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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 10
ery near closing on this subject of the military tails before I was done with it. There is one entire article of the sort I have not discussed yet; I mean the military tail you Democrats are now engaged in dovetailing on to the great Michigander. Yes, sir, all his biographers (and they are legion) have him in hand, tying him to a military tail, like so many mischievous boys tying a dog to a bladder of beans. True, the material is very limited, but they are at it might and main. He invaded Canada without resistance, and he outvaded it without pursuit. As he did both under orders, I suppose there was to him neither credit nor discredit; but they are made to constitute a large part of the tail. He was not at Hull's surrender, but he was close by; he was volunteer aid to General Harrison on the day of the battle of the Thames; and as you said in 1840 Harrison was picking whortleberries two miles off while the battle was fought I suppose it is a just conclusion with you to say Cass was
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s major-general, and was one of the first settlers in Lexington, Ky. February 25, 1779, he married Miss Jane Briggs. The seventh child of this union, born February 25, 1791, was Robert S. Todd, the father of Mrs. Lincoln. On her maternal side Mrs. Lincoln was highly connected. Her great-grandfather, General Andrew Porter, was in the war of the Revolution. He succeeded Peter Muhlenberg as major-general of the Pennsylvania militia. Her great uncles, George B. Porter, who was governor of Michigan, James Madison Porter, secretary of the navy under President Tyler, and David R. Porter, governor of Pennsylvania, were men of ability and distinction. Her mother, Anne Eliza Parker, was a cousin of her father, Robert S. Todd. The latter had served in both houses of the Kentucky Legislature, and for over twenty years was president of the Bank of Kentucky of Lexington. He died July 16, 1849. To a young lady in whose veins coursed the blood that had come down from this long and disting
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
cky. restored spirits. return of Lincoln to Illinois. letters to Speed. the party at Simeon Frand when the latter started on his journey from Illinois to Kentucky. It bears no date, but was handeferred to the affair with Shields. People in Illinois did gradually forget or, at least, cease mentounced Jacksonian attitude. He had come into Illinois with the early immigrants from Kentucky and Torward, and at the head of the regiments from Illinois some of the bravest men and the best legal ta seat in Congress. He was the only Whig from Illinois. His colleagues in the Illinois delegation wh many of these the newly elected member from Illinois was destined to sustain another and far diffeigh hope and confidence, he said exultingly. Illinois is expected to better her condition in this rr of a century among the political spirits in Illinois was by no means an accident; neither will the this vein to a gentleman still living in central Illinois, who, I suppose, would prefer that his na[2 more...]
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
is Whiteside, Shields's second, said no because of the law. Thus ended duel Jo. 2. Yesterday Whiteside chose to consider himself insulted by Dr. Merryman, so sent him a kind of quasi-challenge inviting him to meet him at the Planter's House in St. Louis, on the next Friday, to settle their difficulty. Merryman made me his friend, and sent Whiteside a note, inquiring to know it he meant .is note as a challenge, an d if so, that he would, according to the law in such case made and provided, preto dictate time and place, but that he (Merryman) would waive the question of time, and meet him at Louisiana, M,. Upon my presenting this note to Whiteside, and stating verbally its contents, he declined receiving it, saying he Pad business in St. Louis. and it was as near as Louisiana Merryman then directed me to notify Whiteside that he should publish the correspondence between them, with such comments as he saw fit This I did. Thus it st o a bed-time last flight. This morning Whiteside, b
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ay to play a far different role in the national drama. Here it is: Washington, Feb. 2, 1848. Dear William: I just take up my pen to say that Mr. Stephens, of Georgia, a little, slim, pale-faced, consumptive man, with a voice like Logan's, has just concluded the very best speech of an hour's length I ever heard. My old, witherred in the halls of Congress since that time could in any way detract from the fame of Mr. Lincoln, and I therefore reproduce it here: But the gentlemen from Georgia [Mr. Iverson] further says, we have deserted all our principles, and taken shelter under General Taylor's military coattail; and he seems to think this is exceediand military coat-tails, or tails of any sort, are not figures of speech such as I would be the first to introduce into discussion here; but as the gentleman from Georgia has thought fit to introduce them, he and you are welcome to all you have made or can make by them. If you have any more old horses, trot them out; any more tai
