother at the supposed point of death. He determined to see them, and succeeded in getting through our lines undiscovered. He found his mother better. Before he got ready to return, he became very ill himself. She said she hid him in the house until he recovered, and on his way back to his regiment he was captured. He was now anx
Abe Lincoln (search for this): chapter 15
d, would soon die. Promising the father that I would bear the case in mind, I improved an opportunity, as soon as I felt sure of having found favor with the President, to speak to him about it, I believe it was on the private staircase, that, meeting him one evening, I ventured to introduce the subject. I assured him of the entire good faith and loyalty of both father and son. Of course he had never heard of the case before. Considering the subject a moment, he said, Come up-stairs by-and-by, and I guess we can fix it up. An hour later I entered his room, and gave him very briefly the particulars of the case reading one or two letters from the young man to his father. That will do, said the President, putting on his spectacles, and taking the letter out of my hand, he turned it over and wrote on the back of it, Release this man upon his taking the oath. A. Lincoln. There, said he, you can take that over to the War Department yourself, if you choose. You will find it all right.
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
rs, some of whom would linger in the anteroom day after day, waiting admission. The incidents of no two days could of course be alike. I shall never cease to regret that an additional private secretary could not have been appointed, whose exclusive duty it should have been to look after and keep a record of all cases appealing to executive clemency. It would have afforded full employment for one man, at least; and such a volume would now be beyond all price. Just before leaving for Washington, I met a brother artist, who, upon learning of my proposed purpose, laid before me the details of an interesting case, concerning his only son, begging me to bring the circumstances to the President's knowledge. When the war broke out the young man in question was living at the South. Eventually driven into the Rebel service, he was improving his first opportunity to go over to the Union lines, when he was taken prisoner. His story was disbelieved, and he had been in prison for more tha
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Xiv. The examples given of the observations of two days, are fair illustrations of the usual White House routine, varied of course by official or diplomatic business, and a greater or less pressure of visitors, some of whom would linger in the anteroom day after day, waiting admission. The incidents of no two days could of course be alike. I shall never cease to regret that an additional private secretary could not have been appointed, whose exclusive duty it should have been to look after and keep a record of all cases appealing to executive clemency. It would have afforded full employment for one man, at least; and such a volume would now be beyond all price. Just before leaving for Washington, I met a brother artist, who, upon learning of my proposed purpose, laid before me the details of an interesting case, concerning his only son, begging me to bring the circumstances to the President's knowledge. When the war broke out the young man in question was living at the S
Alton (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
er artist, who, upon learning of my proposed purpose, laid before me the details of an interesting case, concerning his only son, begging me to bring the circumstances to the President's knowledge. When the war broke out the young man in question was living at the South. Eventually driven into the Rebel service, he was improving his first opportunity to go over to the Union lines, when he was taken prisoner. His story was disbelieved, and he had been in prison for more than a year at Alton, Illinois. His father had spent many months in the endeavor to have him released, without success. So many formalities and technicalities were in the way that he became completely discouraged, and appealed to me as his last hope. The boy was very ill, and he feared if not speedily released, would soon die. Promising the father that I would bear the case in mind, I improved an opportunity, as soon as I felt sure of having found favor with the President, to speak to him about it, I believe it w
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