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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 78
much. I replied, referring to some stalwart denunciations he had just been uttering of the demoralizing influences of Washington upon Northern politicians in respect to the slavery question, Mr. Lincoln, may I say one thing to you before we separate? Certainly, anything you please. You have just spoken of the tendency of political life in Washington to debase the moral convictions of our representatives there by the admixture of considerations of mere political expediency. You have bemembered it in those dark days when McClellan, Nero-like, was fiddling on James River, and Pope was being routed before Washington, and the report came that a prominent Cabinet Minister had boasted that he had succeeded in preventing the issue of theus: but every man has his faults, and still I say: Amen to Abraham Lincoln! This article was written and first published some months previous to Mr. Lincoln's reelection, during the depression of the public mind following the raid on Washington.
Meriden (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
rse of lectures on Rhetoric. Ah! That reminds me, said he, of a most extraordinary circumstance which occurred in New Haven the other day. They told me that the Professor of Rhetoric in Yale College,--a very learned man, isn't he? Yes, sir, and a fine critic too. Well, I suppose so; he ought to be, at any rate,--they told me that he came to hear me, and took notes of my speech, and gave a lecture on it to his class the next day; and, not satisfied with that, he followed me up to Meriden the next evening, and heard me again for the same purpose. Now, if this is so, it is to my mind very extraordinary. I have been sufficiently astonished at my success in the West. It has been most unexpected. But I had no thought of any marked success at the East, and least of all that I should draw out such commendations from literary and learned men. Now, he continued, I should like very much to know what it was in my speech you thought so remarkable, and what you suppose interested m
Norwich (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
No reminiscence of the late President has been given to the public more thoroughly valuable and characteristic than a sketch which appeared in the New York Independent of September 1st, 1864, from the pen of the Rev. J. P. Gulliver, of Norwich, Connecticut:-- It was just after his controversy with Douglas, and some months before the meeting of the Chicago Convention of 1860, that Mr. Lincoln came to Norwich to make a political speech. It was in substance the famous speech delivered inNorwich to make a political speech. It was in substance the famous speech delivered in New York, commencing with the noble words: There is but one political question before the people of this country, which is this, Is slavery right, or is it wrong? and ending with the yet nobler words: Gentlemen, it has been said of the world's history hitherto that “might makes right;” it is for us and for our times to reverse the maxim, and to show that right makes might! The next morning I met him at the railroad station, where he was conversing with our Mayor, every few minutes looking
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
rength,--always ready, always available, never capricious,--the highest possession of the human intellect. But, let me ask, did you prepare for your profession? Oh, yes! I read law, as the phrase is; that is, I became a lawyer's clerk in Springfield, and copied tedious documents, and picked up what I could of law in the intervals of other work. But your question reminds me of a bit of education I had, which I am bound in honesty to mention. In the course of my law-reading, I constantly books of reference I could find, but with no better results. You might as well have defined blue to a blind man. At last I said, Lincoln, you can never make a lawyer if you do not understand what demonstrate means; and I left my situation in Springfield, went home to my father's house, and stayed there till I could give any proposition in the six books of Euclid at sight. I then found out what demonstrate means, and went back to my law-studies. I could not refrain from saying, in my admir
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 78
ent that a ray had darted down to the bottom of Abraham Lincoln's heart, and that I could see the whole. It seemed to me as beautiful as that emerald pool, and as pure. I have never forgotten that glimpse. When the strange revocation came of the most rational and reasonable proclamation of Fremont,-- The slaves of Rebels shall be set free, --I remembered that hearty Amen, and stifled my rising apprehensions. I remembered it in those dark days when McClellan, Nero-like, was fiddling on James River, and Pope was being routed before Washington, and the report came that a prominent Cabinet Minister had boasted that he had succeeded in preventing the issue of the Emancipation Proclamation; I said: Abraham Lincoln will prove true yet. And he has! God bless him! he has. Slow, if you please, but true. Unimpassioned, if you please, but true. Jocose, trifling, if you please, but true. Reluctant to part with unworthy official advisers, but true himself--true as steel! I could wish him les
