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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. Search the whole document.

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Stephen T. Logan (search for this): chapter 12
ncided with Lincoln in his political views were disturbed in the same way. Even Logan was not wholly free from the degrading passion. But in this respect Lincoln susome ingeniously planned interruption not on the programme. In a case where Judge Logan--always earnest and grave -opposed him, Lincoln created no little merriment by his reference to Logan's style of dress. He carried the surprise in store for the latter, till he reached his turn before the jury. Addressing them, he said: Germit yourselves to be overcome by the eloquence of counsel for the defense. Judge Logan, I know, is an effective lawyer. I have met him too often to doubt that; bution and fastidiousness, he hasn't knowledge enough to put his shirt on right. Logan turned red as crimson, but sure enough, Lincoln was correct, for the former hadpleated bosom behind. The general laugh which followed destroyed the effect of Logan's eloquence over the jury — the very point at which Lincoln aimed. The tria
L. D. Chaddon (search for this): chapter 12
le he was holding court for Davis by attempting to defend against a note to which there were many makers. We had no legal, but a good moral defense, but what we wanted most of all was to stave it off till the next term of court by one expedient or another. We bothered the court about it till late on Saturday, the day of adjournment. He adjourned for supper with nothing left but this case to dispose of. After supper he heard our twaddle for nearly an hour, and then made this odd entry: L. D. Chaddon vs. J. D. Beasley et al. April Term, 1856. Champaign County Court. Plea in abatement by B. Z. Green, a defendant not served, filed Saturday at 11 o'clock A. M., April 24, 1856, stricken from the files by order of court. Demurrer to declaration, if there ever was one, overruled. Defendants who are served now, at 8 o'clock, P. M., of the last day of the term, ask to plead to the merits, which is denied by the court on the ground that the offer comes too late, and therefore, as by nil di
. I used to attend the Danville court, and while there, usually roomed with Lincoln and Davis. We stopped at McCormick's hotel, an old-fashioned frame country tavern. Jurors, counsel, prisoners, everybody ate at a long table. The judge, Lincoln, and I had the ladies' parlor fitted up with two beds. Lincoln, Swett, McWilliams, of Bloomington, Voorhees, of Covington, Ind., O. L. Davis, Drake, Ward Lamon, Lawrence, Beckwith, and 0. F. Harmon, of Danville, Whiteman, of Iroquois County, and Chandler, of Williamsport, Ind., constituted the bar. Lincoln, Davis, Swett, I, and others who came from the western part of the state would drive from Urbana. The distance was thirty-six miles. We sang and exchanged stories all the way. We had no hesitation in stopping at a farm-house and ordering them to kill and cook a chicken for dinner. By dark we reached Danville. Lamon would have whiskey in his office for the drinking ones, and those who indulged in petty gambling would get by themselves a
Joseph E. McDonald (search for this): chapter 12
l about him. The next day on the way to the court — house he told me he had been greatly troubled over what I related about Wyant; that his sleep had been disturbed by the fear that he had been too bitter and unrelenting in his prosecution of him. I acted, he said, on the theory that he was possuming insanity, and now I fear I have been too severe and that the poor fellow may be insane after all. If he cannot realize the wrong of his crime, then I was wrong in aiding to punish him.--Hon. Joseph E. McDonald. August, 1888. Statement to J. W. W. He would abandon his case first. He did so in the case of Buckmaster for the use of Dedham vs. Beemes and Arthur, in our Supreme Court, in which I happened to be opposed to him. Another gentlemen, less fastidious, took Mr. Lincoln's place and gained the case. A widow who owned a piece of valuable land employed Lincoln and myself to examine the title to the property, with the view of ascertaining whether certain alleged tax liens were just or
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 12
oad. the Manny case. First meeting with Edwin M. Stanton. defense of William Armstrong. last lawunsel for McCormick was Reverdy Johnson. Edwin M. Stanton and George Harding, of Philadelphia, werehis client had also associated with him Mr. Edwin M. Stanton, of Pittsburg, and a lawyer of our own quired a man of the experience and power of Mr. Stanton to meet Mr. Johnson. The Cincinnati lawyer this motion excluded either Mr. Lincoln or Mr. Stanton, -which? By the custom of the bar, as betw By this rule Mr. Lincoln had precedence. Mr. Stanton suggested to Mr. Lincoln to make the speech. Mr. Lincoln answered. No, you speak. Mr. Stanton replied, I will, and taking up his hat, said hble for me ever to return. Lincoln felt that Stanton had not only been very discourteous to him, bde, if not unkind, treatment from all hands. Stanton, in his brusque and abrupt way, it is said, dthat he had been roughly handled by that man Stanton ; that he overheard the latter from an adjoin
