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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Martin Buren (search for this): chapter 10
se. the reconciliation. the marriage. the duel with James Shields. the Rebecca letters.--Cathleen invokes the muse. Whiteside's account of the duel. Merryman's account. Lincoln's address before the Washingtonian society. meeting with Martin Van Buren. partnership with Stephen T. Logan. partnership with William H. Herndon. Congressional aspirations nomination and election of John J. Hardin. the Presidential campaign of 1844. Lincoln takes the stump in Southern Indiana. Lincoln nomiin any case that happened to come into his hands. His propensity for the narration of an apt story was of immeasurable aid to him before a jury, and in cases where the law seemed to lean towards the other side won him many a case. In 1842, Martin Van Buren, who had just left the Presidential chair, made a journey through the West. He was accompanied by his former Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Paulding, and in June they reached the village of Rochester, distant from Springfield six miles. It was
others, they prevailed on Lincoln, although an ardent and pronounced Whig, to accompany them. They introduced him to the venerable statesman of Kinderhook as a representative lawyer, and a man whose wit was as ready as his store of anecdotes was exhaustless. How he succeeded in entertaining the visitor and the company, those who were present have often since testified. Van Buren himself entertained the crowd with reminiscences of politics in New York, going back to the days of Hamilton and Burr, and many of the crowd in turn interested him with graphic descriptions of early life on the western frontier. But they all yielded at last to the piquancy and force of Lincoln's queer stories. Of these, relates one of the company, Jos. Gillespie, Ms. letter, September 6. 1866. there was a constant supply, one following another in rapid succession, each more irresistible than its predecessor. The fun continued until after midnight, and until the distinguished traveller insisted that hi
William Butler (search for this): chapter 10
challenge from the belligerent Shields to William Butler, and another from General Whitesides to Drthat Sarah Rickard, who was a sister of Mrs. William Butler, had been the recipient of some attentiincoln, to wit, Messrs. Merryman, Bledsoe, and Butler, made a full and satisfactory explanation in r from Mr. Shields; but after conferring with Mr. Butler for a long time, say two or three hours, retThis was in consequence of an assurance from Mr. Butler that Mr. Lincoln could not receive any commuthdrawal of his first note, or a challenge. Mr. Butler further stated to General Whiteside, that, od and presented Mr. Lincoln the same note as Mr. Butler says he had brought on Saturday evening. It tructions for my guide, on a suggestion from Mr. Butler that he had reason to believe that an attempcity. Day before yesterday Shields challenged Butler, who accepted, proposed fighting next morning mpaign paper here is proclaiming that Cass and Butler are of the Hickory stripe. No, sir, you dare [2 more...]
Louis Candler (search for this): chapter 10
ver clear may have been its reasoning, however rich in illustration, in restrained and burning earnestness, yet was unsuccessful in smoking out the President. He remained within the official seclusion his position gave him, and declined to answer. In fact it is doubtless true that Lincoln anticipated no response, but simply took that means of defining clearly his own position. On the 19th inst., having occasion to write me with reference to a note with which one of our clients, one Louis Candler, had been annoying him, not the least of which annoyance, he complains, is his cursed unreadable and ungodly handwriting, he adds a line, in which with noticeable modesty he informs me: I have made a speech, a copy of which I send you by mail. He doubtless felt he was taking rather advanced and perhaps questionable ground. And so he was, for very soon after, murmurs of dissatisfaction began to run through the Whig ranks. I did not, as some of Lincoln's biographers would have their rea
discover some danger of loss, and be off about the time it came to taking their places? And suppose the people attempt to suspend, by refusing to pay; what then? The collectors would just jerk up their horses and cows, and the like, and sell them to the highest bidder for silver in hand, without valuation or redemption. Why, Shields didn't believe that story himself: it was never meant for the truth. If it was true, why was it not writ till five days after the proclamation? Why didn't Carlin and Carpenter sign it as well as Shields? Answer me that, Aunt ‘Becca. I say it's a lie, and not a well told one at that. It grins out like a copper dollar; Shields is a fool as well as a liar. With him truth is out of the question; and as for getting a good, bright, passable lie out of him, you might as well try to strike fire from a cake of tallow. I stick to it, it's all an infernal Whig lie! A Whig lie! Highty tighty! Yes, a Whig lie; and it's just like everything the cursed
