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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Indianapolis (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
relates Nelson, Judge Abram Hammond, who was afterwards Governor of Indiana, and I arranged to go from Terre Haute to Indianapolis in the stage coach. An entire day was usually consumed in the journey. By daybreak the stage had arrived from the Weers, and was inclined to the opinion that the world would follow the darned thing off! Late in the evening we reached Indianapolis, and hurried to Browning's hotel, losing sight of the stranger altogether. We retired to our room to brush and wash ay enough, years after this, Hammond had vacated the office of Governor of Indiana a few days before Lincoln arrived in Indianapolis, on his way to Washington to be inaugurated President. I had many opportunities after the stage ride to cultivate Mr.e for Washington, Mr. Lincoln caused John P. Usher and myself to be invited to accompany him. We agreed to join him in Indianapolis. On reaching that city the Presidential party had already arrived, and upon inquiry we were informed that the Presid
Oregon (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
coln for his heroic efforts on the stump and elsewhere in behalf of the Whig party and its measures, had offered him the office of either Governor or Secretary of Oregon, and with the view of considering this and other offers he returned to Washington. Lincoln used to relate of this last-named journey an amusing incident illustrae territorial posts offered by President Taylor to Lincoln were freely discussed by the latter's friends. Some urged his acceptance on the usual ground that when Oregon was admitted as a State, he might be its first Senator. Lincoln himself had some inclination to accept. He told me himself that he felt by his course in Congress he had committed political suicide, and wanted to try a change of locality — hence the temptation to go to Oregon. But when he brought the proposition home to his fireside, his wife put her foot squarely down on it with a firm and emphatic No. That always ended it with Lincoln. The result of the whole thing proved a fortunate
Lincoln, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
no little in his leisure moments. In travelling on the circuit, relates one of his associates at the bar, Lawrence Weldon, letter, Feb. 10, 1866, Ms. he was in the habit of rising earlier than his brothers of the bar. On such occasions he was wont to sit by the fire, having uncovered the coals, and muse, and ponder, and soliloquize, inspired, no doubt, by that strange psychological influence which is so poetically described by Poe in The Raven. On one of these occasions, at the town of Lincoln, sitting in the position described, he quoted aloud and at length the poem called Immortality. When he had finished he was questioned as to the authorship and where it could be found. He had forgotten the author, but said that to him it sounded as much like true poetry as anything he had ever heard. He was particularly pleased with the last two stanzas. Beyond a limited acquaintance with Shakespeare, Byron, and Burns, Mr. Lincoln, comparatively speaking, had no knowledge of literatur
Keene, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
extensive practice and reputation in Chicago. He was shrewd, adroit, and gifted with a knowledge of what politicians would call good management — a quality or characteristic in which Lincoln was strikingly deficient. He had endorsed the Mexican war, but strangely enough, had lost none of his prestige with the Whigs on that account. The following letter by Butterfield's daughter is not without interest: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My father was born in Keene, N. H., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he was on the 21st of June in 1849 appointed Commissioner of the Land Office by President Taylor. A competitor for the position at that time was. Abraham Lincoln, who was beaten, it was said, by the superior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but more correctly by the paramount influence of his friend Daniel Webster. He held the pos
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
tizer besides. His tall and uncommunicative companion declined this last and best evidence of Kentucky hospitality on the same ground as the tobacco. When they separated that afternoon, the Kentuckian, transferring to another stage, bound for Louisville, shook Lincoln warmly by the hand. See here, stranger, he said, good-humoredly, you're a clever, but strange companion. I may never see you again, and I don't want to offend you, but I want to say this: my experience has taught me that a man here, now, and although you know I am not a very petulant man, I declare that I am almost out of patience with Mr. Everett's endless importunities. It seems like he not only writes all the letters he can himself, but he gets everybody else in Louisville and vicinity to be constantly writing to us about his claim. I have always said that Mr. Everett is a very clever fellow, and I am very sorry he cannot be obliged; but it does seem to me he ought to know we are interested to collect his claim,
Vistula (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
