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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
overing his gravity, he hastily pronounced them husband and wife. --Letter, James H. Matheney, Ms., Aug. 21, 1888. That same morning Miss Todd called on her friend Julia M. Jayne, who afterward married Lyman Trumbull, and made a similar request. The Edwardses were notified, and made such meager preparations as were possible on so short notice. License was obtained during the day, the minister, Charles N. Dresser, My father, Rev. Charles Dresser, was a graduate of Brown University, Providence, R. I., of the class of 1822. --Thomas W. Dresser, Ms. letter, Sept. 17, 1888. was sent for, and in the evening of November 4, 1842, as pale and trembling as if being driven to slaughter, Abraham Lincoln was at last married to Mary Todd. While dressing for the wedding in his room at Butler's house, the latter's little boy, Speed, seeing Lincoln so handsomely attired, in boyish innocence asked him where he was going? To hell, I suppose, was Lincoln's reply. One great trial of his life
Pekin (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
and aristocratic family, referring doubtless to some of the distinguished relatives who were connected with him by marriage. The story reaching Lincoln's ears, he laughed heartily over it one day in a Springfield store and remarked: That sounds strange to me, for I do not remember of but one who ever came to see me, and while he was in town he was accused of stealing a jew's harp. Letter. A. Y. Ellis, July 16, ‘66, Ms. In the convention which was held shortly after at the town of Pekin neither Baker nor Lincoln obtained the coveted honor; but John J. Hardin, of Morgan, destined to lose his life at the head of an Illinois regiment in the Mexican war, was nominated, and in the following August, elected by a good majority. Lincoln bore his defeat manfully. He was no doubt greatly disappointed, but by no means soured. He conceived the strange notion that the publicity given his so-called aristocratic family distinction would cost him the friendship of his humbler constituen
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
meeting with Martin Van Buren. partnership with Stephen T. Logan. partnership with William H. Herndon. Congressional aspirations nomination and election of John J. Hardin. the Presidential campaign of 1844. Lincoln takes the stump in Southern Indiana. Lincoln nominated for Congress. the canvass against Peter Cartwright. Lincoln elected. in Congress. the spot resolutions. Opposes the Mexican war. letters to Herndon. speeches in Congress. stumping through New England. a Congresthe honorable post of Presidential elector, and he extended the limits of his acquaintance by stumping the State. This was the year the gallant and magnetic Clay went down in defeat. Lincoln, in the latter end of the canvass, crossed over into Indiana and made several speeches. He spoke at Rockport and also at Gentryville, where he met the Grigsbys, the Gentrys, and other friends of his boyhood. The result of the election was a severe disappointment to Mr. Lincoln as well as to all other Wh
h--in fact we were allowed to speak nothing else. I finished my education at Mrs. Ward's Academy, an institution to which many people from the North sent their daughters. In 1837 I visited Springfield, Illinois, remaining three months. I returned to Kentucky, remaining till 1839, when I again set out for Illinois, which State finally became my home. The paternal grandfather of Mary Todd, General Levi Todd. was born in 1756, was educated in Virginia, and studied law in the office of General Lewis of the State. He emigrated to Kentucky, was a lieutenant in the campaigns conducted by General George Rogers Clark against the Indians, and commanded a battalion in the battle of Blue Licks, August 1782, where his brother, John Todd, was killed. He succeeded Daniel Boone in command of the militia, ranking as major-general, and was one of the first settlers in Lexington, Ky. February 25, 1779, he married Miss Jane Briggs. The seventh child of this union, born February 25, 1791, was Ro
C. M. Smith (search for this): chapter 10
ield in 1839, she was in her twenty-first year. She was a young woman of strong, passionate nature and quick temper, and had left her home in Kentucky to avoid living under the same roof with a stepmother. Mrs. Edwards, statement, Aug. 3, 1887. She came to live with her oldest sister, Elizabeth, who was the wife of Lincoln's colleague in the Legislature, Ninian W. Edwards. She had two other sisters, Frances, married to Dr. William Wallace, and Anne, who afterwards became the wife of C. M. Smith, a prominent and wealthy merchant. They all resided in Springfield. She was of the average height, weighing when I first saw her about a hundred and thirty pounds. She was rather compactly built, had a well rounded face, rich dark-brown hair, and bluish-gray eyes. In her bearing she was proud, but handsome and vivacious. Her education had been in no wise defective; she was a good conversationalist, using with equal fluency the French and English languages. When she used a pen, its po
Edward D. Baker (search for this): chapter 10
the nominating conventions by both Hardin and Baker in the order named. That two such aspiring poral unique and amusing incidents. He and Edward D. Baker were the two aspirants from Sangamon county, but Baker's long residence, extensive acquaintance, and general popularity were obstacles Lincppoint delegates to a district convention; and Baker beat me, and got the delegation instructed to pen (which, however, is not probable) by which Baker should be thrown out of the fight, I would be should despise myself were I to attempt it. Baker's friends had used as an argument against Linceld shortly after at the town of Pekin neither Baker nor Lincoln obtained the coveted honor; but Joblicly declined to contest the nomination with Baker in 1844; Hardin did the same for Lincoln in 18al talent in Springfield had marched. Hardin, Baker, Bissell, and even the dramatic Shields had entest need of friends he was against me and for Baker. Judge Logan's defeat in 1848 left Lincoln [7 more...]