William H. Herndon (search for this): chapter 12
divided it with me. If I was not there, he would wrap up my share in a piece of paper and place it in my drawer — marking it with a pencil, Case of Roe vs. Doe.--Herndon's half. On many topics he was not a good conversationalist, because he felt that he was not learned enough. Neither was he a good listener. Putting it a litt divided up into smaller sums proportioned to the number of heirs. Lincoln himself distributed these to the heirs, obtaining a receipt from each one. Dear Herndon: One morning, not long before Lincoln's nomination — a year perhaps — I was in your office and heard the following: Mr. Lincoln, seated at the baize-covered tto get from me, and said: Hannah, they can't get your land. Let them try it in the Circuit Court, and then you appeal it; bring it to the Supreme Court and I and Herndon will attend to it for nothing. From statement, Nov. 24, 1865. The last suit of any importance in which Lincoln was personally engaged, was known as the Jo<
William H. Hannah (search for this): chapter 12
letter, Aug. 22, 1866, Ms. Before passing it may be well to listen to the humble tribute of old Hannah Armstrong, the defendant's mother: Lincoln had said to me, Hannah, your son will be cleared before sundown. I left the court-room, and they came and told me that my son was cleared and a free man. I went up to the court-house. ds with me; so did the judge and Lincoln; tears streamed down Lincoln's eyes ... .. After the trial I asked him what his fee would be; told him I was poor. Why, Hannah, he said, I sha'n't charge you a cent, and anything else I can do for you, will do it willingly and without charge. He afterwards wrote to me about a piece of land which certain men were trying to get from me, and said: Hannah, they can't get your land. Let them try it in the Circuit Court, and then you appeal it; bring it to the Supreme Court and I and Herndon will attend to it for nothing. From statement, Nov. 24, 1865. The last suit of any importance in which Lincoln was perso
James P. Metzler (search for this): chapter 12
re enough, Lincoln was correct, for the former had donned a new shirt, and by mistake had drawn it over his head with the pleated bosom behind. The general laugh which followed destroyed the effect of Logan's eloquence over the jury — the very point at which Lincoln aimed. The trial of William Armstrong This incident in Lincoln's career has been most happily utilized by Dr. Edward Eggleston in his story The Graysons, recently published in the Century Magazine. for the murder of James P. Metzler, in May, 1858, at Beardstown, Illinois, in which Lincoln secured the acquittal of the defendant, was one of the gratifying triumphs in his career as a lawyer. Lincoln's defense, wherein he floored the principal prosecuting witness, who had testified positively to seeing the fatal blow struck in the moonlight, by showing from an almanac that the moon had set, was not more convincing than his eloquent and irresistible appeal in his client's favor. The latter's mother, old Hannah Armstro
Edward Eggleston (search for this): chapter 12
nd fastidiousness, he hasn't knowledge enough to put his shirt on right. Logan turned red as crimson, but sure enough, Lincoln was correct, for the former had donned a new shirt, and by mistake had drawn it over his head with the pleated bosom behind. The general laugh which followed destroyed the effect of Logan's eloquence over the jury — the very point at which Lincoln aimed. The trial of William Armstrong This incident in Lincoln's career has been most happily utilized by Dr. Edward Eggleston in his story The Graysons, recently published in the Century Magazine. for the murder of James P. Metzler, in May, 1858, at Beardstown, Illinois, in which Lincoln secured the acquittal of the defendant, was one of the gratifying triumphs in his career as a lawyer. Lincoln's defense, wherein he floored the principal prosecuting witness, who had testified positively to seeing the fatal blow struck in the moonlight, by showing from an almanac that the moon had set, was not more convinc
rt and bar is now. The feelings were those of great fraternity in the bar, and if we desired to restrict our circle it was no trouble for Davis to freeze out any disagreeable persons. Lincoln was fond of going all by himself to any little show or concert. I have known him to slip away and spend the entire evening at a little magic lantern show intended for children. A travelling concert company, calling themselves the Newhall Family, were sure of drawing Lincoln. One of their number, Mrs. Hillis, a good singer, he used to tell us was the only woman who ever seemed to exhibit any liking for him. I attended a negro-minstrel show in Chicago, where we heard Dixie sung. It was entirely new, and pleased him greatly. In court he was irrepressible and apparently inexhaustible in his fund of stories. Where in the world a man who had travelled so little and struggled amid the restrictions of such limited surroundings could gather up such apt and unique yarns we never could guess. Davis
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