urts my feelings. Beg pardon, Aunt ‘Becca, says he; but I do say it's enough to make Dr. Goddard swear, to have tax to pay in silver, for nothing only that Ford may get his two thousand a year, and Shields his twenty-four hundred a year, and Carpenter his sixteen hundred a year, and all without danger of loss by taking it in State paper. Yes, yes: it's plain enough now what these officers of State mean by danger of loss. Wash, I s'pose, actually lost fifteen hundred dollars out of the threst bidder for silver in hand, without valuation or redemption. Why, Shields didn't believe that story himself: it was never meant for the truth. If it was true, why was it not writ till five days after the proclamation? Why didn't Carlin and Carpenter sign it as well as Shields? Answer me that, Aunt ‘Becca. I say it's a lie, and not a well told one at that. It grins out like a copper dollar; Shields is a fool as well as a liar. With him truth is out of the question; and as for getting a
Peter Cartwright (search for this): chapter 10
in Southern Indiana. Lincoln nominated for Congress. the canvass against Peter Cartwright. Lincoln elected. in Congress. the spot resolutions. Opposes the Mexeed not be told whom the Democrats placed in the field against him. It was Peter Cartwright, the famous Methodist divine and circuit rider. An energetic canvass of tre of business in the law office entirely. He had a formidable competitor in Cartwright, who not only had an extensive following by reason of his church influence, bg which operated much to Lincoln's disadvantage was the report circulated by Cartwright's friends with respect to Lincoln's religious views. He was charged with thetoo, played its part; but all these opposing circumstances were of no avail. Cartwright was personally very popular, but it was plain the people of the Springfield dte separation of Church and State. The election, therefore, of such a man as Cartwright would not, to their way of thinking, tend to promote such a result. I was en
effective. The speech in the main is an arraignment of General Cass, the Democratic candidate for President, who had alread; and even now your campaign paper here is proclaiming that Cass and Butler are of the Hickory stripe. No, sir, you dare noas fought I suppose it is a just conclusion with you to say Cass was aiding Harrison to pick whortleberries. This is about k Hawk war, I fought, bled, and came away. Speaking of General Cass's career, reminds me of my own. I was not at Stillman's defeat, but I was about as near it as Cass was to Hull's surrender; and, like him, I saw the place very soon afterward. Iteak, but I bent my musket pretty badly on one occasion. If Cass broke his sword, the idea is, he broke it in desparation; I bent the musket by accident. If General Cass went in advance of me picking whortleberries, I guess I surpassed him in chartest that they shall not make fun of me as they have of General Cass by attempting to write me into a military hero. Aft
Harriett Chapman (search for this): chapter 10
iage is authority for the statement coming from Mrs. Lincoln herself that she loved Douglas, and but for her promise to marry Lincoln would have accepted him. The unfortunate attitude she felt bound to maintain between these two young men ended in a spell of sickness. Douglas, still hopeful, was warm in the race, but the lady's physician,--her brother-in-law,--Dr. William Wallace, to whom she confided the real cause of her illness, saw Douglas and induced him to end his pursuit, Mrs. Harriett Chapman, statement, Nov. 8, 1887. which he did with great reluctance. If Miss Todd intended by her flirtation with Douglas to test Lincoln's devotion, she committed a grievous error. If she believed, because he was ordinarily so undemonstrative, that he was without will-power and incapable of being aroused, she certainly did not comprehend the man, Lincoln began now to feel the sting. Miss Todd's spur had certainly operated and with awakening effect. One evening Lincoln came into our
George Rogers Clark (search for this): chapter 10
tion to which many people from the North sent their daughters. In 1837 I visited Springfield, Illinois, remaining three months. I returned to Kentucky, remaining till 1839, when I again set out for Illinois, which State finally became my home. The paternal grandfather of Mary Todd, General Levi Todd. was born in 1756, was educated in Virginia, and studied law in the office of General Lewis of the State. He emigrated to Kentucky, was a lieutenant in the campaigns conducted by General George Rogers Clark against the Indians, and commanded a battalion in the battle of Blue Licks, August 1782, where his brother, John Todd, was killed. He succeeded Daniel Boone in command of the militia, ranking as major-general, and was one of the first settlers in Lexington, Ky. February 25, 1779, he married Miss Jane Briggs. The seventh child of this union, born February 25, 1791, was Robert S. Todd, the father of Mrs. Lincoln. On her maternal side Mrs. Lincoln was highly connected. Her great
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