Whitesides (search for this): chapter 10
to Kentucky this season. I am so poor and make so little headway in the world that I drop back in a month of idleness as much as I gain in a year's sowing. The last letter, and the one which closes this series, was written October 5, 1842. In it he simply announces his duel with Shields, and then goes on to narrate the particulars of the duelling business, which still rages in this city. This referred to a challenge from the belligerent Shields to William Butler, and another from General Whitesides to Dr. Merryman. In the latter, Lincoln acted as the friend of Merryman, but in neither case was there any encounter, and both ended in smoke. The concluding paragraph of this letter is the most singular in the entire correspondence. I give it entire without further comment: But I began this letter not for what I have been writing, but to say something on that subject which you know to be of such infinite solicitude to me. The immense sufferings you endured from the first da
Her great uncles, George B. Porter, who was governor of Michigan, James Madison Porter, secretary of the navy under President Tyler, and David R. Porter, governor of Pennsylvania, were men of ability and distinction. Her mother, Anne Eliza Parker,viltry the Whigs are at. Well, but Shields is the auditor of this Loco- I mean this Democratic State. So he is, and Tyler appointed him to office. Tyler appointed him? Yes (if you must chaw it over), Tyler appointed him; or, if it wasn'tTyler appointed him? Yes (if you must chaw it over), Tyler appointed him; or, if it wasn't him, it was old Granny Harrison, and that's all one. I tell you, Aunt ‘Becca, there's no mistake about his being a Whig. Why, his very looks shows it; everything about him shows it: if I was deaf and blind, I could tell him by the smell. I seed Tyler appointed him; or, if it wasn't him, it was old Granny Harrison, and that's all one. I tell you, Aunt ‘Becca, there's no mistake about his being a Whig. Why, his very looks shows it; everything about him shows it: if I was deaf and blind, I could tell him by the smell. I seed him when I was down in Springfield last winter. They had a sort of a gatherin‘ there one night among the grandees, they called a fair. All the gals about town was there, and all the handsome widows and married women, finickin‘ about trying to loo
as an accomplished French scholar. Our conversation at school was carried on entirely in French--in fact we were allowed to speak nothing else. I finished my education at Mrs. Ward's Academy, an institution to which many people from the North sent their daughters. In 1837 I visited Springfield, Illinois, remaining three months. I returned to Kentucky, remaining till 1839, when I again set out for Illinois, which State finally became my home. The paternal grandfather of Mary Todd, General Levi Todd. was born in 1756, was educated in Virginia, and studied law in the office of General Lewis of the State. He emigrated to Kentucky, was a lieutenant in the campaigns conducted by General George Rogers Clark against the Indians, and commanded a battalion in the battle of Blue Licks, August 1782, where his brother, John Todd, was killed. He succeeded Daniel Boone in command of the militia, ranking as major-general, and was one of the first settlers in Lexington, Ky. February 25, 1779,
James Matheney (search for this): chapter 10
t John J. Hardin, of Morgan, destined to lose his life at the head of an Illinois regiment in the Mexican war, was nominated, and in the following August, elected by a good majority. Lincoln bore his defeat manfully. He was no doubt greatly disappointed, but by no means soured. He conceived the strange notion that the publicity given his so-called aristocratic family distinction would cost him the friendship of his humbler constituents — his Clary's Grove friends. He took his friend James Matheney out into the woods with him one day and, calling up the bitter features of the canvass, protested vehemently and with great emphasis that he was anything but aristocratic and proud. Why, Jim, he said, I am now and always shall be the same Abe Lincoln I was when you first saw me. In the campaign of 1844 Lincoln filled the honorable post of Presidential elector, and he extended the limits of his acquaintance by stumping the State. This was the year the gallant and magnetic Clay went d
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