bosom of the mountain. But occasionally the noon-day sun darts through it a vertical ray which penetrates to its very bottom, and shows every configuration of the varied interior. I felt at that moment that a ray had darted down to the bottom of Abraham Lincoln's heart, and that I could see the whole. It seemed to me as beautiful as that emerald pool, and as pure. I have never forgotten that glimpse. When the strange revocation came of the most rational and reasonable proclamation of Fremont,-- The slaves of Rebels shall be set free, --I remembered that hearty Amen, and stifled my rising apprehensions. I remembered it in those dark days when McClellan, Nero-like, was fiddling on James River, and Pope was being routed before Washington, and the report came that a prominent Cabinet Minister had boasted that he had succeeded in preventing the issue of the Emancipation Proclamation; I said: Abraham Lincoln will prove true yet. And he has! God bless him! he has. Slow, if you plea
I could not sleep, though I often tried to, when I got on such a hunt after an idea, until I had caught it; and when I thought I had got it, I was not satisfied until I had repeated it over and over, until I had put it in language plain enough, as I thought, for any boy I knew to comprehend. This was a kind of passion with me, and it has stuck by me; for I am never easy now, when I am handling a thought, till I have bounded it North, and bounded it South, and bounded it East, and bounded it West. Perhaps that accounts for the characteristic you observe in my speeches, though I never put the two things together before. Mr. Lincoln, I thank you for this. It is the most splendid educational fact I ever happened upon. This is genius, with all its impulsive, inspiring, dominating power over the mind of its possessor, developed by education into talent, with its uniformity, its permanence, and its disciplined strength,--always ready, always available, never capricious,--the highest
y had darted down to the bottom of Abraham Lincoln's heart, and that I could see the whole. It seemed to me as beautiful as that emerald pool, and as pure. I have never forgotten that glimpse. When the strange revocation came of the most rational and reasonable proclamation of Fremont,-- The slaves of Rebels shall be set free, --I remembered that hearty Amen, and stifled my rising apprehensions. I remembered it in those dark days when McClellan, Nero-like, was fiddling on James River, and Pope was being routed before Washington, and the report came that a prominent Cabinet Minister had boasted that he had succeeded in preventing the issue of the Emancipation Proclamation; I said: Abraham Lincoln will prove true yet. And he has! God bless him! he has. Slow, if you please, but true. Unimpassioned, if you please, but true. Jocose, trifling, if you please, but true. Reluctant to part with unworthy official advisers, but true himself--true as steel! I could wish him less a man of fac
Robert Lincoln (search for this): chapter 78
ing of the Chicago Convention of 1860, that Mr. Lincoln came to Norwich to make a political speech.speech just now? I meant every word of it, Mr. Lincoln. Why, an old dyedin-the-wool Democrat, whomuch. The clearness of your statements, Mr. Lincoln; the unanswerable style of your reasoning, of my limited education. That suggests, Mr. Lincoln, an inquiry which has several times been upver put the two things together before. Mr. Lincoln, I thank you for this. It is the most sple defined blue to a blind man. At last I said, Lincoln, you can never make a lawyer if you do not unvelopment of character and genius combined: Mr. Lincoln, your success is no longer a marvel. It isDouglas. Being a little curious to see how Mr. Lincoln would meet him, I introduced him after this fashion:-- Mr. Lincoln, allow me to introduce Mr. L-, a very particular friend of your particular ticians in respect to the slavery question, Mr. Lincoln, may I say one thing to you before we separ[2 more...]
J. P. Gulliver (search for this): chapter 78
Lxxvii. No reminiscence of the late President has been given to the public more thoroughly valuable and characteristic than a sketch which appeared in the New York Independent of September 1st, 1864, from the pen of the Rev. J. P. Gulliver, of Norwich, Connecticut:-- It was just after his controversy with Douglas, and some months before the meeting of the Chicago Convention of 1860, that Mr. Lincoln came to Norwich to make a political speech. It was in substance the famous speech delivered in New York, commencing with the noble words: There is but one political question before the people of this country, which is this, Is slavery right, or is it wrong? and ending with the yet nobler words: Gentlemen, it has been said of the world's history hitherto that “might makes right;” it is for us and for our times to reverse the maxim, and to show that right makes might! The next morning I met him at the railroad station, where he was conversing with our Mayor, every few minute
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