Jeff Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s he; but how will we find out? Why, says I, we'll just write and ax the printer. Agreed again! says he; and by thunder! if it does turn out that Shields is a Democrat, I never will -- Jefferson! Jefferson! What do you want, Peggy? Do get through your everlasting clatter some time, and bring me a gourd of water; the child's been crying for a drink this live-long hour. Let it die, then; it may as well die for water as to be taxed to death to fatten officers of State. Jeff run off to get the water, though, just like he hadn't been saying anything spiteful for he's a real good-hearted fellow, after all, once you get at the foundation of him. I walked into the house, and, Why, Peggy, says I, declare we like to forgot you altogether. Oh, yes, says she, when a body can't help themselves, everybody soon forgets 'em; but, thank God! by day after to-morrow I shall be well enough to milk the cows, and pen the calves, and wring the contrary ones' tails for 'em, an
Menard (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
one say that Lincoln don't want to go to Congress, I wish you, as a personal friend of mine, would tell him you have reason to believe he is mistaken. The truth is I would like to go very much. Still, circumstances may happen which may prevent my being a candidate. If there are any who be my friends in such an enterprise, what I now want is that they shall not throw me away just yet. Letter to R. S. Thomas, Virginia, III., Feb. 14, ‘43, Ms. To another friend in the adjoining county of Menard a few days after the meeting of the Whigs in Sangamon, he explains how Baker defeated him. The entire absence of any feeling of bitterness, or what the politicians call revenge, is the most striking feature of the letter. It is truly gratifying, he says, to me to learn that while the people of Sangamon have cast me off, my old friends of Menard, who have known me longest and best, stick to me. It would astonish if not amuse the older citizens to learn that I (a strange, friendless, une
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ay, to my astonishment, a proposition was made to meet in Missouri, within three miles of Alton, on the next Thursday! The declined agreeing upon the terms until we should meet in Missouri. Immediately after, I called upon Dr. Merryman and withdached the city and learned that Dr. Merryman had left for Missouri, Mr. Lincoln having left before the proposition was made, Hope, as the friends of Mr. Shields. We then crossed to Missouri, where a proposition was made by General Hardin and Dr. Eless inclined to inquire, as Mr. Lincoln was then gone to Missouri, and Mr. Shields not yet arrived from Tremont. In fact, terms and no other, let the following documents attest: Missouri, September 22, 1842. gentlemen:--All papers in relatioer. John D. Whiteside. Wm. Lee D. Ewing. T. M. Hope. Missouri, September 22, 1842. gentlemen:--All papers in relatio mistaken in Merryman's proposition to meet him at Louisiana Mo., thinking it was the State of Louisiana. This Merryman hoot
Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n and his wife. Mary Todd, who afterwards became the wife of Mr. Lincoln, was born in Lexington, Kentucky, December 13, 1818. My mother, related Mrs. Lincoln to me in 1865, died when I was still ne in command of the militia, ranking as major-general, and was one of the first settlers in Lexington, Ky. February 25, 1779, he married Miss Jane Briggs. The seventh child of this union, born Febrf the Kentucky Legislature, and for over twenty years was president of the Bank of Kentucky of Lexington. He died July 16, 1849. To a young lady in whose veins coursed the blood that had come doct? After you and I had once been at the residence, did you not go and take me all the way to Lexington and back for no other purpose but to get to see her again on our return on that evening to takhig. Many persons have yielded to the impression that Mr. Lincoln visited Clay at his home in Lexington and felt a personal loss in his defeat, but such is not the case. He took no more gloomy view
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ggs. The seventh child of this union, born February 25, 1791, was Robert S. Todd, the father of Mrs. Lincoln. On her maternal side Mrs. Lincoln was highly connected. Her great-grandfather, General Andrew Porter, was in the war of the Revolution. He succeeded Peter Muhlenberg as major-general of the Pennsylvania militia. Her great uncles, George B. Porter, who was governor of Michigan, James Madison Porter, secretary of the navy under President Tyler, and David R. Porter, governor of Pennsylvania, were men of ability and distinction. Her mother, Anne Eliza Parker, was a cousin of her father, Robert S. Todd. The latter had served in both houses of the Kentucky Legislature, and for over twenty years was president of the Bank of Kentucky of Lexington. He died July 16, 1849. To a young lady in whose veins coursed the blood that had come down from this long and distinguished ancestral line, who could even go back in the genealogical chart to the sixth century, Lincoln, the child
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