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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House. Search the whole document.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 81
22d of July, the President and Cabinet, at the close of the regular session, adjourned in a body to the State Dining-room, to view the work, at last in a condition to receive criticism. Sitting in the midst of the group, the President expressed his unschooled opinion, as he called it, of the result, in terms which could not but have afforded the deepest gratification to any artist. The curiosity of the public to see the picture was so great that during the last two days of my stay in Washington, by the kind permission of the President, it was placed in the East Room, and thrown open to the public. During this time the house was thronged with visitors, the porters estimating their number each day at several thousands. Towards the close of the second day's exhibition, intending to have the canvas taken down and rolled up during the night for transportation to New York, I watched for an opportunity to say a last word to Mr. Lincoln previous to his leaving for the Soldiers' Home
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 81
citor Whiting's work on the War Powers of the President, and as Emancipation was the result in fact of a military necessity, the book seemed to me just the thing to go in there; so I simply changed the title, leaving the old sheepskin cover as it was. Now, said he, Whiting's book is not a regular law-book. It is all very well that it should be there; but I would suggest that as you have changed the title, you change also the character of the binding. It now looks like an old volume of United States Statutes. I thanked him for this criticism, and then said: Is there anything else that you would like changed or added? No, he replied, and then repeated very emphatically the expression he used when the design was first sketched upon the canvas: It is as good as it can be made. I then referred at some length, to the enthusiasm in which the picture was conceived and had been executed, concluding with an expression of my profound appreciation of the very unusual opportunities afford
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 81
Lxxx. At the end of six months incessant labor, my task at the White House drew near completion. On the 22d of July, the President and Cabinet, at the close of the regular session, adjourned in a body to the State Dining-room, to view the work, at last in a condition to receive criticism. Sitting in the midst of the group, the President expressed his unschooled opinion, as he called it, of the result, in terms which could not but have afforded the deepest gratification to any artist. The curiosity of the public to see the picture was so great that during the last two days of my stay in Washington, by the kind permission of the President, it was placed in the East Room, and thrown open to the public. During this time the house was thronged with visitors, the porters estimating their number each day at several thousands. Towards the close of the second day's exhibition, intending to have the canvas taken down and rolled up during the night for transportation to New York,
all; but the book in the corner, leaning against the chair-leg,--you have changed the title of that, I see. Yes, I replied; at the last moment I learned that you frequently consulted, during the period you were preparing the Proclamation, Solicitor Whiting's work on the War Powers of the President, and as Emancipation was the result in fact of a military necessity, the book seemed to me just the thing to go in there; so I simply changed the title, leaving the old sheepskin cover as it was. Now, said he, Whiting's book is not a regular law-book. It is all very well that it should be there; but I would suggest that as you have changed the title, you change also the character of the binding. It now looks like an old volume of United States Statutes. I thanked him for this criticism, and then said: Is there anything else that you would like changed or added? No, he replied, and then repeated very emphatically the expression he used when the design was first sketched upon the canv
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 81
ition, intending to have the canvas taken down and rolled up during the night for transportation to New York, I watched for an opportunity to say a last word to Mr. Lincoln previous to his leaving for the Soldiers' Home, where the family were then staying. At four o'clock the carriage drove up to the door, accompanied by the Blacksident's side. He said very little to the man, but was intently studying the expression of his face while he was narrating his trouble. When he had finished, Mr. Lincoln said to him, Have you a blank card? The man searched his pockets, but finding none, a gentleman standing near, who had overheard the question, came forward and said, Here is one, Mr. President. Several persons had in the mean time gathered around. Taking the card and a pencil, Mr. Lincoln sat down upon the low stone coping, presenting almost the appearance of sitting upon the pavement itself, and wrote an order upon the card to the proper official to examine this man's case. While writ
Lxxx. At the end of six months incessant labor, my task at the White House drew near completion. On the 22d of July, the President and Cabinet, at the close of the regular session, adjourned in a body to the State Dining-room, to view the work, at last in a condition to receive criticism. Sitting in the midst of the group, the President expressed his unschooled opinion, as he called it, of the result, in terms which could not but have afforded the deepest gratification to any artist. The curiosity of the public to see the picture was so great that during the last two days of my stay in Washington, by the kind permission of the President, it was placed in the East Room, and thrown open to the public. During this time the house was thronged with visitors, the porters estimating their number each day at several thousands. Towards the close of the second day's exhibition, intending to have the canvas taken down and rolled up during the night for transportation to New York,