e that his heart is as large as his arms are long. Mrs. Lincoln accompanied her husband to Washington and remained during one session of Congress. While there they boarded at the same house with Joshua R. Giddings, and when in 1856 the valiant old Abolitionist came to take part in the canvass in Illinois, he early sought out Lincoln, with whom he had been so favorably impressed several years before. On his way home from Congress Lincoln came by way of Niagara Falls and down Lake Erie to Toledo or Detroit. It happened that, some time after, I went to New York and also returned by way of Niagara Falls. In the office, a few days after my return, I was endeavoring to entertain my partner with an account of my trip, and among other things described the Falls. In the attempt I indulged in a good deal of imagery. As I warmed up with the subject my descriptive powers expanded accordingly. The mad rush of water, the roar, the rapids, and the rainbow furnished me with an abundance of
Terre Haute (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
s taught me that a man who has no vices has d-d few virtues. Good-day. Lincoln enjoyed this reminiscence of the journey, and took great pleasure in relating it. During this same journey occurred an incident for which Thomas H. Nelson, of Terre Haute, Indiana, who was appointed Minister to Chili by Lincoln, when he was President, is authority. In the spring of 1849, relates Nelson, Judge Abram Hammond, who was afterwards Governor of Indiana, and I arranged to go from Terre Haute to IndianapoliTerre Haute to Indianapolis in the stage coach. An entire day was usually consumed in the journey. By daybreak the stage had arrived from the West, and as we stepped in we discovered that the entire back seat was occupied by a long, lank individual, whose head seemed to protrude, from one end of the coach and his feet from the other. He was the sole occupant, and was sleeping soundly. Hammond slapped him familiarly on the shoulder, and asked him if he had chartered the stage for the day. The stranger, now wide awak
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
go lawyer, W. C. Whitney, Ms. in a letter to me about Mr. Lincoln, in 1866, says: Lincoln once told me that he had taken you in as a partner, supposing you had system and would keep things in order, but that he found out you had no more system than he had, but that you were in reality a good lawyer, so that he was doubly disappointed. Lincoln knew no such thing as order or method in his law practice. He made no preparation in advance, but trusted to the hour for its inspiration and to Providence for his supplies. In the matter of letter-writing I wish you would learn of Everett what he would take, over and above a discharge, for all trouble we have been at to take his business out of our hands and give it to somebody else. It is impossible to collect money on that or any other claim here, now, and although you know I am not a very petulant man, I declare that I am almost out of patience with Mr. Everett's endless importunities. It seems like he not only writes all the letter
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
urney to Washington and incidents. return to Illinois. settling down to practice law. life on theln's first appearance in the Supreme Court of Illinois. professional honor and personal honesty. tlitionist came to take part in the canvass in Illinois, he early sought out Lincoln, with whom he had to this step by many of his Whig friends in Illinois, but he was so hedged about with other aspirl have trouble to get it for any other man in Illinois. The reason is that McGaughey, an Indiana exthe landlord, who he was. Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, a member of Congress, was the response. I whange in the law, and more in the lawyers, of Illinois. The conviction had settled in the minds of used in this book, refers to that portion of Illinois which lies south of the famous National Road.new one to the Circuit and District Courts of Illinois. I am very friendly to the present incumbentln's first appearance in the Supreme Court of Illinois. A case being called for hearing, Mr. Lincoln[1 more...]
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ted Minister to Chili by Lincoln, when he was President, is authority. In the spring of 1849, relates Nelson, Judge Abram Hammond, who was afterwards Governor of Indiana, and I arranged to go from Terre Haute to Indianapolis in the stage coach. An entire day was usually consumed in the journey. By daybreak the stage had arrived use, thus avoiding further contact with our now distinguished fellow-traveller. Curiously enough, years after this, Hammond had vacated the office of Governor of Indiana a few days before Lincoln arrived in Indianapolis, on his way to Washington to be inaugurated President. I had many opportunities after the stage ride to cultivad locating it in Egypt The word Egypt, so frequently used in this book, refers to that portion of Illinois which lies south of the famous National Road. or in Indiana, pass it off for a purely original conception. Every recital was followed by its storm of laughter and chorus of cheers. After this had all died down, some unfo
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